50 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2018
    1. One teacher's experience using slack, referencing what things were like before using it and after; contains many ideas on how about how to maximize Slack (3/5)

    1. One instructor's use of Slack, comparing and contrasting other LMS (but he used Canvas); good basic breakdown of the conversational tools and samples of how hey can be used; This is a great primer of Slack's use in the classroom (5/5)

    1. Use of Slack in a FACE-TO-FACE class and how much it increased interaction; brings up a point that concerns me and that's what happens when the instructor/TA appear to be available 24/7 given the nature of Slack; good exploration of motivating students to use it (4/5)

  2. Oct 2018
  3. Aug 2018
  4. Jun 2018
    1. The framework harnesses annotation to link credibility indicators to specific pieces of online content — not only to entire documents or pages, but even to paragraphs, sentences, or fragments. Annotation is used throughout: in the process of creating credibility indicators, to display results directly to readers, and to publish discoverable, structured credibility data for wider use. Ultimately, readers could interact with content using tools that harness credibility data from sources they trust, like specific news sources, fact-checking services, or communities of experts.
  5. May 2018
    1. Neither study, however, focuses on how faculty are revising OER, and overall there is little research in the extant literature on the degree to which faculty or students are revising OER, how they are doing so, and what impact this may have on student learning outcomes.
  6. Feb 2018
    1. You may not copy any material accessed through this Website except to download, view or save to hard disk or diskette and store or print out single copies of individual search results for your own personal and non-commercial use, scholarly, educational or scientific research or study

      Copyright.

  7. Mar 2017
    1. blending technology with teachers to support interactive learning, exploration, and creation (instead of “drill and kill” techniques) leads to higher engagement and learning gains

      collabs with teachers

    2. digital technologies offer learners greater opportunities to be more actively involved in the learning experience.

      research opps.

    1. individual's interpretation of that policy

      AUP connections to individual / institutional variance in Fair Use / Copyright interpretations relevant here as well.

  8. Jan 2017
  9. Nov 2016
    1. Strictly speaking, this is true. No jurisdiction can be legally compelled to designate a Priority Development Area. The region’s 191 PDAs were all nominated by local jurisdictions. San Francisco’s PDAs were unanimously approved by the Board of Supervisors in 2007.

      And yet, earlier in this article, the process is criticized for being undemocratic. Which is it, dude?

  10. Oct 2016
    1. FORMOREINFORMATION

      The author provides additional resources and citations. What does that tell you? How might you use these?

    2. U.S.EnergyInformationAdministration

      Had you considered using government sources for your research? http://www.eia.gov/

    3. AmericanWindEnergyAssociation

      Had you heard of this association before? http://www.awea.org/

    4. April1,2011

      This report was published in 2011. What does that mean to you?

    5. THEISSUES

      Notice these headings.

      Does it remind you of other sources? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_power

      What does that tell you about the type of source?

      If this were your topic, how might you use these headings and sections to help your research?

    1. enewable and Sustainable EnergyReviews

      Journal title

    2. RenewableEnergy
    3. enewable and Sustainable EnergyReviews

      The author cites this journal twice. Maybe investigate the journal for related articles or to determine credibility. http://www.sciencedirect.com.colorado.idm.oclc.org/science/journal/13640321

    4. References

      Might you look up any of these sources? If so why? how?

    5. As such it is likely that publicperceptions and responses will continue to be of crucialimportance.

      What does this tell you about the ongoing questions around this issue?

  11. Sep 2016
    1. Responsible Use

      Again, this is probably a more felicitous wording than “privacy protection”. Sure, it takes as a given that some use of data is desirable. And the preceding section makes it sound like Learning Analytics advocates mostly need ammun… arguments to push their agenda. Still, the notion that we want to advocate for responsible use is more likely to find common ground than this notion that there’s a “data faucet” that should be switched on or off depending on certain stakeholders’ needs. After all, there exists a set of data use practices which are either uncontroversial or, at least, accepted as “par for the course” (no pun intended). For instance, we probably all assume that a registrar should receive the grade data needed to grant degrees and we understand that such data would come from other sources (say, a learning management system or a student information system).

  12. Jul 2016
  13. May 2016
    1. The case for print

      Not either/or for sure. Continuing to equate OER with traditional textbooks vastly constrains the power of OER and open education. How about helping students develop the skills and use the tools to work with digital media in much more powerful ways than is possible with paper?

  14. Mar 2016
    1. At the core of the personal API is the radical mission to put control over data (and its access) in the hands of students. This is both a pedagogical act and a creative opportunity, informing students that they can access their own information as well as create interfaces to do with that data what they please. It gives them a seat at the tables where the edtech powers sit, moving them one step closer to a status of equality rather than that of a passive consumer.
  15. Feb 2016
    1. After administering the marijuana, the research team gauged each participant’s ability to complete cognitive tasks that included two types of creative thinking. The first task: "Think of as many uses as you can for a pen"

      After reading what these researchers think is a test of the creative thinking that is the subject of this study, I can think of one use for the pen that involves the phrase, "...and put it where the sun don't shine!"

      P.S. And as a proud owner of a Mya-Moe ukulele, I am disturbed at the article's theme-image implication that we ukulele players are a bunch of joint-honking, creativity-lacking slackers, the Millennial equivalent of Beat Poets!

      P.P.S. Upon further reflection, it has been brought to my attention that the tiny instrument in the article's theme image has, in fact, six strings not four. This then puts into question the appropriateness of my outrage over the article's apparent disparagement of ukulele players. Fair enough, it may be a small bodied guitar. But it may also be a six-string ukulele, depending on its tuning.

      I am inclined to go with it being a six-string uke, but am reserving my outrage until we have further evidence to go on.

      If you have an opinion about whether said instrument is guitar or ukulele... OR if you'd care to comment on whether creativity can be measured by things like the "pen use test," annotate away in response, please.

    1. Searches for tortoise food web and area meteorological data in the region at the DataONE portal. Searches for land-use histories, especially for former grazing lands. Searches for co-locality data for other animal species as possible signals for other ecological changes in the region.
  16. Oct 2015
  17. Aug 2015
    1. But if a URL link is for a quotation the problem disappears. Readers follow the link to the top of the sources, copy a few words of the quoted passage into the Control+F search box, and go directly to the passage cited.
    2. Using URL referencing of the kind I employ in this blog, or other innovative methods, readers should be able to go directly (in a single click and in real time) to the specific part of the full text of source that is being cited
    1. Have you seen the ContentMine project at all? I met Peter Murray Rust at a Mozilla science event a couple of months ago and the use case he discussed sounded quite similar to this - mining large numbers of papers for facts.

  18. Jul 2015
  19. Jun 2015
    1. Sec. 22a-40. Permitted operations and uses. (a) The following operations and uses shall be permitted in wetlands and watercourses, as of right:

      Rights of use for wetlands and watercourses.

    2. The preservation and protection of the wetlands and watercourses from random, unnecessary, undesirable and unregulated uses, disturbance or destruction is in the public interest and is essential to the health, welfare and safety of the citizens of the state. It is, therefore, the purpose of sections 22a-36 to 22a-45, inclusive, to protect the citizens of the state by making provisions for the protection, preservation, maintenance and use of the inland wetlands and watercourses by minimizing their disturbance and pollution; maintaining and improving water quality in accordance with the highest standards set by federal, state or local authority; preventing damage from erosion, turbidity or siltation; preventing loss of fish and other beneficial aquatic organisms, wildlife and vegetation and the destruction of the natural habitats thereof; deterring and inhibiting the danger of flood and pollution; protecting the quality of wetlands and watercourses for their conservation, economic, aesthetic, recreational and other public and private uses and values; and protecting the state's potable fresh water supplies from the dangers of drought, overdraft, pollution, misuse and mismanagement by providing an orderly process to balance the need for the economic growth of the state and the use of its land with the need to protect its environment and ecology in order to forever guarantee to the people of the state, the safety of such natural resources for their benefit and enjoyment and for the benefit and enjoyment of generations yet unborn.

      Purpose of the Inland Wetland agency.

      A. minimizing disturbance and pollution

      B. maintaining/improving water quality

      C. prevention of erosion, turbidity (soil in water), and siltation.

      D. prevention of loss of beneficial aquatic life/habitat.

      E. deterring/inhibiting floods and pollution

      F.protection for economic,aesthetic, and recreational use.

      G. protecting water resources from drought, overdraft, pollution, misuse, and mismanagement.

      H. balance between need for economic growth and protection of environment.

  20. Apr 2015
    1. Recent surveys and data, interviews with educators and industry officials, and K-12 companies' development of new products underscore the enduring, widespread demand for textbooks and other paper-based materials in the nation's schools.

      What efforts have been made to help students better interact with digital content?

    1. MOOC materials may be limited by copyright or time restrictions for re-use as open educational resources

      where in a course description this is explained ?

    1. The main important point is not to shampoo your hair too often. Depending on the culture in which you live, washing the hair no more often than every 1-4 weeks may be the best way to have healthy hair.
    1. his Web portal provides users with a flexible and expandable suite of resources to enable variant-, gene-, and exome-level sequence analysis in a secure, Web-based, and user-friendly fashion. Users can also elect to share data with other MSeqDR Consortium members, or even the general public, either by custom annotation tracks or through the use of a convenient distributed annotation system (DAS) mechanism

      Need to look into the DAS and portals like this that are annotating sequences.

  21. Feb 2014
    1. These rights are quali- fied, however, by the application of various limitations set forth in the next several sections of the Act, §§107 through 122. Those sections, typically entitled “Limitations on exclusive rights,” include, for example, the principle of “fair use” (§107), permission for limited library archival reproduction, (§108), and the doctrine at issue here, the “first sale” doctrine (§109)
      • §107 - the principle of “fair use”
      • §108 - permission for limited library archival reproduction
      • §109 - the “first sale” doctrine
  22. Sep 2013
    1. Home | Book I | Book II | Book III | Index | Bibliography Book I - Chapter 1 [1354a] Rhetoric is the counterpart of Dialectic. Both alike are concerned with such things as come, more or less, within the general ken of all men and belong to no definite science. Accordingly all men make use, more or less, of both; for to a certain extent all men attempt to discuss statements and to maintain them, to defend themselves and to attack others. Ordinary people do this either at random or through practice and from acquired habit. Both ways being possible, the subject can plainly be handled systematically, for it is possible to inquire the reason why some speakers succeed through practice and others spontaneously; and every one will at once agree that such an inquiry is the function of an art. Now, the framers of the current treatises on rhetoric have constructed but a small portion of that art. The modes of persuasion are the only true constituents of the art: everything else is merely accessory. These writers, however, say nothing about enthymemes, which are the substance of rhetorical persuasion, but deal mainly with non-essentials. The arousing of prejudice, pity, anger, and similar emotions has nothing to do with the essential facts, but is merely a personal appeal to the man who is judging the case. Consequently if the rules for trials which are now laid down some states -- especially in well-governed states -- were applied everywhere, such people would have nothing to say. All men, no doubt, think that the laws should prescribe such rules, but some, as in the court of Areopagus, give practical effect to their thoughts and forbid talk about non-essentials. This is sound law and custom. It is not right to pervert the judge by moving him to anger or envy or pity -- one might as well warp a carpenter's rule before using it. Again, a litigant has clearly nothing to do but to show that the alleged fact is so or is not so, that it has or has not happened. As to whether a thing is important or unimportant, just or unjust, the judge must surely refuse to take his instructions from the litigants: he must decide for himself all such points as the law-giver has not already defined for him. Now, it is of great moment that well-drawn laws should themselves define all the points they possibly can and leave as few as may be to the decision of the judges; and this for several reasons. First, to find one man, or a few men, who are sensible persons and [1354b] capable of legislating and administering justice is easier than to find a large number. Next, laws are made after long consideration, whereas decisions in the courts are given at short notice, which makes it hard for those who try the case to satisfy the claims of justice and expediency. The weightiest reason of all is that the decision of the lawgiver is not particular but prospective and general, whereas members of the assembly and the jury find it their duty to decide on definite cases brought before them. They will often have allowed themselves to be so much influenced by feelings of friendship or hatred or self-interest that they lose any clear vision of the truth and have their judgement obscured by considerations of personal pleasure or pain. In general, then, the judge should, we say, be allowed to decide as few things as possible. But questions as to whether something has happened or has not happened, will be or will not be, is or is not, must of necessity be left to the judge, since the lawgiver cannot foresee them. If this is so, it is evident that any one who lays down rules about other matters, such as what must be the contents of the "introduction" or the "narration" or any of the other divisions of a speech, is theorizing about non-essentials as if they belonged to the art. The only question with which these writers here deal is how to put the judge into a given frame of mind. About the orator's proper modes of persuasion they have nothing to tell us; nothing, that is, about how to gain skill in enthymemes. Hence it comes that, although the same systematic principles apply to political as to forensic oratory, and although the former is a nobler business, and fitter for a citizen, than that which concerns the relations of private individuals, these authors say nothing about political oratory, but try, one and all, to write treatises on the way to plead in court. The reason for this is that in political oratory there is less inducement to talk about nonessentials. Political oratory is less given to unscrupulous practices than forensic, because it treats of wider issues. In a political debate the man who is forming a judgement is making a decision about his own vital interests. There is no need, therefore, to prove anything except that the facts are what the supporter of a measure maintains they are. In forensic oratory this is not enough; to conciliate the listener is what pays here. It is other people's affairs that are to be decided, so that the judges, intent on their own satisfaction and listening with partiality, surrender themselves to the disputants instead of judging between them. [1355a] Hence in many places, as we have said already, irrelevant speaking is forbidden in the law-courts: in the public assembly those who have to form a judgement are themselves well able to guard against that. It is clear, then, that rhetorical study, in its strict sense, is concerned with the modes of persuasion. Persuasion is clearly a sort of demonstration, since we are most fully persuaded when we consider a thing to have been demonstrated. The orator's demonstration is an enthymeme, and this is, in general, the most effective of the modes of persuasion. The enthymeme is a sort of syllogism, and the consideration of syllogisms of all kinds, without distinction, is the business of dialectic, either of dialectic as a whole or of one of its branches. It follows plainly, therefore, that he who is best able to see how and from what elements a syllogism is produced will also be best skilled in the enthymeme, when he has further learnt what its subject-matter is and in what respects it differs from the syllogism of strict logic. The true and the approximately true are apprehended by the same faculty; it may also be noted that men have a sufficient natural instinct for what is true, and usually do arrive at the truth. Hence the man who makes a good guess at truth is likely to make a good guess at probabilities. It has now been shown that the ordinary writers on rhetoric treat of non-essentials; it has also been shown why they have inclined more towards the forensic branch of oratory. Rhetoric is useful (1) because things that are true and things that are just have a natural tendency to prevail over their opposites, so that if the decisions of judges are not what they ought to be, the defeat must be due to the speakers themselves, and they must be blamed accordingly.

      But if men tend toward the truth and speakers can convince men to the contrary, isn't rhetoric more hurtful that useful?