24 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Service Workers are very powerful. They allow offline functionality, push notifications, content caching, and more. They have a short lifetime, and the way they work is by waking up when they get an event (e.g., network requests, push notifications, connectivity changes) and then they start running only as long as the process needs it.
  2. Nov 2020
  3. Oct 2020
    1. (../)#.git(:h) # relative path to containing directory, eg. '../../..', '.' (../)#.git(:a) # absolute path to actual file, eg. '/home/you/src/prj1/.git' (../)#.git(:a:h) # absolute path to containing directory, eg. '/home/you/src/prj1'
    1. The needs: keyword enables executing jobs out-of-order, allowing you to implement a directed acyclic graph in your .gitlab-ci.yml. This lets you run some jobs without waiting for other ones, disregarding stage ordering so you can have multiple stages running concurrently.
  4. mdxjs.com mdxjs.com
    1. Powerful: MDX blends markdown and JSX syntax to fit perfectly in JSX-based projects.
    1. IMO svelte does have a responsibility to teach/demo the basics of "functional javascript" probably as a docs/tutorial/demos chapter on "the power of javascript expressions"
    1. If you return an object, then it is possible to resolve an import to a different id while excluding it from the bundle at the same time. This allows you to replace dependencies with external dependencies without the need for the user to mark them as "external" manually via the external option
    2. Defines a custom resolver.
  5. Sep 2020
    1. I think Svelte's approach where it replaces component instances with the component markup is vastly superior to Angular and the other frameworks. It gives the developer more control over what the DOM structure looks like at runtime—which means better performance and fewer CSS headaches, and also allows the developer to create very powerful recursive components.
    2. They don't need to add a prop for every action. The action itself can be passed in as a prop. <script> export let action; </script> <div use:action>whatever</div> The argument for the action can be another prop or can be part of the same prop.
    1. await schema.validateAt('foo[0].bar', rootValue); // => ValidationError: must be a string await schema.validateAt('foo[1].bar', rootValue); // => '1'
  6. May 2020
    1. All of the features of NLS were in support of Engelbart's goal of augmenting collective knowledge work and therefore focused on making the user more powerful, not simply on making the system easier to use.
    1. Conditional Per-Request Settings For additional flexibility, the directives provided by mod_setenvif allow environment variables to be set on a per-request basis, conditional on characteristics of particular requests. For example, a variable could be set only when a specific browser (User-Agent) is making a request, or only when a specific Referer [sic] header is found. Even more flexibility is available through the mod_rewrite's RewriteRule which uses the [E=...] option to set environment variables.
  7. Jan 2020
    1. However forget the "one-liner" idea once you start using sed's micro-commands. It is useful to lay it out like a structured program until you get the feel of it... It is surprisingly simple, and equally unusual. You could think of it as the "assembler language" of text editing.
  8. Mar 2019
  9. Jan 2019
    1. power

      This claim is articulated pretty strongly in Gorgias's Encomium of Helen. The piece is a kind of thought experiment where Gorgias attempts to defend Helen. He points out that language (or speech) is "a powerful lord, which by means of the finest and most invisible body effects the divinest works: it can stop fear and banish grief and create joy and nature pity" (sec. 8). Part of his defense, then, is that Helen almost didn't have a choice; the speech was too powerful, god-like even. I found a .pdf copy of it here: http://myweb.fsu.edu/jjm09f/RhetoricSpring2012/Gorgias%20Encomium%20of%20Helen.pdf

    1. power

      This claim is articulated pretty strongly in Gorgias's Encomium of Helen. The piece is a kind of thought experiment where Gorgias attempts to defend Helen. He points out that language (or speech) is "a powerful lord, which by means of the finest and most invisible body effects the divinest works: it can stop fear and banish grief and create joy and nature pity" (sec. 8). Part of his defense, then, is that Helen almost didn't have a choice; the speech was too powerful, god-like even. I found a .pdf copy of it here: http://myweb.fsu.edu/jjm09f/RhetoricSpring2012/Gorgias%20Encomium%20of%20Helen.pdf

  10. Jul 2017
  11. Mar 2017
    1. speech is prior to and somehow superior to writing

      No matter how well written a document is, one powerful speech can move thousands in a single day while a document can only reach a few at a time.

      Not to mention the amount of illiterate people that were around when rhetoric came about.

    1. i!.course to exercise power. T

      We all know they immense power that discourse can hold, regardless of where the original knowledge came from, the appropriate discourse can light a match that starts a fire.