165 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Jed Kolko. (2021, February 8). Nice healthy jump in @indeed US job postings: +2.4% above pre-pandemic baseline as of Feb 5. Was +0.7% one week earlier, on Jan 29. Accelerating improvement! 1.7 %pt weekly gain is similar to last summer’s recovery pace. (Just a chart this week, no blogpost.) https://t.co/62FENliwdD [Tweet]. @JedKolko. https://twitter.com/JedKolko/status/1358887964697264132

  2. Apr 2021
    1. The role of the terminal emulator process is:

      Shows the relationship between a "terminal emulator" and a pseudoterminal, as alluded to in the intro:

      is a pair of pseudo-devices, one of which, the slave, emulates a hardware text terminal device, the other of which, the master, provides the means by which a terminal emulator process controls the slave.

  3. Mar 2021
    1. JavaScript needs to fly from its comfy nest, and learn to survive on its own, on equal terms with other languages and run-times. It’s time to grow up, kid.
    2. If JavaScript were detached from the client and server platforms, the pressure of being a monoculture would be lifted — the next iteration of the JavaScript language or run-time would no longer have to please every developer in the world, but instead could focus on pleasing a much smaller audience of developers who love JavaScript and thrive with it, while enabling others to move to alternative languages or run-times.
    1. Source maps are on my radar, but i'm playing catchup. See: #124 (comment) for a rundown of where we are right now. Source maps are a pretty big project, it's not li
  4. Feb 2021
    1. Maintaining the builds of your repositories should be everyone’s job. Instead of relying on that one build person in the team, Travis CI makes infrastructure and configuration a team responsibility.
    1. If you ask my former students, they will tell you that as a teacher, my goal is to do nothing. I dream of the day when I can sit at my desk, feet propped up, reading a book, while the classroom bursts with activity and learning around me.
    1. Flexbox's strength is in its content-driven model. It doesn't need to know the content up-front. You can distribute items based on their content, allow boxes to wrap which is really handy for responsive design, you can even control the distribution of negative space separately to positive space.
    1. There is one situation where iframes are (almost) required: when the contents of the iframe is in a different domain, and you have to perform authentication or check cookies that are bound to that domain. It actually prevents security problems instead of creating them. For example, if you're writing a kind of plugin that can be used on any website, but the plugin has to authenticate on another domain, you could create a seamless iframe that runs and authenticates on the external domain.
    1. I normally try to figure out if that's a good solution for the problem before resorting to iframes. Sometimes, however, an iframe just does the job better. It maintains its own browser history, helps you segregate CSS styles if that's an issue with the content you're loading in.
  5. Jan 2021
    1. Ubuntu also supports ‘snap’ packages which are more suited for third-party applications and tools which evolve at their own speed, independently of Ubuntu. If you want to install a high-profile app like Skype or a toolchain like the latest version of Golang, you probably want the snap because it will give you fresher versions and more control of the specific major versions you want to track.
  6. Nov 2020
    1. I wouldn't use Flutter for web, mobile is good though.
    2. It's super promising for web apps, just maybe not for web pages. I went from React to Svelte to Flutter for my current app project, and every step felt like a major upgrade.Flutter provides the best developer experience bar none, and I think it also has the potential to provide the best user experience. But probably only for PWAs, which users are likely to install anyway. Or other self-contained experiences, like Facebook games. It does have some Flash vibes, but is far more suitable for proper app development than Flash ever was while still feeling more like a normal website to the average user. It won't be the right choice for everything, but I believe it will be for a lot of things.
    3. I also find that a lot of the complexity of Flutter can be avoided, and I mostly use it to define the UI as a more app-centric alternative to HTML/CSS.

      I mostly use it to define the UI as a more app-centric alternative to HTML/CSS.

    4. Svelte by itself is great, but doing a complete PWA (with service workers, etc) that runs and scales on multiple devices with high quality app-like UI controls quickly gets complex. Flutter just provides much better tooling for that out of the box IMO. You are not molding a website into an app, you are just building an app. If I was building a relatively simple web app that is only meant to run on the web, then I might still prefer Svelte in some cases.
    1. Most of our staff could be making much more money at a company driven by profit, but they choose to work for a non-profit powered by a huge mission. Hiring and retaining this kind of talent is imperative to our mission.
    1. Some of these values are suited for development and some for production. For development you typically want fast Source Maps at the cost of bundle size, but for production you want separate Source Maps that are accurate and support minimizing.
  7. Oct 2020
    1. Sometimes we can’t implement a solution that’s fully spec-compliant, and in those cases using a polyfill might be the wrong answer. A polyfill would translate into telling the rest of the codebase that it’s okay to use the feature, that it’ll work just like in modern browsers, but it might not in edge cases.
    1. One of the primary tasks of engineers is to minimize complexity. JSX changes such a fundamental part (syntax and semantics of the language) that the complexity bubbles up to everything it touches. Pretty much every pipeline tool I've had to work with has become far more complex than necessary because of JSX. It affects AST parsers, it affects linters, it affects code coverage, it affects build systems. That tons and tons of additional code that I now need to wade through and mentally parse and ignore whenever I need to debug or want to contribute to a library that adds JSX support.
  8. Sep 2020
  9. Aug 2020
    1. Altig, D., Baker, S. R., Barrero, J. M., Bloom, N., Bunn, P., Chen, S., Davis, S. J., Leather, J., Meyer, B. H., Mihaylov, E., Mizen, P., Parker, N. B., Renault, T., Smietanka, P., & Thwaites, G. (2020). Economic Uncertainty Before and During the COVID-19 Pandemic (Working Paper No. 27418; Working Paper Series). National Bureau of Economic Research. https://doi.org/10.3386/w27418

    1. Then when giving answers I'm even less certain. For example I see occasional how-to questions which (IMO) are ridiculously complex in bash, awk, sed, etc. but trivial in python, (<10 lines, no non-standard libraries). On such questions I wait and see if other answers are forthcoming. But if they get no answers, I'm not sure if I should give my 10 lines of python or not.
    2. I went against the grain, applying other tools that people have written over the years to directly perform the job at hand which do not involve entering a program for awk or a shell to run, with answers like https://unix.stackexchange.com/a/574309/5132 and https://unix.stackexchange.com/a/578242/5132 . Others have done similar. https://unix.stackexchange.com/a/584274/5132 and https://unix.stackexchange.com/a/569600/5132 are (for examples) answers that show alternative tools to answers employing shell script and (yet again) awk programs, namely John A. Kunze's jot and rs (reshape), which have been around since 4.2BSD for goodness' sake!
    3. There is an observable widespread tendency to give an awk answer to almost everything, but that should not be inferred as a rule to be followed, and if there's (say) a Python answer that involves less programming then surely that is quite on point as an answer for a readership of users.
    1. Java may have been designed as a completely object oriented language, but when Java SE 8 was released in 2014, it added Lambda expressions (aka closures), which added some functional programming elements. Not every problem is best served by OOP, and by adding Lambdas, Java became more flexible. 
  10. Jul 2020
    1. Ruby has some really nice libraries for working with linked data. These libraries allow you to work with the data in both a graph and resource-oriented fashion, allowing a developer to use the techniques that best suit his or her use cases and skills.
  11. Jun 2020
    1. Internally, we are continuing to encourage any employee who needs time and space to process current events or participate in protests should they choose to take sick time so that it doesn’t impact their personal paid-time off.
  12. May 2020
    1. Reasons You Might Want to change your job! Leave a Comment / Blog Contact If you’re planning on leaving or changing your current job, this blog is going to help you in a certain way. Given what’s going on right now, some of you might be saying that the last thing you’re thinking about is changing jobs. I totally understand. But there are companies hiring today. And they’re looking for the best talent. So, deciding whether to change or leave your job remains a very personal decision. There are three things that I would suggest to someone who’s trying to make the decision about changing jobs. I can’t answer these questions, but I do think the answers will help someone figure it out for themselves. Your job is impacting your health. First and foremost, if your job is making you physically or emotionally sick, you need to step back and think. There are jobs where risks do exist, and individuals take those roles knowing that. Jobs in health care, construction, etc. come to mind. Individuals in these industries are taking as many preventive measures as they can. Your work doesn’t make you happy anymore. This could be one of two things: 1) You love what you do but you don’t love the company (or your boss) anymore. OR 2) You’ve fallen out of love with the work. Maybe you used to love traveling as part of your job and now, not so much. It’s important to understand which one you’re dealing with. (NOTE: It’s also possible that the answer is both #1 and #2.) Your career doesn’t make financial sense. I don’t want to simply say that the job doesn’t pay enough. Because maybe the pay is fine. It’s possible that the benefits package doesn’t suit your current situation. Or the cost of maintaining your professional license is getting expensive and the company isn’t reimbursing. The question is “Does your current position adequately cover your living situation?” Once you honestly and seriously answer the above questions, it might help you decide if you want to make a change AND more importantly, what you might want to make a change to. There is some truth to the saying that the best time to look for a new job is when you have a job. I realize not everyone gets that opportunity which is why it can make some sense to always be thinking about your job wants and needs. If you’re thinking about a new opportunity, I want to give you something else to consider. Now is the time to start planning. Don’t wait until you have to make a move to start planning for it. Here are three action steps that will help you find your next job. Also, there are some other important questions that you might want to ask yourself before taking the big step : What specifically about my current situation is frustrating to me? Pinpointing the issue is the first step towards solving it. Kimberly Bishop, recruiter and chief of her eponymous career management firm based in New York, advises employees to identify how their job is failing them. Is the problem the people, the environment or the work itself? After you’ve defined the frustration, consider the scope. If you decide you’re creatively stifled, for example, you may not need to quit to fill the void. Seek an outlet outside of work or raise your hand for another department or project. Have I taken every action possible to make my current job workable? If you realize your situation is not abusive and could be manageable, consider the steps you might take to improve it. Try taking a positive attitude, altering your time management or work habits, and communicating more clearly with your manager. Perhaps a schedule change or clearing an item off your workload will make a big difference. Ultimately, what do I want for my job, career, and life? “A big mistake: When people decide to quit they think they’ll just update their resume and start networking,” says Bishop, who advises being more thoughtful about what you really want and how you’ll get there. Define your priorities. Going to law school may be intellectually stimulating but will not help you achieve the flexible schedule you’ve been craving. Similarly, if you’d like to make a career change, think about all the necessary steps. They may include more school, a pay cut, or working your way up from the bottom–again. Once you know exactly what you want, you may want to ask: How much do I want it? Have I saved enough to cover nine to 12 months of expenses? Susan Hirshman, financial planner and author of Does This Make My Assets Look Fat?, says a few years ago she told people to save enough for six months of expenses. Now she tells people they need nine to 12 months. “If you’re quitting, you won’t get unemployment,” she cautions. Hirshman suggests mapping out fixed expenses like mortgage, credit card, and loan payments, transportation, and food, as well as factoring in the “what if” costs. You may need a little extra to cushion against the unexpected, like car or appliance repairs. How might I cut expenses or earn income while between jobs? After completing a detailed budget, you may realize you’re coming up short and need to create some cash. Often, income is easily supplanted with a part-time service job. However, Hirshman warns that even waiter jobs are difficult to come by in the current economy. You only have two options: Cut expenses or bring in more money. Figure out what will work for you and be honest with yourself, Hirshman says. Have I timed this appropriately? Agryie suggests that employees who’ve decided to quit consider their timing. Firstly, are you in the midst of the busiest season or working on a big project? You may want to honor your commitments so that your team isn’t left in a bind and you’re able to leave on good terms. Secondly, “maximize the money,” he says. If you’d like to get your quarterly bonus or the holiday vacation, it might be smart to wait a few months. So after answering all these questions for yourself, you’d be able to decide if you’d want to continue with your old job or career or switch to a new one.Put together a job search plan. Grab a notebook and start plotting your strategy. Think about your skills. Make note of the knowledge and skills you want to work on before starting to interview. List your must-haves and nice-to-haves for your next company and job. Start thinking about your professional network, both online and the one on one type. Identify the resources you need. It’s possible that you would benefit from taking a class, joining a professional group, or reading some books. Make a list of everything you need and roughly how much it will cost. Start budgeting for these items. Also, think about if you will be out of work for a while and if you will need to cover health insurance in-between jobs. That needs to be budgeted as well. Ask for support. Once you have a plan, reach out to your network. Start reconnecting with them. If you’ve been doing that all along – fantastic! If you haven’t, it will take some time before you can ask for favors. Also, be sure to speak with your family and make sure they’re prepared to support you through this transition. Changing jobs will impact them too. Regardless of where you are in your career and what’s going on in the economy, the job search process is hard. It takes time. The best suggestions I can give someone is to think about why you’re considering a change and create a plan to get from where you are to where you see yourself. The worst thing someone can do is react too quickly and find themselves in another toxic workplace. I know that the current work situation is tough but remember it’s tough you know. Have a plan and work the plan out. You’ll definitely succeed. All the best!

      A job change is a big decision and requires a good consideration. We are here to give reasons why you might want to change the job.