94 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2021
  2. Jul 2021
    1. Rodolfo: Literally, I spoke to a person who said, “Man, if I do bad things here they're going to want to keep me here.” What type of mentality is that? That they rather commit crimes while in detention so they can stay in the United States but not even that, they are going to be locked up.Rodolfo: So, that reality, that part where their mind has set on, “Okay well, I'd rather be in jail here then go back to my home country. Because I'm going to be, at least, with my family here, so they can go visit me and stuff like that.” That's very.., that's horrible. So yeah, that. That would be awesome if somebody is in detention, if somebody is detained, they can get visits from their family. Just people who are detained, you know?Sergio: Just wanting to hug your mom—Rodolfo: Yeah. Because a visit does all the difference, man. You know what I mean? Seeing that little help, it's like a beacon of hope, you know? Okay, well, one day or hopefully or just keeping that alive.Sergio: I think that's all the questions I have right now, I might come up with more later to ask you again. But right now, do you have anything on your mind that you want to share or talk about?Rodolfo: Man, it's been awhile since I spoke about any of this, but I feel I've let everything... or for now because I have a lot, a lot more. But for now, I feel like it was good. It's like a little therapy session as well, man. Honestly, to be quite frank with you, that's what I was looking for, man. Because I don't really have any friends like that, and I don't know anybody out here like that and it's just great to finally speak and be heard.Rodolfo: I know it's your job and I know it's your school and everything but man, I feel like you really were listening to me and thank you. Thank you man, really.

      Reflections; Feelings, Hope

    1. Anne: What was family life like with you and your brother and your mother and father? Did you guys speak English at home? Did you do American things, activities? Do they work a lot? Tell me a little bit about family life.Juan: Right now, my dad, he's always been the boss of the family. He's always worked, he works in construction, and as you know, Utah, with the climate change, it snows, it rains, all of the climates. Since he works in construction, he does work outside all the time, so even if it snows or even if it rains, even if it's minus five degrees outside, he still goes out and works because nobody's going to give him the money to provide for his family.Juan: In a way, my dad, you can say he's one of those hard working men who doesn't look out for himself, but rather looks out for his family. In my house we spoke Spanish all the time because of my mom. To this day, she doesn't want to learn English even though we tell her to learn English. My little sister, she doesn't speak Spanish, she speaks more English and with her it's different. We tell her, "You have to learn Spanish because it's going to help you," but she doesn't want to learn.Anne: Is she a citizen?Juan: Yes, she was born in the US. So my parents didn't really adapt to the American culture. They always wanted to follow Mexican traditions, even when it's Mother's Day over there … I think here it's May 10th but over there, when is Mother's Day?Anne: I think it's the second Sunday of May, so it could be different days.Juan: We could take that as an example. They'd rather follow Mother's Day here in Mexico than over there. Also Christmas, I guess the one thing they did adapt to was Thanksgiving. We don't celebrate that here in Mexico, but they do celebrate there, and they did adapt that. Another thing, Easter day. You go out with your family, you hide the eggs as a tradition, no? They adapted to that, but here in Mexico they don't do that. They don't even know about that. In a way they wanted to keep their Mexican culture alive even though they were in the US, but they also wanted to adapt to the things that they did there.

      Time in the US, Homelife, Mexican traditions, Holidays, Spanish language, US traditions, Holidays

    1. Claudia: My first question for you is why did you or your family decide to leave Mexico, and how did you cross the border?Yosell: Let’s see. I think I was about three or four months old when I crossed the border the first time. It was just, you're going to cross the border, and so I crossed the border through, it was TJ [Tijuana] at the time. And I was living in San Francisco for maybe like two years. After that, from what my dad tells me, and to what I remember, we were just moving around the U.S., and quite a couple of places.Yosell: From what I do remember, I used to live in Vegas with an aunt there. I was doing my elementary school and then after that I moved out to Utah and started doing a little bit of my middle school and after that I was kind of moving around a lot of places, I guess just working—my dad got me a job working for construction. And I was doing my high school online, a kind of homeschool thing. That was pretty interesting. I would come back to Mexico quite often. I would kind of just jump the border and come see my mom, and then I jumped it again.Claudia: And you would go back?Yosell: Yeah.Claudia: How many times did you say that you did that?Yosell: Six or eight times just jumping it.Claudia: You were over there without your parents or anybody?Yosell: With my dad. I was already with my dad.Claudia: How did it feel to be separated from your mom?Yosell: I don't know if it would be a big thing since I was always kind of with my dad, and I would see my mom almost every... I would come back every Mother's Day or Christmas kind of thing. Come back to see her, and then I would just basically just jump it again. Since dad knew people that would cross the border quite often, that's where they would do it.

      Mexico before the US, Migration from Mexico, Reasons, Economic, Family Relationships, Those who stayed in Mexico, Those who were in the US

  3. Jun 2021
    1. Luisa: I told my mom about this and I remember vividly having a conversation with her and telling her, "Hey, you know what? This is happening at school," but I think my mom was going through so much stuff that she didn't know how to deal with it or she didn't … there wasn't enough of my mom to go around back then. I know now. I forgive her, but certain things … [Pause] I forgive her a lot for it now because I get it. It was extremely traumatizing. She had a lot of health issues and then this man who was her entire world just dumped her aside and she had to leave her whole life behind and everything she knew, all the comforts and work. She had never worked in her life [Chuckles]. I respect my mother a lot. She started going to design school for designing clothes and it’s pretty great.

      Time in the US, Homelife

    2. My mom, she started working for this store [unclear] and she was doing her design school, and they specialized in Muslim attire and my mom was like, "You know what? I'm going to be independent," so she moves aside. She starts her own thing, and she starts making a bunch of clothes.

      Time in the US - family - mother employment - designer

    3. I respect my mother a lot. She started going to design school for designing clothes and it’s pretty great.

      Homelife - mother starts working - employment

    4. Within three to six months. It didn't take that long … immediately kind of. I think one of my uncles took it upon himself to take care of us, and since my mom … my mom at the time, we did not know she had a tumor in the back of her brain. Right where her brain stem is, she had a huge tumor there and we had no idea. Nobody knew. She doesn't remember a lot of this. I don't know if it's because of the emotional trauma or because of the tumor, but once we got to Chicago, it was evident that something was wrong with my mother and she started going to the doctor.

      Homelife - family taking care of each other Mother and need for medical intervention

    1. I used to give my mom crap about that, because I was like, "Why couldn't you just start your life right here? What's so wrong about this? That you put us through all this stuff that we have nothing over there?" And then I realized when I came over here—I actually cried, because I'm like, "Damn, she did all that for us to have a better life."

      Time in the US - Family

    2. Slowly I started saying because of one decision that she had made, all our lives got messed up, even if she wanted to or not, point blank period. But then I didn't think on both sides.

      Time in US - homelife - family - mother - anger

    3. And I liked it, because my parents would have to suffer. That's the sucky thing about it. Looking back at it now, I put my mom through a lot of stuff, and it sucks.

      Time in US - Homelife - family

    4. I could see them--that they were advancing in life, and I was still in the same spot. So I asked my mom if I could get a job, and that's when she broke it down to me that I wasn't even from here. And that was right there like a slap in the face.

      Time in US - immigration status - being secretive - lost opportunities

  4. May 2021
  5. Mar 2021
  6. Feb 2021
  7. Oct 2020
    1. Tell her to wear that sweet hat she had on last Sunday

      I know it's not really a part of the party, but interesting how the mother said she wanted to be completely hands off for the party but then tells Kitty what to wear. Laura's use of the phrase "you're to wear" makes it sound not like a suggestion but a mandate.

    1. Murder in murder ballads cannot be concealed for long and through the course of the ballad, there is always something that reveals the murder. In many folk ballads this is something that happens naturally but in a few this is revealed through supernatural means. This motif is called “murder will out”.

      The specific folk ballads outlined in this paper that have an element of supernatural that is instrumental in revealing the murder are the Twa Sisters (Child 10), Sir Hugh (Child 155), Young Hunting (Child 68), and Young Benjie (Child 86).

      “In the Scottish "Binorie" versions, for instance, the body is recovered from the water and buried without any further allusion to the murder. In North American versions, the younger sister's body is eventually found, but frequently not before she has already been fished out, still alive, by a miller who has seen her floating in his milldam, robbed her of her money or jewelry, and then thrown her back in to drown.”

  8. Aug 2020
  9. Jul 2020
  10. May 2020
  11. Dec 2019
    1. the inv1_045fant Elizabeth, the only child of his deceased siste

      As Victor's cousin, Elizabeth will also play other family roles as "sister," substitute "mother," and finally "wife." In 1831 Mary Shelley changed Elizabeth's role into that of a foundling, unrelated to Victor by blood. Some modern critics believe this 1831 change avoids the possibility of incest in the 1818 novel and makes the later novel more conservative in implication. For the first arguments of this kind, see Ellen Moers, "Female Gothic: The Monster's Mother," The New York Review of Books, 21, no. 4 (March 21, 1974) and "Female Gothic: Monsters, Goblins, and Freaks," The New York Review of Books, 21, no. 5 (April 4, 1974).

    2. Elizabeth, my love, you must supply my place to your younger cousins

      With Victor's mother's death, her wish for Elizabeth to assume her motherly role begins a series of symbolic family roles that Elizabeth will occupy: mother to the children, "my more than sister" to Victor, and eventually wife to Victor.

    3. her features appeared to change, and I thought that I held the corpse of my dead mother in my arms

      Victor's intensely morbid association of Elizabeth with his dead mother, prefigured by his mother's death from scarlet fever in Chapter 1 of Book 1, associates his act of creating the Creature (whom he has just witnessed for the first time) with this disturbing disruption of the "domestic affections."

  12. Apr 2018
    1. “Certain things in life you haveto accept, you know, that you have to live with—thatyou can’t do anything about it.” Thinking that life is astruggle for all women they knew reinforced the needfor private suffering

      what things did the queen go through in her life that could've been tramautic. The queen is the first one (maybe) to talk about her mother and the struggle of being her own gender. She curses her father immediately because of what he's done to her mother.

      Our first introduction of her is her dwelling on the struggle that she (sarah) goes through as a woman. mourns her beautful mother and dehumanizes her father.

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  13. Mar 2018
    1. Under such expectations, it was sometimes difficult for a strong woman torally the support of family for a divorce or to critically examine the physi-cal, economic, and emotional costs of “keeping your head above water...regardless of what your husband or boyfriend is putting you through” (36,widowed mother). A commitment to the discourse of strength and its atten-dant construction of a good Black woman thus could mask over realities ofinfidelity, marital disappointment, and being “treated... like dirt

      The marriage between the mother and father crumpled and the mother slowly lost her mind and her hair.

    2. Dwelling on pains and fears was seen as weakening a woman and makingher less than capable of surviving the battle that her life was supposed tobe.

      Sarah's mother was the opposite. she constantly dwelled on her pains and voiced them to her daughter. if not literally passing on the same painand eventual demise

  14. Nov 2017
    1. See also: Toxoplasmosis- AAPOS

      What are the symptoms of newly acquired toxoplasmosis in an adult?

      More than 80% of newly infected persons experience no symptoms, and are unlikely to be aware of the infection.

      Symptoms may occur following an incubation period of one to two weeks after exposure and include:

      *mild fever

      *swollen glands

      *malaise

      *muscle and/or joint pain

      *headache

      *sore throat, and

      *skin rash.

      *Eye symptoms may include blurred vision or floaters during active disease.

      The diagnosis can be confirmed by detecting antibodies to Toxoplasma in the blood. Swelling of the liver or spleen may be noted, and in rare cases the lungs, brain, liver, or heart may be involved. The condition usually resolves without treatment within a few months.

  15. May 2017
    1. frost heave
      Before the understanding of frost heave, there was a widely held belief that rocks and stones could grow and multiply. Stones were believe to grow from small pebbles. These stones then rose to the surface of the ground. Another belief was that stones were the offspring of “mother-stones” or “breeding-stones.” Today, it is known that this motion of stones moving upwards toward the surface of the ground is due to frost heave. Frost heave occurs when water in soil or rock freezes and thaws in a cyclic process. This causes an upward movement of the surface of the ground due to the freezing of water underneath. Geologist Stephen Taber from the University of South Carolina proved through extensive research that “it was not expansion, but rather the formation of ice lenses by segregation of water from the soil as the ground freezes that is the principal cause of frost heave.” He also showed that liquids other than water can also cause frost heave. The direction of heave is governed by the growth of ice lenses. Ice lenses form perpendicular to the direction of heat flow, so it is not always the case that frost heave occurs in the path of least resistance (Manz, 2011). 
      

      References

      Manz, L. (2011). Frost Heave. Geo News, 18-23.

  16. Jan 2017
    1. People say that the 1968 Fall Joint Computer Conference in San Francisco was a watershed. After seeing your demonstration, people left that room never thinking about computers the same way again. Would you say that's an accurate encapsulation?

      Reception of the Mother of All Demos

  17. Oct 2015
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  21. Mar 2015
  22. Feb 2015
  23. Jan 2015