280 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2021
  2. Mar 2021
    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2021, February 17). The Covid-19 pandemic has accelerated the erosion of trust around the world: Significant drop in trust in the two largest economies: The U.S. (40%) and Chinese (30%) governments are deeply distrusted by respondents from the 26 other markets surveyed. 1/2 https://t.co/C86chd3bb4 [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1362021569476894726

    1. Yufika, A., Wagner, A. L., Nawawi, Y., Wahyuniati, N., Anwar, S., Yusri, F., Haryanti, N., Wijayanti, N. P., Rizal, R., Fitriani, D., Maulida, N. F., Syahriza, M., Ikram, I., Fandoko, T. P., Syahadah, M., Asrizal, F. W., Aletta, A., Haryanto, S., Jamil, K. F., … Harapan, H. (2020). Parents’ hesitancy towards vaccination in Indonesia: A cross-sectional study in Indonesia. Vaccine, 38(11), 2592–2599. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.01.072

    1. a data donation platform that allows users of browsers to donate data on their usage of specific services (eg Youtube, or Facebook) to a platform.

      This seems like a really promising pattern for many data-driven problems. Browsers can support opt-in donation to contribute their data to improve Web search, social media, recommendations, lots of services that implicitly require lots of operational data.

    1. Cailin O’Connor. (2020, November 10). New paper!!! @psmaldino look at what causes the persistence of poor methods in science, even when better methods are available. And we argue that interdisciplinary contact can lead better methods to spread. 1 https://t.co/C5beJA5gMi [Tweet]. @cailinmeister. https://twitter.com/cailinmeister/status/1326221893372833793

    1. David Benkeser. (2020, November 9). Another view on uncertainty associated based on Pfizer’s results. Even if you were highly skeptical about MRNA vaccines (many are [were?]) with 50% prior belief that VE ~ 0, based on an 8:86 vax:placebo case split, the posterior probability that VE > 75% is ~ 1. Https://t.co/xtBONtGHmT [Tweet]. @biosbenk. https://twitter.com/biosbenk/status/1325856366225993729

    1. And trust us, we’ve been playing with different APIs for two years and this was the easiest and fastest outcome.
  3. Feb 2021
    1. With blockchain, trust comes from the network itself. Instead of simply trusting a middleman institution, we can trust the blockchain code. The way that the blockchain is built means all parties in the system, not just the ones involved in the transaction, come to an agreement on what the facts are. And once they agree, a new block is added

      Trust in blockchain

    1. Brian Nosek. (2020, December 5). We need a #2020goodnews trend. Here’s one: Science keeps getting more open. One indicator from @OSFramework: OSF users posted 9,349 files of data or other research content PER DAY OSF users made 5,633 files public PER DAY EVERY DAY in 2020 #openscience is accelerating [Tweet]. @BrianNosek. https://twitter.com/BrianNosek/status/1335210552252125184

    1. We’ve always used the term ‘social networking’ to refer to the process of finding and connecting with those people. And that process has always depended on a fabric of trust woven most easily in the context of local communities and face-to-face interaction.

      Too much of modern social networking suffers from this fabric of trust and rampant context collapse. How can we improve on these looking forward?

    1. that's a point, but I would say the opposite, when entering credit card data I would rathre prefer to be entirely in the Verified By Visa (Paypal) webpage (with the url easily visible in the address bar) rather that entring my credit card data in an iframe of someone's website.
    1. As soon as you're displaying content from another domain, you're basically trusting that domain not to serve-up malware. There's nothing wrong with iframes per se. If you control the content of the iframe, they're perfectly safe.
  4. Jan 2021
    1. unlike a traditional computer, a blockchain computer can offer strong trust guarantees, rooted in the mathematical and game-theoretic properties of the system. A user or developer can trust that a piece of code running on a blockchain computer will continue to behave as designed, even if individual participants in the network change their motivations or try to subvert the system. This means that the control of a blockchain computer can be placed in the hands of a community
    1. DOMPurify is written by security people who have vast background in web attacks and XSS. Fear not.
  5. Dec 2020
    1. “Being under constant surveillance in the workplace is psychological abuse,” Heinemeier Hansson added. “Having to worry about looking busy for the stats is the last thing we need to inflict on anyone right now.”

      I really like the Basecamp approach (I forget where I heard this...could have been in one of the Rework podcasts):

      Don't try to get the most out of everyone; try to get the best out of them.

      If you're looking for ways to build trust in a team, I can't recommend the following books published by Basecamp:

      • Rework
      • Remote
      • It doesn't have to be crazy at work
    2. For example, to help maintain privacy and trust, the user data provided in productivity score is aggregated over a 28-day period.

      So that the fact that the metrics are collected over 28 days is meant to maintain privacy and trust. How?

  6. Nov 2020
    1. obviously it's too late, but it's a good practice to keep the 3rd party dependencies mirrored in your own infrastructure :) There is NO GUARANTEE that even a huge site (like launchpad for downloading DEBs) won't go down over a period of time.
  7. Oct 2020
    1. To ascertain whether this decrease in confidence was as a result of the Cummings events (a Cummings effect), we carried out analyses using two types of comparisons. First, we compared the responses for people living in England to those of people living in the devolved nations of Scotland and Wales who were asked to rate their confidence in their own devolved governments. There was no evidence of a similar large decrease in confidence in the governments of the devolved nations either descriptively (appendix p 1–3) or statistically

      Trust in government

    1. When I received Chris’s comment, my first response was that I should delete my post or at least the incorrect part of it. It’s embarrassing to have your incorrect understandings available for public view. But I decided to leave the post as is but put in a disclaimer so that others would not be misled by my misunderstandings. This experience reminded me that learning makes us vulnerable. Admitting that you don’t know something is hard and being corrected is even harder. Chris was incredibly gentle in his correction. It makes me think about how I respond to my students’ work. Am I as gentle with their work as Chris was to mine? Could I be more gentle? How often have I graded my students’ work and only focused on what they did wrong? Or forgotten that feeling of vulnerability when you don’t know something, when you put your work out for others to judge? This experience has also reminded me that it’s important that we as teachers regularly put ourselves into situations in which we authentically grapple with not knowing something. We should regularly share our less than fully formed understandings with others for feedback. It helps us remember that even confident learners can struggle with being vulnerable. And we need to keep in mind that many of our students are not confident learners.

      I'm reminded here of the broad idea that many bloggers write about sooner or later of their website being a "thought space" or place to contemplate out in the open. More often than not, even if they don't have an audience to interact with, their writings become a way of thinking out loud, clarifying things for themselves, self-evolving, or putting themselves out there for potential public reactions (good, bad, or indifferent).

      While writing things out loud to no audience can be helpful and useful on an individual level, it's often even more helpful to have some sort of productive and constructive feedback. While a handful of likes or positive seeming responses can be useful, I always prefer the ones that make me think more broadly, deeply, or force me to consider other pieces I hadn't envisioned before. To me this is the real value of these open and often very public thought spaces.

      For those interested in the general idea, I've been bookmarking/tagging things around the idea of thought spaces I've read on my own website. Hopefully this collection helps others better understand the spectrum of these ideas for themselves.

      With respect to the vulnerability piece, I'm reminded of an episode of <cite>The Human Current</cite> I listened to a few weeks back. There was an excellent section that touched on building up trust with students or even a class when it comes to providing feedback and criticism. Having a bank of trust makes it easier to give feedback as well as to receive it. Here's a link to the audio portion and a copy of the relevant text.

  8. solidproject.org solidproject.org
    1. The last login you'll ever need Solid provides for the first time a single global logon system, so that when you log into any web site, instead of having to log in with the usual 'f' and 'g', etc, blue buttons, and then be tracked by Facebook, Google, or some other large social network, instead you can log in with any Solid provider you trust, and that won't track you.
  9. Sep 2020
  10. Aug 2020
    1. The straightforward solution to integrate WPML with third party translation services was to do it via dedicated plugins. A separate plugin for each company offering translation services could do the trick. However, this approach had a few drawbacks. For example, WPML developers would need to update and test all these plugins whenever the WPML core plugins received an update, and vice versa; when the API used by the external service changed, you needed to incorporate the change to WPML and test it as well.
  11. covid-19.iza.org covid-19.iz