82 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2020
  2. journals.sagepub.com journals.sagepub.com
    1. Sorokowska, A., Sorokowski, P., Hilpert, P., Cantarero, K., Frackowiak, T., Ahmadi, K., Alghraibeh, A. M., Aryeetey, R., Bertoni, A., Bettache, K., Blumen, S., Błażejewska, M., Bortolini, T., Butovskaya, M., Castro, F. N., Cetinkaya, H., Cunha, D., David, D., David, O. A., … Pierce, J. D. (2017). Preferred Interpersonal Distances: A Global Comparison. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 48(4), 577–592. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022022117698039

  3. Jun 2020
    1. The furries are kind of like the new age Native American where they have the spirit animal or connection, or like, they take on that personal animal. . . . And whatever you put on, [you] take on those characters [and] aspects, and, for some people with social stigma who can’t interact, they put on the suit and they’re a completely different person.

      Make note of Sarah Marie Henry's Furries, Fans, and Feminism: Querying and Queering of the Furry Fandom. Sarah Marie Henry made a very good point about the appropriation of Native American culture in the furry fandom, something that is not exactly the nicest thing to do. Traditions stay within certain groups for a reason. A direct quotation/reference may be impossible, as the only copy of this master's thesis is locked up in San Francisco State University, and there's a pandemic. 😕

  4. journals.sagepub.com journals.sagepub.com
    1. Sorokowska, A., Sorokowski, P., Hilpert, P., Cantarero, K., Frackowiak, T., Ahmadi, K., Alghraibeh, A. M., Aryeetey, R., Bertoni, A., Bettache, K., Blumen, S., Błażejewska, M., Bortolini, T., Butovskaya, M., Castro, F. N., Cetinkaya, H., Cunha, D., David, D., David, O. A., … Pierce, J. D. (2017). Preferred Interpersonal Distances: A Global Comparison. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 48(4), 577–592. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022022117698039

  5. May 2020
  6. Apr 2020
  7. Dec 2019
  8. whokilledzebedee.wordpress.com whokilledzebedee.wordpress.com
    1. I could hang you by a word.

      While capital punishment in Britain did not cease until the 20th century, the last woman hanged was Frances Kidder in 1868. The same year saw the last public hanging in Britain.

      Published in 1880, this story likely takes place decades prior, given the indication of the narrative format, making it possible that Priscilla could have indeed been subject to hanging.

    2. copies to every police station

      British police began employing photography in their investigations and organization in the mid-nineteenth century. Photography itself was invented in the 1820s, though wasn’t available to the public until several decades later.

    3. sheep-farming in Australia

      Britain began its colonial conquest of Australia in 1788. Its early history functioned as a pseudo penal colony, but by the mid-late nineteenth century, its colonial expansion during the gold rush in the 1850s influenced its development into a settler colony.

    4. I did it in my sleep!

      Anxieties and interest in mesmerism (also known as animal magnetism) and hypnotism compounded in the nineteenth century, featuring in sensational novels and occult media. Here, as in many cultural instances, a woman is (or believes she is) subject to its influence. While Mrs. Zebedee has a history of sleepwalking, her book “The World of Sleep” suggests an ambiguous influence suspiciously similar to mesmerism. For further discussion of Collins and gender and mesmerism, see Pearl in the further reading tab.

    5. Martinique

      Martinique, an island in the West Indies, was colonized in the 17th century and remains a French region today.

    6. cigar agent

      The tobacco industry in the nineteenth century was a major part of international trade and imperial capitalism. Cigars, at this point in history, were more widely smoked than cigarettes.

    7. London police force

      The London Police formed in 1839 in the City of London.

    1. Now that it's summer, Graves has made good on his word, putting it on the menu at Red Door, 2118 N. Damen Ave. in Bucktown. It's $5, a buck more than what Graves said he paid on that memorable winter day. He also plans to sell Dorielotes at his booth at the Roscoe Village Burger Fest in July.

      you gonna give any of those proceeds to the dude you bought it from or nah?

  9. Oct 2019
  10. Sep 2019
    1. It is so interesting how "kin" varies so widely throughout the world. In some societies with multiple wives to one man, the children of them will just consider all of them mothers and not worry about blood. While here in the United States, we have whole TV dramas about finding your blood related mother or father. In the U.S., we have definitely glamorized being a blood related parent more than someone who takes care of kids they have taken duty of. Even now, when speaking of adopting a child, there will still be people that say "When are you going to have real kids" or ask women why they won't have kids if they don't want them.

  11. Feb 2019
    1. it was necessary to socif:Wc.i,ss ety, and to the state of human nature in general,1MM--4fct.., that the language of the animal passions of man(J•� at least, should be fixed, self-evident, and univer­cl,,yli'.A.� sally intelligible; and it has accordingly been im-� pressed, by the unerring hand of nature, on the human frame.

      Sheridan claims that such "animal passions" are a universal thing (says emotions are "the same in all nations" in the next column), but this strikes me more as a cultural technique. (What also of those who don't experience emotions in the same way? Sociopaths or otherwise?)

    1. no material difference

      Or nothing but material difference (paper) between them ;)

      Like kmurphy1, I was thinking Ong would likely disagree on this matter, but Astell does make room for their differences as "talents which do not always meet." For all the functional differences (oral vs pen and paper, intangible vs tangible), does Astell see them both as means of communication and therefore only different in those functions?

    1. different countries and re-mote ages, wherein the speakers and writers had very different notions, tempers, customs, orna-ments, and figures of speech, &c., every one of which influenced the signification of their words

      Brings to mind Rickert's rhetorics and Siegert's cultural techniques

  12. Jan 2019
    1. Although we believe that this study establishes the presence of g in data from these non-Western cultures, this study says nothing about the relative level of general cognitive ability in various societies, nor can it be used to make cross-cultural comparisons. For this purpose, one must establish measurement invariance of a test across different cultural groups (e.g., Holding et al., 2018) to ensure that test items and tasks function in a similar way for each group.

      This is absolutely essential to understanding the implications of the article.

    2. The mean sample size of the remaining data sets was 539.6 (SD = 1,574.5). The large standard deviation in relationship to the mean is indicative of the noticeably positively skewed distribution of sample sizes, a finding supported by the much smaller median of 170 and skewness value of 6.297. There were 16,559 females (33.1%), 25,431 males (48.6%), and 10,350 individuals whose gender was unreported (19.8%). The majority of samples—62 of 97 samples (63.9%)—consisted entirely or predominantly of individuals below 18. Most of the remaining samples contained entirely or predominantly adults (32 data sets, 33.0%), and the remaining 3 datasets (3.1%) had an unknown age range or an unknown mix of adults and children). The samples span nearly the entire range of life span development, from age 2 to elderly individuals.

      My colleague, Roberto Colom, stated in his blog (link below) that he would have discarded samples with fewer than 100 individuals. This is a legitimate analysis decision. See his other commentary (in Spanish) at https://robertocolom.wordpress.com/2018/06/01/la-universalidad-del-factor-general-de-inteligencia-g/

    3. Alternatively, one could postulate that a general cognitive ability is a Western trait but not a universal trait among humans, but this would require an evolutionary model where this general ability evolved several times independently throughout the mammalian clade, including separately in the ancestors of Europeans after they migrated out of Africa and separated from other human groups. Such a model requires (a) a great deal of convergent evolution to occur across species occupying widely divergent environmental niches and (b) an incredibly rapid development of a general cognitive ability while the ancestors of Europeans were under extremely strong selection pressures that other humans did not experience (but other mammal species or their ancestors would have experienced at other times). We find the more parsimonious model of an evolutionary origin of the general cognitive ability in the early stages of mammalian development to be the more plausible one, and thus we believe that it is reasonable to expect a general cognitive ability to be a universal human trait.

      It was this reasoning that led to the decision to conduct this study. There is mounting evidence that g exists in other mammalian species, and it definitely exists in Western cultures. It seemed really unlikely that it would not exist in non-Western groups. But I couldn't find any data about the issue. So, time to do a study!

    4. Panga Munthu test of intelligence

      To me, this is the way to create tests of intelligence for non-Western cultures: find skills and manifestations of intelligence that are culturally appropriate for a group of examinees and use those skills to tap g. Cross-cultural testing would require identifying skills that are valued or developed in both cultures.

    5. Berry (1986)

      John W. Berry is a cross-cultural psychologist whose work stretches back over 50 years. He takes the position (e.g., Berry, 1986) that definitions of intelligence are culturally-specific and are bound up with the skills cultures encourage and that the environment requires people to develop. Therefore, he does not see Western definitions as applying to most groups.

      After this study, my position is more nuanced approach. I agree with Berry that the manifestations of intelligence can vary from culture to culture, but that underneath these surface features is g in all humans.

  13. Nov 2018
    1. As with other forms of value-based health care, patient-centered care requires a shift in the way provider practices and health systems are designed, managed, and reimbursed. In keeping with the tenets of patient-centeredness, this shift neither happens in a vacuum, it driven by traditional hierarchies in which providers or clinicians are the lone authority. Everyone, from the parking valet and environmental services staff to c-suite members, are engaged in the process, which impacts hiring, training, leadership style, and organizational culture. Patient-centered care also represents a shift in the traditional roles of patients and their families from one of passive “order taker” to one of active “team member.” One of the country’s leading proponents of patient-centered care, Dr. James Rickert, has stated that one of the basic tenets of patient-centered care is that “patients know best how well their health providers are meeting their needs.” To that end, many providers are implementing patient satisfaction surveys, patient and family advisory councils, and focus groups, and using the resulting information to continuously improve the way health care facilities and provider practices are designed, managed, and maintained from both a physical and operational perspective so they become centered more on the individual person than on a checklist of services provided. As the popularity of patient- and family-centered health care increases, it is expected that patients will become more engaged and satisfied with the delivery of their care, and evidence of its clinical efficacy should continue to mount.

      Cultural shift to patient-centered care

  14. Sep 2018
    1. once the argument congealed around the question of a white woman being appointed to tell the story of African people, it ceased to be about curatorial diversity, and turned into a battle for African heritage, about ancestral claims.

      reflects cultural appropriation and telling stories that belong to others from white/european/male art historical perspective

    1. Yesterdays anti-colonialists are trying to humanize today’s generalized colonialism.

      How?

    2. are no longer valid

      I'd like to learn why he feels this way in greater depth than by how this author translates it.

  15. Jul 2018
    1. A cultural rhetorics orientation requires an investment in a methodological frame that values the relation among history, practice, and knowledge.

      "history, practice, and knowledge."

  16. Jun 2018
    1. This is due to a natural human reaction to “Google” someone before we meet them for the first time. Before we show up to teach a class, take a class, interview for a job, go on a date…we’ve been reviewed online. Other people use the trail of breadcrumbs that we’ve left behind to make judgements about us. The question/challenge is that this trail of breadcrumbs is usually incomplete, and locked up in various silos. You may have bits of your identity in Facebook or Twitter, while you have other parts locked up in Instagram, Snapchat, or LinkedIn. What do these incomplete pieces say about you? Furthermore, are they getting the entire picture of you when they uncover certain details? Can they look back to see what else you’re interested in? Can they see how you think all of these interests fit together…or they seeing the tail end of a feverish bout of sharing cat pics?

      I can't help but think that doing this is a form of cultural anthropology being practiced contemporaneously.

      Which is more likely: someone a 100 years from now delving into my life via my personal website that aggregated everything or scholars attempting to piece it all back together from hundreds of other sites? Even with advanced AI techniques, I think the former is far more likely.

      Of course I also think about what @Undine is posting about cats on Twitter or perhaps following #marginaliamonday and cats, and they're at least taking things to a whole new level of scholarship.


      [also on boffosocko.com]

  17. May 2018
    1. Here, the role as a dutiful spouse or parent or sibling obligates the proxy to execute decisions for the patient that the proxy would never stomach for himself or herself.

      Another story of a spouse making medical decisions for their partner shows that their values can override any medical professional's suggestion to withdraw life support and end the patient's suffering. This passage also suggests there could be a difference in how other cultures approach death, dying, and medical care.

  18. Mar 2018
    1. young activists can feed a constant conflict over racist Native-American sports mascots, even as actual Native Americans, when surveyed, consistently say that they do not care about the mascots, and instead are far more concerned about poverty, addiction, and violence in their communities.

      Accusations of "cultural appropriation" serving to distract from more difficult challenges.

  19. Sep 2017
    1. My focus on Charlotte Lucas resonates with recent critical trends that depart from the assumption that the novel’s telos, particularly as revealed in the courtship plot, is the representation of personhood through characterological depth and interiority

      One of the main purposes of the article. Moe sets out to oppose, or at least challenge, previous readings of the novel (and is thus her placement within a scholarly discourse), to reconsider how actions of "characterological depth and interiority" are formed within the courtship plot, and how it is impacted by cultural modernity. She does this through a reading of Charlotte Lucas.

    2. Narratives have limited resources—formal development, narrative attention, and thematic social goods—that are unequally distributed between protagonists and minor characters. In the process of being “minored,” the many clarify the one; in Pride and Prejudice, minor characters “contribut[e] to the development of Elizabeth’s consciousness.”5 As Elizabeth’s close friend and, in many ways, catalyst for her development, Charlotte is both a minor character par excel-lence and a register of the costs of such a system of individuation

      It is important to relate the concept of cultural modernity and Charlotte's choices to narrative, as that is the main point of the argument (though Moe's thesis is not clearly stated just yet). Also fascinating to label all the minor characters are developmental aspects to Elizabeth; this is quite dehumanizing, but is quite arguable. Austen, therefore, purposefully has Charlotte marry Collins as part of further promoting Elizabeth's vehement feelings about marriage.

    3. narrative of cultural modernizatio

      "Cultural modernization" is terminology to consider throughout this entire piece. What does it mean to be "culturally modern"? Do the characters of this text (Charlotte, specifically) perform actions that are "culturally modern"? Moe states that Austen critics have labeled Charlotte/Elizabeth's conflicting ideas on marriage a result of "cultural modernization," but what does this really mean? Who is defining this? This concept, however, is part of the core of this article's purpose.

    1. A real-time crime tracking application is a prime example of cultural reproduction — how technological artifacts can be encoded in ways that reflect racist fears.

      We might broadly see the fantasy of real-time surveillance of crime in neighborhoods as emergingfrom “smart cities” rhetoric, practices with mobile media, and the perceived availability of data. [...] It would perpetuate systemic inequality that is already exacerbated through the media and the housing market.

  20. Jul 2017
    1. “We welcome all varying views, and in fact you will likely find our views run very counter to many of the [racist] views we are being claimed to have,” they continued. “We encourage people to join us for breakfast and open up a productive dialogue about any issue.”

      Of course. This is the problem with white (I'm assuming) liberals.

  21. Jun 2017
    1. This is a draft - so Please make annotate and make suggestion or express concerns as you see fit.

      Please be courteous and respectful.

  22. Mar 2017
  23. Feb 2017
    1. line between written and spoken rhetoric was indistinct

      Thinking back to Sheridan, who would probably disagree: "But tho' all who are blest with the gift of speech, by constantly associating the ideas of articulate sounds, to those characters which they see on paper, come to imagine that there is a necessary connection between them, and that the one, is merely a symbol of the other; yet, that it is in itself, a manner of communication entirely different, and utterly independent of the other..."

      Further down in the paragraph it is suggested that this blurred line between written and spoken rhetoric could possibly be attributed to Douglass' blending of African, European, and American cultural elements, beyond just necessary last-minute additions of antislavery tracts. Could it then be because of Sheridan's homogenous rhetorical background that he believed written and spoken word to be distinct?

  24. Jan 2017
    1. The so-called ‘cultural’ turn in literary studies since the 1970s, with its debt to postmodern understandings of the relationship between power and narrative, has pushed the field away from such systematic, semi-mechanistic ways of analysing texts. AI remains concerned with formal patterns, but can nonetheless illuminate key aspects of narrative, including time, space, characters and plot.
  25. Dec 2016
    1. Should open source projects look like companies? Of course not. For one thing, a company is a business, and an open source project is a community, with very different goals and needs.
    2. When we think of open source’s influence on software, we tend to think about the legal implications. Open source made it acceptable to share, use and modify software freely.But open source changed how software companies build proprietary products, too. That open source principles are being used to develop closed source software speaks volumes about its cultural legacy.
  26. Nov 2016
  27. Sep 2016
    1. At a time when many multiracial Americans are proudly asserting their mixed-race identity, many Latinos, an overwhelmingly blended population with Indian, European, African and other roots, are sidestepping or ignoring questions of race.

      Since people keep assuming and getting things wrong, some latinos try to ignore the question of race in order to stop the disagreements.

    2. When respondents do not choose a race, the Census Bureau assigns them one, based on factors like the racial makeup of their neighborhood, inevitably leading to a less accurate count.

      This is incredibly stupid. I think this would lead to many riots and fights because people are being judged and Census is using cultural bias to put people in a box. Not only is this not accurate this is also racist.

    1. Although cultural knowledge is hidden from view, it is of fundamental impor-tance because we all use it constantly to generate behavior and interpret our expe-rience

      Cultural knowledge is a very broad topic hidden from the view, but is also very important because we use it constantly to generate behavior and interpret our experience

    2. Our culture has a large body of shared knowledge that people learn and use to engage in this behavior called reading and make proper use of the artifacts connected with it

      Cultural knowledge – what people know (ex. Grammatical rules for a language, meaning of space, lines and columns, how to feel when reading jokes, etc.)

    3. This common activity depended on a great many cultural artifacts, the things people shape or make from natural resources

      Cultural artifacts - the things people shape or make from natural resources (ex. The bark of trees are made into paper, glue used to hold pages together, etc.)

    4. All of us were engaged in the same kind of cultural behavior: reading

      Cultural behavior – what people do (ex. Everyone on the train was engaged in reading)

    5. When ethnographers study other cultures, they must deal with three fundamental aspects of human experience: what people do, what people know, and the things peo-ple make and use

      Ethnographers deal with three fundamental aspects of the human experience : cultural behavior, cultural knowledge, and cultural artifacts

    6. cultural knowledge.

      cultural knowledge

    1. Finally, in order for data-driven interventions to be wide-spread, institutions must sustain a culture that embraces the use of data, and create incentives for data-driven activities amongst administrators, instructors and student support staff. Large-scale, data-driven policy changes are implemented with minimal friction and maximal buy-in when leaders demonstrate a commitment to data-informed decision-making, and create multiple opportunities for stakeholders to make sense of and contribute to the direction of the change. Users not only need to be trained on the proper ways to use these tools and communicate with students, they also require meaningful incentives to take on the potentially steep learning curve.[40]

      Thankfully, this paragraph isn’t framed as a need for (top-down) “culture change”, as is often the case in similar discussions. Supporting a culture is a radically different thing from forcing a change. To my mind, it’s way more likely to succeed (and, clearly, it’s much more empowering). But “decision-makers” may also interpret active support as weaker than the kind of implementation they know. It’s probably a case where a “Chief Culture Officer” can have a key role, in helping others expand their understanding of how culture works. Step 1 is acknowledging that culture change isn’t like a stepwise program.

  28. Aug 2016
    1. Page 10

      Borgman on the relationship of knowledge mobilization scholarship, similarities and differences:

      once collections of information resources are online, they become available to multiple communities. Researchers can partner across disciplines, asking new questions using each other's data. Data collected for policy purposes can be used for research and vice versa. Descriptions of museum objects created for curatorial research purposes are interesting to museum visitors. Any of these resources may also be useful for learning and instruction. nevertheless, making content that was created for one audience useful to another is a complex problem. Each field that is on vocabulary, data structures, and research practices. People ask questions in different ways, starting with familiar terminology. Repurpose sing of research data for teaching can be especially challenging. Scholars goals are to produce knowledge for their community, while student schools are to learn the concepts and tools of a given field. These two groups have different levels of expertise in both disciplinary knowledge in the use of data and information resources. Different descriptions, tools, and services may be required to share content between audiences.

  29. Jul 2016
    1. what is the English-speaking world missing out on by not reading the content written in other languages

      Though he’s been associated with a very strange idea he never had, Edward Sapir was quite explicit about this loss over a hundred years ago. Thinking specifically about a later passage warning people about the glossocide English language. But it’s been clear in his work from long before that excerpt that we’re missing out when we focus on a single language.

    1. The ultimate goal of the project is to support improved teaching and learning in university classrooms by bridging cultural divides between students and their teachers.

      Did not expect this line of thinking, from the headline.

  30. Jun 2016
    1. is wiseto avoid generalizations and to concentrate instead on show-ing how interactions between coworkers, specifically theorchestration of information exchange and coauthorship, aregrounded in local culture.

      "it is wise to avoid generalizations and to concentrate instead on showing how interactions between coworkers, specifically the orchestration of information exchange and coauthorship, are grounded in local culture."

    2. iomedical collaborations are moreheterogeneous and socially diffuse in character and do notappear to have the same degree of multilayered, internalreview as HEP research collaborations. T

      biomedicine is a less homogeneous group and so less internal trust

    3. TheHEP research community is thus characterized by highlevels of internal scrutiny, mutual trust—witness, for in-stance, the institutionalized practice of relying upon, andciting, preprints—and peer tracking, such that it is notsusceptible to systematic fraud. Contrary

      physicists live in a very trustful, observant, world; also they do a lot of internal, pre-referee, review

    4. The answer probably has to do with the relative intensityof socialization and oral communication (Traweek, 1992,pp. 120 –123), along with the character of the organizationalstructures and value systems, which define collaborations inlarge-scale, high-energy physics and biomedical research.

      Why is there less soul-searching about hyper-authorship in HEP? disciplinary differences

    1. The respondents also de- scribed a creative person as one who has a collectivistic orientation, such as one who "inspires people," "has contribution to the progress of society" and "is appreciated by others." These descriptions, found in this sample of Chinese people, did not occur in U.S. investigations (Rudowicz et al., 1995

      Chinese conceptions of creativity include collectivistic aspects of inspiration.

      Authors indicate these did not come up in U.S. studies, but these could be artefacts of design method.

  31. May 2016
    1. Engagement with decolonization and decolonial practices is central to the work of most cultural rhetorics scholars.

      Are there colonial methodologies? If so, how can we implement the methodological practices of a culture (i.e. Mormonism) and apply them to a cultural rhetorics study? Wouldn't that be furthering colonialism?

      Zooming further out: are there instances where one shouldn't adopt methodologies of a culture?

  32. Apr 2016
    1. From: Jennifer Scribner-Snyder To: Beth Fremont Sent: Wed, 08/18/1999 9:06 AM Subject: Where are you?

      This novel opens with an unusual form of point of view: an email exchange. Embedded in this first chapter are allusions to the era in which the novel is set. How does the email "POV" and the allusions help contextualize the story?

  33. Feb 2016
    1. If the panopticon effect is when you don’t know if you are being watched or not, and so you behave as if you are, then the inverse panopticon effect is when you know you are being watched but act as if you aren’t. This is today’s surveillance culture: exhibitionism in bad faith.

      This has an accelerative effect on cultural change at the margins of battlegrounds from which the State is retreating. Previously forbidden behavior can become quickly recognized as commonplace.

  34. Dec 2015
    1. a sophisticated creation thatseems to simultaneously extend but also threaten our understanding of what it means tobe human.

      So if it threatens our understanding of what it means to be human.. is that beneficial to our ongoing research of essentially what makes us humans by constantly pushing our understanding to be deeper? or is harmful and uprooting of the interpersonal/cultural norms we've established?

  35. Nov 2015
    1. If this were true for modern society, it has multiplied in ourage of social media, in which control and value are indissolubly linked to the machine ensemblesthat comprise contemporary digital infrastructures.

      I have studied in my International Marketing course here how social media is a cultural institution in society and has an extremely powerful influence on societal structures regarding preferences, levels of acceptance of products/technology, and how consumers are influenced to use them.

  36. Oct 2015
    1. These historic details resonated with the late President Nestor Kirchner, for whom the cultural center is now named, and for his widow, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, who succeeded him as president. They're from the Peronist party, and like Juan and Eva Peron, who founded that party, as well as such cultural institutions as the Argentine National Symphony, the arts are baked into their worldview, says Culture Minister Teresa Parodi.

      The installment of a free cultural center in Buenos Aires reflects the Peronist use of the arts to further national identity.

  37. Sep 2015
    1. historical political boundaries of the native Americans

      We view the world in these simplified 2D representations of clearcut political entities. Fredrik Barth and Benedict Anderson have said quite a few important things about these issues of maps and boundaries.

  38. Feb 2014
    1. The fourth of the theories is as yet the least influential but seems to be gaining strength. Its key ideas are that human nature causes people to flourish more under some conditions than under others, and that social and political institutions should be organized to facilitate that flourishing. What, more specifically, are the conditions or “functionings” that enable people to flourish?
      • Life
      • Health
      • Bodily integrity – protection against physical hazards and against physical and sexual assault
      • Autonomy – in the sense of the ability to choose freely one’s vocations and avocations
      • Competence – the ability to confront and solve problems
      • Engagement – active involvement in professional and leisure activity, as opposed to passive consumption of goods and services
      • Self-expression – the ability to speak one’s mind and express one’s creative impulses
      • Relationships – participation in freely chosen communities
      • Privacy – access to zones of intimacy in which relationships can be nurtured and identity developed