249 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. men

      This is (I think) the first time the document uses "men" in a non-gender-specific way outside the context of a period quote. This pre-1960s default to "men" instead of "people" continues throughout. With "republicanism", this is the second major case of a repeated imprecise, ideologically motivated language refrain.

  2. Jan 2021
  3. Dec 2020
    1. I saw him and was astounded. 33I loved him as a woman, 34falling upon him in embrace. 35I took him and made him 36my brother.” 37The mother of Gilgamish she that knows all things 38[said unto Gilgamish:—] ................................... [213] COL. II 1that he may join with thee in endeavor.” 2(Thus) Gilgamish solves (his) dream. 3Enkidu sitting before the hierodule

      In the time period the translation, you can tell that they had just begun to create labels on relationships, people etc to understand what they were feeling or to just recognize different people. In the text chosen, there are many different area's in the highlighted portion and throughout the text, where Gilgamesh uses labels which created for a clear story. It is however conflicting because of the translators and them maybe having included different sections so that the story makes sense. Nonetheless, when he said that he loved him like he would a woman, that shows how the language at the time was advanced, closer to the current 21st century, enough to realize that Gilgamesh had romantic feelings for Enkidu. Also with the piece when the translators described him as sitting near the hierodule. The slave, prostitute (both) was able to be identified no matter of the gender. Looking back at the time, it is still demeaning when thinking in our 21st century mindset and what we consider normal. However looking back, it is interesting to see how advanced the ancient Iraq civilization operated. It is also amazing seeing where the women of this country came from as in today's world the women now being able to be involved with the government, they are making it a mission so Iraqi women know their rights (Calabrese, John, et al).

      CC BY-SA

      Calabrese, John, et al. “Constitutional and Legal Rights of Iraqi Women.” Middle East Institute, 8 Dec. 2020, mei.edu/publications/constitutional-and-legal-rights-iraqi-women.

    1. No tech team or web guy needed!There are no complicated steps or approvals from managers and your IT department when it comes to marketing your podcast.

      This seems painfully gendered. RadioPublic could do better.

    1. If known, have you used the pronouns the individual uses to describe themselves in your story?

      This is wrong. An individual doesn't use any pronouns to describe themselves: pronouns are what others use to refer to a third party, usually when they are not present. An individual may prefer, ask or demand others to use specific words to use when referring to them, but no one has any power to compel anyone - nor should they.

    2. If an individual is granted a full GRC they will, from the date of issue, be considered in the eyes of the law to be of their acquired gender.

      This is incorrect. The Gender Recognition Act gives a number of exceptions to the holder of a Gender Recognition Certificate being considered as of the 'acquired gender' as specified on her/his Gender Recognition Certificate.

      The Equality Act 2010 provides additional exemptions, eg the right to single-sex services.

    3. The Gender Recognition Act 2004 enables transgender people to apply to the Gender Recognition Panel

      This presumes a definition of 'transgender', which is a term that is not used or even defined in the Gender Recognition Act 2004.

      It would be more accurate to say that the GRA provides a way for anyone who fulfils the criteria in the GRA to obtain a Gender Recognition Certificate.

  4. icla2020b.jonreeve.com icla2020b.jonreeve.com
    1. Mrs. Mooney

      I wonder why she's still being referred to (and sort of identified) as Mrs. Mooney, even though she divorced him and clearly moved on with her life. doesn't sound like she's looking to carry his family name..

  5. Nov 2020
    1. Resumiendo mi argumento: he tratado demostrar cómo y por qué el género, la clase y la "raza" desempeñan un papel crucial e interrelacionado en la constitución y perpetuación de la sociedad de clases, una sociedad que es a la vez profundamente desigual y contradictoria.
    2. Harding recientemente ha llamado la atención sobre la intersección entre el género y la raza para señalar cómo estas diferentes estructuras de dominación afectan a las mujeres y a los hombres o a blancos en contraste con negros de modos particulares: "... en culturas estratificadas tanto por el género como por la raza, el género siempre resulta ser también una categoría racial y la raza una categoría de género"
    3. Judith Shapiro, ya a principios de la década de los ochenta, se percató de las dificultades conceptuales que entraña el separar género de sexo: "[el sexo y el géne-ro] sirven a un propósito analítico útil al contraponer un conjunto de hechos biológicos a un conjunto de hechos culturales. Si quisiera ser escrupulosa en el uso de los tér-minos, utilizaría la palabra 'sexo' sólo cuando hablase de diferencias biológicas entre machos y hembras, y usaría 'género' siempre que me refiriese a las construcciones sociales, culturales y psicológicas que se imponen a esas diferencias biológicas [...] El género [...] designa un conjunto de categorías que podemos denominar con la mis-ma etiqueta a nivel interlingüístico o intercultural, pues éste está relacionado de alguna manera con diferencias de sexo. No obstante, estas categorías son convencionales o arbitrarias en la medida en que no se pueden reducir a o derivar de forma directa de hechos naturales, biológicos; difieren de una lengua a otra, de una cultura a otra, en el modo como organizan la experiencia y la acción"
  6. Oct 2020
  7. mitpressonpubpub.mitpress.mit.edu mitpressonpubpub.mitpress.mit.edu
    1. I’ve actively participated in a revisionist sort of annotation that is part redaction/part revision in that I have gone through digital copies of some children’s books and in cases where it didn’t matter if the main character was male, I would actively use book editing software to make all the lead characters female for the sake of reading to girls. Often I’ve done this while reading out loud, but around the 1st/2nd grade level when children begin to read for themselves, physical annotations/revisions are required.
    1. The title of her essay “White Privilege and Male Privilege: A Personal Account of Coming to See Correspondences Through Work in Women’s Studies” was a mouthful. McIntosh listed 46 ways white privilege is enacted.
    1. Student evaluations of teachers are notoriously biased against women, with women routinely receiving lower scores than their male counterparts.

      I recall some work on this sort of gender bias in job recommendations as well. Remember to dig it up for reference as well.

    1. The hysterical passion

      The way I read this, what got Franklin into a large portion of this trouble in the first place was brushing Rachel's earlier behavior off as "hysterics" instead of recognizing that she had genuine reason for being upset with him. It seems he hasn't learned this lesson though, because he is still characterizing her passion as hysterical (a word which we know is extremely loaded with assumptions about the female body and lack of emotional control and strength). Ironically, it seems that Rachel has been very in control of herself and what she reveals for this whole narrative, whereas Franklin (SPOILER ALERT) was the one who was out of his own control at the pivotal moment of the text.

  8. Sep 2020
    1. “I am charmed to see you, Godfrey,” she said, addressing him, I grieve to add, in the off-hand manner of one young man talking to another.

      I find it to be really interesting that there is such an explicit flipping of gendered behavior in this section. In Victorian literature young women are often criticized for being "un-ladylike", but I don't often see that taken so far as to actually compare their behaviors to men. Later, in Bruff's section, there is also a comment about Rachel withdrawing into herself in a way that is more common amongst men (according to Bruff). It seems that there is some sort of traditionally masculine quality to Rachel that characters either are drawn to or scandalized by.

    2. It isn’t their fault (poor wretches!) that they act first and think afterwards; it’s the fault of the fools who humour them.

      This is pretty bold coming from a man who just pinned Sergeant Cuff to the wall in a moment of anger a few pages ago. I think there are a lot of behaviors that Betteredge identifies as feminine that he himself exhibits throughout the novel (this being one example). At several points in the novel he comments on the nosiness of the women servants, but he himself is snooping around and gossiping for his entire narrative. Additionally, in the power dynamics of the house, he is in a subservient position to "his Lady" and Rachel who, in the absence of a man in the family, are the masters of the house.

    3. so good

      (Similar to what Meredith said earlier, I think?) This is the second time this chapter that Betteredge has referred to Lady Verinder as “so good” to do something. What’s his relationship with her supposed to be? Equally mysterious? Somewhere between love, respect, attracted, and reverent? Their dynamic seems to me to be some kind of commentary on gender roles/dynamics as he worships her, is her most trusted/special servant, yet is her servant/employee whom she refers to by his first name.

    1. yet when I thought of my beloved Elizabeth, of her tears and endless sorrow, when she should find her lover so barbarously snatched from her, tears, the first I had shed for many months, streamed from my eyes,

      It's interesting to me that Victor only cries when thinking of how upset Elizabeth is going to be when he's the one who's going to die. He fits the whole "man be rational and women emotional" cultural phenomenon of the time to a tee. He's stone faced going into losing battle, but Elizabeth will be just soooooooooo sad and sooooooooo sorrowful. While I'm on the topic, the characterization of Elizabeth TOTALLY fits in while the "passive wife who's in charge of the emotional side of family," to a point where Mary Shelley is a satirist. Also the use of barbarous to describe the Creature is just textbook Othering in the way that demotes the Creature to a irrational and animalistic creature.

  9. Aug 2020
  10. Jul 2020
  11. journals.sagepub.com journals.sagepub.com
    1. Sorokowska, A., Sorokowski, P., Hilpert, P., Cantarero, K., Frackowiak, T., Ahmadi, K., Alghraibeh, A. M., Aryeetey, R., Bertoni, A., Bettache, K., Blumen, S., Błażejewska, M., Bortolini, T., Butovskaya, M., Castro, F. N., Cetinkaya, H., Cunha, D., David, D., David, O. A., … Pierce, J. D. (2017). Preferred Interpersonal Distances: A Global Comparison. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 48(4), 577–592. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022022117698039

  12. Jun 2020
  13. journals.sagepub.com journals.sagepub.com
    1. Sorokowska, A., Sorokowski, P., Hilpert, P., Cantarero, K., Frackowiak, T., Ahmadi, K., Alghraibeh, A. M., Aryeetey, R., Bertoni, A., Bettache, K., Blumen, S., Błażejewska, M., Bortolini, T., Butovskaya, M., Castro, F. N., Cetinkaya, H., Cunha, D., David, D., David, O. A., … Pierce, J. D. (2017). Preferred Interpersonal Distances: A Global Comparison. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 48(4), 577–592. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022022117698039

  14. May 2020
  15. Apr 2020
  16. Mar 2020
  17. Feb 2020
    1. dear

      Little Red is not dear in the 2015 version of Little Red Riding Hood published by Parragon Books. Dear is replaced by sweet,