32 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2021
    1. Affinity groups, as they’re often called within the study of social movements, have been a common feature of grassroots political organising in recent years. “We have seen this developing over time, in many contemporary movements – where people are valued for their expertise and what they can bring within the larger movement,” says Bart Cammaerts, a professor of politics and communication at the London School of Economics.
    2. For XR itself, the model seems to have worked, if anything from a numerical standpoint. As academics Douglas McAdams and Ronnelle Paulsenfound in 1993, knowing someone who is involved in social movements is one of the strongest predictors of recruitment into that same movement.
    1. Hindu-Muslim unity,
      • Both Hindus and Muslims despised the British enough to work together
    2. he Rebellion of 1857—-was the “greased cartridge” controversy.
      • In 1857, a rumor was spread that the British were using cow and pig fat in the cartitriges Indian soldiers had to bite off which caused a rebellion of soliers who believed this meant the British were trying to convert them to Christianity.
      • This event demonstrates that there was massive distrust in the British as well
      • People would not start a huge rebellion based on a small rumor if they were not already angry with the status quo and were waiting for the last straw.
    3. the )»- portant role of the lower classes.
      • Peasants made a big part of the 1857 Rebellion because of their frustrations in not only the cultural rule of the British but the taxation rule and the loans they had to take out to pay taxes
    4. e petnte a government of his ow modeling it on the British administration.
      • The peasant Devi Singh made his own gov based on the British way of governing with a peasant army that went after the moneyloaners hated by peasants in debt
      • This may be evidence for the idea that the main sticking point for Indian peasants was the cultural and taxation policies of the British instead of the administrative part
    5. determined to destroy the religion
      • There was already massive distrust in the cultural/religious policies of the British before the cartridge controversy
      • It is notable that the main sticking point for the rebels was British religious enforcement, showing how displeased Indians were with British policies in the early 1800s to try to make Indians culturally British
    6. hus, they destroyed anything that represent: the authority of the company:

      Very similar to the French Revolution, immense oppression boils to extreme revolution against everything

    7. it was the duty of the wealthy
      • Pattern: underprivileged groups convincing people in power (wealthy Indians) to support a cause for a reason (loss of religious practices) that is only one of the many reasons the underprivileged people support the cause (heavy taxation, loss of rights, etc.).
  2. Mar 2021
  3. Jan 2021
  4. Nov 2020
    1. Net zero by 2025 is not physically impossible. There is no real barrier to deploying the technology required or to achieving the necessary changes in behaviour. But to achieve this, it is not a question of physical possibility but rather whether you believe it is possible to change the economic structure and political decision making of the UK (and EU and world) overnight to allow us to deploy all possible solutions over the next five years.
    1. Netto-Null-Ziel müsste also hier schon Ende 2028 oder sogar Ende 2025 erreicht werden. Das entspricht der Forderung der noch recht jungen Umweltbewegung Extinction Rebellion, die im Frühjahr durch spektakuläre Straßenblockaden in London weltweit bekannt geworden ist. „Wenn man 1,5 Grad mit einer Zwei-Drittel-Wahrscheinlichkeit erreichen will und die Feedbackmechanismen des Erdsystems und die größere Verantwortung von Industrieländern berücksichtigt, dann ist das die logische Konsequenz“, sagt Klimaforscher Rogelj.
    1. Our work clearly demonstrates that we already have the tools and technology needed to efficiently power the UK with 100% renewable energy, to feed ourselves sustainably and so to play our part in leaving a safe and habitable climate for our children and future generations.
  5. Oct 2020
  6. Sep 2020
  7. Aug 2020
  8. Apr 2020
    1. S’asseoir sur une table est une première forme de détournement, non ? Ce n’est pas par hasard que c’était considéré comme un acte de rébellion il y a quelques décennies…

      en tant que témoin étudiant de ce genre de scène jouée par Marcello, je crois que cet acte s'est plutôt naturalisé – même si ce ne sont pas tous les profs qui s'assoient sur les tables, loin de là…

  9. Jan 2019
    1. if to do thatis human, if that's what it tak§, tnen I am a human being after all. 'Fully, freely, gladly, for tneficst time.

      I have to bring up James Cone and Albert Camus again -- but this time I'm reminded of Camus' The Rebel) and this paragraph from Cone's Black Power and Black Theology: "The crucial question, then, for the black man, is 'How should I respond to a world which defines me as a nonperson?' That he is a person is beyond question, not debatable. But when he attempts to relate as a person, the world demands that he respond as a thing. In this existential absurdity, what should he do? Should he respond as he knows himself to be, or as the world defines him?" Rebellion is what Cone, Camus, and Le Guin decide to do when they redefine what it means to be a person, to be human.

  10. Apr 2017
    1. a rebellion a rebellion

      But rebellions themselves are dependent on viewpoint, as well. What might be called a "rebellion" by the rebels if they succeed might also be called a riot by the dominant forces should the rebellion fail.

      Rebellion definition: an act of violent or open resistance to an established government or ruler.

      Riot definition: a violent disturbance of the peace by a crowd.

  11. Sep 2016
    1. But if I don’t watch out for myself, who will?”

      The Guard didn't carry out Creon's orders because of loyalty to his ruler, but rather because his life was at stake. Creon is so concerned with stabilizing his power and making sure he is never crossed, demonstrated in how angered he was that Antigone, a woman, had disobeyed his decree. But, his own direct underlings show how they are not in blind loyalty to him but rather feel guilt and remorse for the actions they are forced to do and have motives of their own. Thus, the people of Thebes have shown that Creon's power is nothing more than a facade and that they all act in their own self interest. Ismene, Antigone, the Guard, and Haemon all demonstrated this imbalance in power by directly disobeying or disagreeing with Creon.

  12. Oct 2015
    1. V. Seven Years’ War

      Week 9 Video Lecture

      Study Questions for this week's reading in American Yawp:

      What tensions between France and England and the colonies did the Seven Years’s War reveal?

      What impact did England’s victory in the Seven Years'

      War have upon Native Americans? How was their relationship different with the French than it was with the English?

      How does England attempt to increasingly regulate and tax the colonies after the war?

    1. Signs of rebellion are everywhere: the unrest in China and India is chronic, civil wars rage in Africa, Latin America is in ferment.

      People aren't just unhappy for no reason.. are we taking into account everyone's response to these movements? I know not all societies are governed by a democracy, but it's still important to take into account how citizens will react to changes implemented by the government

  13. Sep 2015
  14. Feb 2014
    1. he sent messengers to Cyme demanding that Pactyes be surrendered.

      Mazares sends a message to the Cymeans to negotiate the return of Pactyes the rabble-rouser.

    2. But Pactyes, learning that an army sent against him was approaching, was frightened and fled to Cyme.

      1.157 Pactyes escapes to Cyme in order to avoid the wrath of Cyrus and the approaching Persian army. This vignette of conflict within the Achaemenids/Persians is still a long way from its conclusion.

    3. So Cyrus uttered his thought; but Croesus feared that he would destroy Sardis, and answered him thus:

      1.155 Cyrus consults Croesus on what he should do about the rebellion of Pactyes. Croesus gives a respectable and helpful answer but is still seen as looking after the well-being of his former dominion: Sardis. He doesn't want to see the city sacked.