38 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2019
    1. Of course, as organizations disolve and mutate, there is nothing to stop one organization from taking over the support of  the archives another.  Forthis purpose, it would be very useful to have a syntax for putting a date into a domain name.  This would allow a system to find an archive server.  Imaging that, failing to find "info.cern.ch", one could search back and find an entry "info.cern.ch.1994" which pointed to www.w3.org as a current server holding archive information for info.cern.ch as it was in 1994, with, of course,  pointers to newer versions of the documents.

      This document talks about content negotiation being used to request an audio version of a resource, no protocol-level negotiation of time versioning appears here.

  2. Mar 2017
    1. What’s more, when COP21 negotiators were asked about how confident they were in their scientific understandings of temperature rise, they showed no more confidence than the MBA students they were tested against. While it’s one thing to have a group of over-confident (probably millennial) MBA students, it’s another to have international climate negotiators reporting an average confidence level of about 4 out of 7 in their own understandings of temperature rise. 

      For me, this is not surprising, but rather a beautiful example of the Dunning-Kruger Effect. (Graph)

      They know the amount of uncertainty and lack of predictability of the severity. And they are equally sure of the trajectory of failure.

  3. Sep 2016
    1. “We introduce ourselves with the pronouns we use and explain why that’s done,” they said. “Literally from the day that students step on campus for the first time, we want them to know about nonbinary pronouns and that we are not going to assume their pronouns.”

      Explaining the pronouns you want to use in social interactions.

  4. Mar 2014
    1. If, however,it is true that they are engaged in such activities and what you, O king, have heard has a basis in fact, then you can see how unwisely you acted when you forced me to leave the coast.

      Hdt. 5.106 Histiaios asks to be returned to Miletus under the pretense of securing the rebelling cities. While he himself was the one who told Aristagoras to revolt in the first place 498 BCE.

    2. he called before him Histiaeus the Milesian

      Hdt. 5.106 Darius confronts Histiaios about the rebellion of provinces started by Aristagoras in Miletus (Histaios' former governorship) 498 BCE.

    3. Artaphrenes, however, bade them receive Hippias back, if they wanted to be safe.

      Hdt. 5.96 Artaphrenes responds to the pleas of the Athenians with an ultimatum commanding the Athenians to take Hippias back as their tyrant, 500 BCE.

    4. While Hippias was engaged in these activities, the Athenians heard of it and sent messengers to Sardis, warning the Persians not to believe banished Athenians.

      Hdt. 5.96 Athenians sent a message to Artaphrenes in order to dissuade the Persians from believing or helping Athenian exiles (like Hippias), 500 BCE.

    5. but Hippias, having come from Lacedaemon into Asia, left no stone unturned, maligning the Athenians to Artaphrenes, and doing all he could to bring Athens into subjection to himself and Darius.

      Hdt. 5.96 Hippias, the deposed tyrant of Athens, seeks help in re-securing power in Athens from Artaphrenes, the governor of Sardis (half brother to Darius)

    6. Then, desiring to make an alliance with the Persians, they despatched envoys to Sardis, for they knew that they had provoked the Lacedaemonians and Cleomenes to war.

      Hdt. 5.73 The Athenians come to Sardis to speak to the Persians about becoming allies, -507 BCE. The reader sees the Achaemenids and their past members (current revoltees) being replaced as the active agents in the narrative. Herodotus now has the Athenians and Spartans (Hellenes) speaking for their own interests rather than being dominated by outside forces (Achaemenid or otherwise).

    7. It was in the reign of Cleomenes that Aristagoras the tyrant of Miletus came to Sparta.

      Hdt. 5.49 Aristagaros comes to Sparta to speak with Kleomenes to convince the Spartans to join in his revolt against Darius and the Achaemenids. He brings his famous world map as a prop and visual aid.

    8. With all these fears in his mind, he began to plan revolt, for it chanced that at that very time there came from Susa Histiaeus' messenger

      Hdt. 5.35 Histiaios sends a messenger to Aristagoras telling him to revolt against Darius (which nicely coincides with Aristagoras' desire to revolt against the Achaemenids since he can't pay back his loan form Artaphrenes and Darius).

    9. Aristagoras came to Sardis and told Artaphrenes that Naxos was indeed an island of no great size, but that it was otherwise a beautiful and noble island lying near Ionia. Furthermore it had a store of wealth and slaves. “Therefore send an army against that country,” he said, “and bring back the men who have been banished from there.

      Hdt. 5.31 After promising to help the Naxians re-gain control of their island, Aristagoras instead tells Artaphrenes (the governor of Sardis) to help him attack it and seize it's wealth. Artaphrenes agrees to attack Naxos provided that Darius approve the plan.

    10. When the Naxians came to Miletus, they asked Aristagoras if he could give them enough power to return to their own country.

      Hdt. 5.30 The Naxians approach Aristagoras (ruler of Miletus in leu of Histiaios) about securing their island [Naxos]. Aristagoras agrees to help them (but he's secretly scheming against the Naxian's interests).

    11. let nothing prevent you from coming to me so that I may inform you of certain great purposes which I have in mind.

      Hdt. 5.24 Influenced by the advice of Megabazos, Darius recalls Histiaios to Sardis under the suspicion that Histiaios is plotting a rebelling - fortifying his principate as the seat of his tyranny. Instead of punishing Histiaios outright or letting him continue ruling in Myrcinus Darius makes him part of his personal council. Adhering to the old maxim: keep your friends close and your possibly-duplicitous-generals even closer.

    12. Then Megabazus, having made the Paeonians captive, sent as messengers into Macedonia the seven Persians who (after himself) were the most honorable in his army. These were sent to Amyntas to demand earth and water for Darius the king.

      Hdt. 5.17 Megabazos, a proxy for Darius and the Achaemenid Empire, sends messengers to the Macedonians demanding their supplication. The messengers converse with Amyntas of Macedon.

  5. Feb 2014
    1. Arion asked that, since they had made up their minds, they would let him stand on the half-deck in all his regalia and sing; and he promised that after he had sung he would do himself in

      1.24. Arion asks to be allowed to sing before throwing himself into the sea.

    2. Discovering this, he earnestly entreated them

      1.24. Arion the lyre-player begs the Corinthian sailors plotting to kill him to take his money but spare his life.

    3. the Lydians and Milesians ended the war and agreed to be friends and allies

      1.22. The Lydians and Milesians end the war and enter into an alliance. One might treat this agreement as the result of personal negotiations between the tyrant of Miletus and the Lydian king.

    4. offering to make a truce with Thrasybulus and the Milesians

      1.21. Alyattes offers to make a truce with the Milesians while he rebuilds the temple that was burned.

    5. But when the messengers came to Delphi, the Pythian priestess would not answer them before they restored the temple of Athena at Assesos in the Milesian territory,

      1.19. The Pythia refuses to answer the question about the illness until the Lydians rebuild the temple of Athena at Assesos.

    6. Speaking thus, Gyges resisted: for he was afraid that some evil would come of it for him. But this was Candaules' answer: “Courage, Gyges! Do not be afraid of me, that I say this to test you, or of my wife, that you will have any harm from her.

      1.9. Candaules rejects Gyges' advice and overrules his hesitation; the situation moves from a consultation to an order from a superior to an inferior.

    7. When Tomyris heard what had happened to her army and her son, she sent a herald to Cyrus with this message:

      1.212 Queen Tomyris asks Cyrus to return her son and leave the country.

    8. he told Tomyris to draw her army off, for he would cross (he said) and attack her;

      1.208 Cyrus sends a message to Queen Tomyris after deciding to attack her within her own city. Bold move bro.

    9. Tomyris sent a herald to him with this message: “O king of the Medes, stop hurrying on what you are hurrying on, for you cannot know whether the completion of this work will be for your advantage.

      1.206 Queen Tomyris responds to Cyrus' marriage proposal. It's a no. She thinks her troops can defeat Cyrus' in battle and save her city without loosing power over her holding to a political alliance.

    10. Cyrus sent a message with a pretence of wanting her for his wife,

      1.205 Cyrus sends a marriage proposal to Queen Tomyris of the Massegetai in order to capture her holdings through political alliance rather than through battle. Tomyris is not feeling it though.

    11. But the Phocaeans, very indignant at the thought of slavery, said they wanted to deliberate for a day, and then they would answer;

      1.162 In response to Harpagos's terms of surrender, the Phocaeans send back terms of their own terms, requesting time to deliberate.

    12. Harpagus marched against the city and besieged it, but he made overtures, and said that it would suffice him if the Phocaeans would demolish one rampart of the wall and dedicate one house.

      1.164 Before the siege can really get underway, Harpagos preemptively allows the Phocaeans to surrender.

    13. Persuade the Persians to rebel, and lead their army against the Medes;

      1.124 Harpagos sends a secret message to Cyrus encouraging him to rebel against Astyages.

    14. As soon as Astyages heard, he sent a threatening message to Cyrus: “Nevertheless, Cyrus shall not rejoice”

      1.128 In his defeat, sour-grapes Astyages sends another message to Cyrus

    15. Cyrus told the messenger to take back word that Astyages would see him sooner than he liked.

      1.127 Cyrus gives a sassy response to Astyages that he will meet the Medes on the field of battle.

    16. But when Astyages heard that Cyrus was about this business, he sent a messenger to summon him;

      1.127 Astyages sends a messenger to Cyrus before the start of fighting.

    17. The Chians, then, surrendered Pactyes

      1.161 The Chians of the island Chios surrender Pactyes to Mazares thus ending this vignette of rebellion within the Achaemenid Dynasty.

    18. they carried Egyptian and Assyrian merchandise

      Hdt. 1.1 Egyptians and Phoenicians: negotiation. Direction?

    19. Then Mazares sent a message to Mytilene demanding the surrender of Pactyes, and the Mytilenaeans prepared to give him, for a price;

      1.160 Pactyes is finally traded back to his Achaemenid pursuers.

    20. he sent messengers to Cyme demanding that Pactyes be surrendered.

      Mazares sends a message to the Cymeans to negotiate the return of Pactyes the rabble-rouser.

    21. These, after coming to Phocaea, sent Lacrines, who was the most esteemed among them, to Sardis, to repeat there to Cyrus a proclamation of the Lacedaemonians,

      1.152 The Lacedaemonians send a herald to Cyrus to give an order/ultimatum that no Greek cities be harmed or destroyed in conquest. Cyrus responds to this missive with confusion (and some derision) as he has no idea who the Spartans are.

    22. the Ionians and Aeolians sent messengers to Cyrus, offering to be his subjects on the same terms as those which they had under Croesus.

      1.141 The Ionians and Aeolians attempt to make a defensive alliance with Cyrus and his Persians (in order to avoid destruction and plundering). They seek the same favorable terms they had under Croesus. Cyrus sees this as presumptuous, when neither of these nations came to his aid and now expected favors from him.