13 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2022
    1. Whig history (or Whig historiography), often appearing as whig history, is an approach to historiography that presents history as a journey from an oppressive and benighted past to a "glorious present".[1] The present described is generally one with modern forms of liberal democracy and constitutional monarchy: it was originally a satirical term for the patriotic grand narratives praising Britain's adoption of constitutional monarchy and the historical development of the Westminster system.[2] The term has also been applied widely in historical disciplines outside of British history (e.g. in the history of science) to describe "any subjection of history to what is essentially a teleological view of the historical process".[3] When the term is used in contexts other than British history, "whig history" (lowercase) is preferred.[3]

      Stemming from British history, but often applied in other areas including the history of science, whig history is a historiography that presents history as a path from an oppressive, backward, and wretched past to a glorious present. The term was coined by British Historian Herbert Butterfield in The Whig Interpretation of History (1931). It stems from the British Whig party that advocated for the power of Parliament as opposed to the Tories who favored the power of the King.


      It would seem to be an unfortunate twist of fate for indigenous science and knowledge that it was almost completely dismissed when the West began to dominate indigenous cultures during the Enlightenment which was still heavily imbued with the influence of scholasticism. Had religion not played such a heavy role in science, we may have had more respect and patience to see and understand the value of indigenous ways of knowing.

      Link this to notes from The Dawn of Everything.

  2. Dec 2021
  3. Jun 2021
    1. Table 1Summary of Literature Search Results Including Journals Specializing in Corporate Social Responsibility and Related Topics, n (%) Journal EmpiricalConceptualTotalAcademy of Management Journal32 (86)5 (14)37 (6)Academy of Management Review2 (4)45 (96)47 (8)Administrative Science Quarterly3 (75)1 (25)4 (1)Business & Society12 (44)15 (56)27 (5)Business Ethics Quarterly11 (100)11 (2)International Journal of Management Reviews9 (100)9 (2)Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science8 (57)6 (43)14 (2)Journal of Applied Psychology0 (0)Journal of Business Ethics154 (45)188 (55)342 (58)Journal of International Business Studies6 (86)1 (14)7 (1)Journal of Management6 (55)5 (45)11 (2)Journal of Management Studies11 (65)6 (35)17 (3)Journal of Marketing5 (100)5 (1)Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology2 (100)2 (0)Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes0 (0)Journal of Organizational Behavior1 (100)1 (0)Organization Science1 (50)1 (50)2 (0)Organization Studies6 (75)2 (25)8 (1)Personnel Psychology1 (100)1 (0)Strategic Management Journal15 (94)1 (6)16 (3)Other journals7 (47)8 (53)27 (5)Total271 (47)305 (53)58

      Table 1 - Literature Review looks at empirical, conceptual, and total number of articles

  4. Jul 2019
    1. Morton Horwitz, The Transformation of American Law, 1780-1860

      Horwitz was one of Steinberg's dissertation advisors. His ideas about American law heavily influenced Steinberg's thesis in Nature, Incorporated.

    1. I lorwitz, Transfonnation of American law,

      Historiographic note: Morton Horwitz was one of Steinberg's dissertation advisors. He wrote the most important book about the history of American Law, and his perspective influenced Steinberg heavily. I highly recommend Horwitz's book -- it may be the single most significant book I've read in US History.

  5. May 2019
    1. t past efforts to speak for nature have masked social and cultur

      "I speak for the trees" says the Lorax.

    2. plain. The presence of coal seams or fertile soils in particular places has certainly mattered to human history, but to talk of coal or soils as

      Yeah, "agency" seems to imply choice. But it would be completely accurate to say that these natural features influenced (to some extent determined) the choices available to people.

    3. d other categories

      What does the historian mean by the term "category of analysis"?

    1. boilerplate thing

      Sounds like those 19th-century Chapman books filled with platitudes about the upstanding men of the regions. https://openlibrary.org/publishers/Chapman_brothers

    2. settler later wrote that the natives said

      There's got to be some evidence of what the Indians said to each other that's not filtered through this "settler" lens -- maybe have students read this alongside Colin Calloway's Scratch of the Pen.

    3. 19th-century ideology of Manifest Destiny

      Or at least of an uncritical embrace of the turner thesis.

  6. Feb 2017
    1. scholars

      I'm reading a lot in another class about historiography and about African Americans such as Du Bois reclaiming African American history, pointing out the unique culture, accomplishments and struggles while also revealing how those in privileged positions have constructed myths about blackness which resulted in the silencing of their history and experiences. Stewart is doing something similar in reclaiming the history of women.