22 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2022
    1. the Internet can potentially becomea backbone to a ‘global commons,’ an immense free space of information, products and services towhich everyone can contribute to and from which everyone can profit [51, 52 ].

      !- for : Indyweb * A "good enough" world is contingent on a global virtual commons * Indyweb can play a major role

    2. e moment of transition of the Internet—from mediating information to mediating distributeddirect governance in the sense of self-organization.
      • With proper design, the internet can play a more proactive role
      • From passive to active, sensemaking to action
      • Cosmolocal production: https://clreader.net
      • Web 3 technology
      • Indyweb
    1. A special case is when the content is program code, and the environment becomes an intelligent IDE
      • Within Indyweb ecosystem,
      • would this be when a user uses Trailmarks to identify a potentially useful application
      • and a bounty can then be offered to app developers
      • to develop an Indyweb app
      • to process the new function?
    2. interactive documents that capture more richly what the user is trying to accomplish.
      • Once again, is Indyweb and Trailmarks doing this?
      • If so, can you provide some examples?
    3. The environment can operate on these intentions and assist the user to create semantically richer documents that can be processed and executed, similar to a spreadsheet.

      @Gyuri, * Is this what Indyweb and specifically Trailmarks is also attempting to do? * Is there an example you can provide for clarification?

    1. the question you were asking was what is mind or consciousness so here we're using the words synonymously um and from a buddhist perspective uh there are 01:11:50 six what we call primary minds and then there's a whole slew of secondary minds and some of the more common systems include 51 in the secondary minds now please understand that mind like 01:12:04 everything else that exists in the world doesn't exist permanently it exists there are a few exceptions okay but essentially everything that exists in the world um is not permanent therefore 01:12:18 it's changing moment to moment therefore everything exists as a continuum including mind so that means there'll be a moment of mind followed by a next moment of mind etc 01:12:31 and the next moment of mind is determined primarily but not solely by the previous moment of mind so from that we can extrapolate a continuum an infinite continuum and mind is an 01:12:43 infinite continuum from perspective of buddhism and that means that we've had that implies suggests rebirth and it suggests we've had ultimate we've had infinite rebirths there's been no beginning 01:12:56 and so this then comes up again with the notion of a beginning creator if you will a so-called you know god there are some some problems here to resolve this um 01:13:07 and so mind is a continuum it's infinite now each moment of mind is made up of a primary mind and a constellation of secondary minds these six primary or the five as you read from nagarjuna the five 01:13:22 sensory minds of seeing hearing smelling tasting touching tactile right these five plus what's sometimes called the mental consciousness and that has live different levels of subtlety on the 01:13:34 grossest level is thinking if we go a little bit deeper a little bit more so little subtler we have dream mind which seems like these senses are active but actually 01:13:46 when we're sleeping the senses are inactive so it's just something coming from our sixth or mental consciousness it seems like the senses are active in dream mind that dream mind is a little more subtle than a wake mind awake 01:13:59 thinking mind and then if we go more subtle we're talking now again about awake mind we we talk about intuition when we're in intuition we're not thinking right it's a non-conceptual 01:14:11 mind uh in that sense and deeper yet our minds we call non-conceptual and non-dual where there's no awareness of a subject or an object so subject object non-duality so 01:14:25 that's kind of the rough sort of you know lay of the land

      Barry provides a brief summary of what the word "mind" means from a Buddhist philosophy perspective and says that there are six primary minds and 51 secondary minds.

      The 6 primary minds are the 5 senses plus mental consciousness, which itself consists of the coarse thinking (conceptual) mind, the intuitive mind (these two could be roughly mapped to Daniel Kahnaman's fast and slow system respectively), as well as the dreaming mind.

      Barry also conveys an interpretation of reincarnation based on the concept that the mind is never the same from one moment to the next, but is rather an ever changing continuum. The current experience of mind is GENERALLY most strongly influenced by the previous moments but also influenced by temporally distant memories. This above interpretation of reincarnation makes sense, as the consciousness is born anew in every moment. It is also aligned to the nature of the Indyweb interpersonal computing ecosystem, in which access to one's own private data store, the so-called Indyhub, allows one to experience the flow of consciousness by seeing how one's digital experience, which is quite significant today, affects learning on a moment to moment basis. In other words, we can see, on a granular level, how one idea, feeling or experience influences another idea, experience or feeling.

  2. bafybeibbaxootewsjtggkv7vpuu5yluatzsk6l7x5yzmko6rivxzh6qna4.ipfs.dweb.link bafybeibbaxootewsjtggkv7vpuu5yluatzsk6l7x5yzmko6rivxzh6qna4.ipfs.dweb.link
    1. competitions or leaderboards, where players can compare their achievements with those ofother players, so that they are incited to do better than they did up to now• narratives, in which the challenges are situated within a concrete context or storyline, so thatindividual actions become part of an extended course of action within a meaningfulenvironment (Dickey, 2006; Heylighen, 2012a)• epic meaning, in which the impression is created that the player is working to achieve a goalthat is particularly important or awe-inspiring (McGonigal, 2011)• trophies or virtual goods, in which players receive virtual presents as a reward for theirachievement• gifting, in which players get the opportunity to give virtual presents to other players, thustightening links of friendship

      Ask @Gyuri what he thinks about this list of ideas for game motivation and how Indyweb might integrate them or add new ones.

    2. he only thing needed is a shared medium or workspace in which clear traces of the work areregistered (Heylighen, 2011a; Parunak, 2006). The aggregated trace functions as a collectivememory that keeps track of the different contributions and indicates where further work may beneeded. This function is typically performed by the community website, such as the Wikipedia site.A more advanced example of this functionality can be found in the issue queue used byDrupal developers (Kiemen, 2011; Zilouchian Moghaddam, Twidale, & Bongen, 2011). This is acommunity-maintained, ordered list of feature requests or problems that need to be addressed,together with the status of the work being done on each. The issue queue makes it easy forcontributors to see where their contribution would be most helpful, and to keep track of theadvances made by others. It can be seen as a more spontaneous, self-organizing version of the jobticketing systems that are commonly used in technical support centers, where each incomingproblem is assigned a “job ticket”, after which the ticket is assigned to one or more employees, andmonitored so as to make sure it is adequately dealt with (Heylighen & Vidal, 2008; Orrick, Bauer,& McDuffie, 2000).

      Indyweb can increase traceability across the entire network through built in provenance mechanism.

    1. i think there's a lot of latent potential in this coordination mechanisms layer um especially i think there's a bunch of really good ideas around um things like futarki and other struck 00:17:59 i'm not necessarily sure that that particular construction will work but i think we need to a lot of experiments with those kinds of governance structures to see if there could be ways of governing systems algorithmically 00:18:11 and and with a way of aggregating a lot of our perspectives and thoughts and values um in a much more systematic way than sort of like uh very brittle representative democracy that like doesn't really scale to to 00:18:23 millions of people um and i think you know in terms of a lot of the mechanisms and structures that that we want to build um there's a lot more theory that is needed there's a lot more implementations that 00:18:35 are needed there's a lot more rigorous study and assessment of of performance and so on that is needed so um really encourage you to kind of pick out any of these

      Indyweb could be a good option for coordination layer.

    2. i really think this last one the coordination systems how do you get large groups of people to organize much better 00:16:44 that holds some of the most promise

      Indyweb / SRG / Global Boundaries combination for the large scale transformation and coordination framework.

    1. i framed this this r d program that is it's conceptual at the 00:07:18 time it's not funded yet you know i'm hoping that we can secure funds but i frame it as a partnership between this global science community and local communities 00:07:29 so it's very so dialogue with the public and within the science community and among interested stakeholders is extremely important in this um i i i 00:07:42 you know to me science has a role in in such a r d program because science is really the you know the where we would turn to answer some really difficult questions like if you wanted to build a simulation 00:07:56 model of how environmental or environmental or economic uh outcomes might be given you know a b c and d well then you know that's a that's a technical those are technical questions 00:08:08 um if you're if you're asking how can we measure how can what kind of metrics are reasonable for environmental and social well-being 00:08:23 those are largely scientific questions you know the math can be complicated for example but the questions of you know how do what do we want what do people want 00:08:36 how how how do they want their light you know how do they want to live their lives in in society those are questions for you know for the public and for communities especially 00:08:49 um i i the the intention of the r d program is not to develop one size fits all solution you know to trial it in a local community and then spread it everywhere that's not at all 00:09:02 the idea the idea is that this is an ongoing learning process a true partnership between uh local communities and the science and the science community and there would be just a million sorts 00:09:15 of you know experiments that one might might might run uh to to improve the kinds of societal systems that we have 00:09:27 or that were you know that we're proposing uh develop a new system try it out see how it works gather data you know do another experiment uh all within the partnership of at with 00:09:39 local communities at the local community level i think maybe you know i since i know this stuff

      This project is a collaboration between the global scientific community and local communities to improve societal systems. It's not a one-size-fits-all process, but many different experiments.

      Dialogue is a critical component of this process.

      Tipping Point Festival and SRG strategy is well aligned with Science-driven societal transformation ethos: second order science combined with local communities as the building block of civilization AND cosmolocal networking (https://clreader.net) via Indyweb interpersonal computing.

    2. the two questions that we hopefully would uh try to answer with with this r d program is and and one of this i already 00:56:53 mentioned but out of all conceivable designs for societal systems so so so this isn't about capitalism versus socialism or something like that there's like i would think there's an unlimited 00:57:05 potential we're creative we're creative people there would be a million varieties of of societal systems and integrated societal systems that we might come up with 00:57:17 and some of those probably would work very well and some of them probably would work very poorly um so among those what what might be among the best and not the the single best that's not the purpose either it's not just to find one thing that works is 00:57:30 to find like a you know more of a a variety a process of things a mix mishmash of things that community the communities can choose to implement that you know 00:57:43 works well for them and that suits them and that works well for their neighbors and works well forever it works well for the whole really

      Two questions to answer:

      1. out of all the conceivable societal systems possible, which are suited to a community? This is not one size fits all.

      This requires careful consideration. There cannot be complete autonomy, as lack of standards will make things very challenging for any inter-community cooperation.

      Cosmolocal framework (https://clreader.net) as well as Indyweb Interpersonal computing could mediate discussion between different community nodes and emerge common ground

    3. maybe i should say having a having a checkoff list like you know there should be this level of education there should be this level of 00:52:40 [Music] health people should live this long and so we have our fitness and we're gonna uh we've decided in advance even before the system is running we've 00:52:53 now have a list of things we're gonna check off we're gonna score each one we're gonna come up with some kind of integrated fitness score from that and that's how we're going to move forward we're always going to refer to this fit this you know this fitness model and 00:53:07 the fitness vector and these and these kind of hard-coded values for what's good and what's bad so so in the world of artificial intelligence and in the world of active inference you know that 00:53:19 really doesn't go very far that doesn't work that doesn't work very well because what happens is we didn't you didn't think ahead you like you some something happens tomorrow and whoever came up with that list of 00:53:32 uh you know those values or that model didn't really include the fact that maybe spaceships from mars were gonna land and cause a new disruption and then we have to deal with that problem now too before we deal with 00:53:45 anything else so that wasn't in the you know that wasn't in the plan and now what do we do you know so there's right so so this is you know this is really where active inference plays into 00:53:58 that's one way that active inference plays into this is how do you evaluate and act in a world that is full of uncertainties right 00:54:10 the unknown unknown the unknown unknown is the temperature dynamics but you know it's going to be temperature and so how can you plan for what you know it will be in a distributional sense 00:54:23 right and make stabilization on that awesome right right so so yeah so you so you realize you know already you realize maybe that this is not a proposal to build a say like a model of uh of uh you know 00:54:37 like how society makes decisions you know that's that's not that's not it it is what is the process by which society cognates 00:54:50 and you know what kind of what kind of infrastructure and tools and and and you know mechanics can we use that would facilitate that but it's not to build a thing 00:55:01 it's to build it's to realize that we are in we are engaged moment to moment in a cognitive process society as individuals are and how can we 00:55:14 do that together as a society so that we're you know we we balance exploration with exploitation um you know so that we we learn about our environment we grow we learn 00:55:27 we explore we we make good decisions based on available evidence and based on knowledge based on cultural knowledge you know like all those things right so so this is a this is 00:55:39 the the the you know i think organisms are a process they're not a thing anyway right cognition is a process and societal decision making is a process 00:55:54 and really society is a process you know there's there's not too many things in this world there's mostly processes living processes intelligent processes so that's that's the that's the hope 00:56:05 that's where this is trying to go is to like with that in mind with that with that broad understanding or broad concept in mind how do we uh how do we 00:56:16 think about you know how we how we come together as society how we cooperate how we coordinate how we make decisions how we how we learn how we explore what do we what do we monitor what kind 00:56:29 of information do we seek you know what kind of experiments do we do all that kind of stuff great

      Third Proposition:

      The superorganism's efforts to learn, decide and adapt can be interpreted as being driven by its intrinsic pupose.

      This is aligned to the Indyweb philosophy of a system architecture that promotes conversation, knowledge at the edge and high efficacy collective learning.

      Living beings,and groups of living beings are processes and not (static) things - a perspective aligned with SRG and Indyweb. The process quality of being a living human INTERbeing quickly becomes apparent after one starts using the Interpersonal Indyweb computing ecosystem. In particular, the Indyhub allows the Indyvidual to consolidate all their digital and virtual interactions in one place, which allows for the first time, the ability to witness one's own individual learning on a granular level and literally see the process of your own individual learning in realtime.

  3. Jun 2022
    1. The experts were asked to independently provide a comprehensive list of levers and leverage points for global sustainability, based on the potential for disproportionate effects to address and reverse the deterioration of nature while meeting societal needs. They were asked to consider actions by the full range of possible actors, and both top-down and bottom-up effects across various sectors. The collection of all responses became our initial set of levers and leverage points. Ensuing processes were then informed by five linked conceptualizations of transformative change identified by the experts (Chan et al., 2019): ● Complexity theory and leverage points of transformation (Levin et al., 2013; Liu et al., 2007; Meadows, 2009); ● Resilience, adaptability and transformability in social–ecological systems (Berkes, Colding, & Folke, 2003; Folke et al., 2010); ● A multi-level perspective for transformative change (Geels, 2002); ● System innovations and their dynamics (Smits, Kuhlmann, & Teubal, 2010; OECD, 2015) and ● Learning sustainability through ‘real-world experiments’ (Geels, Berkhout, & van Vuuren, 2016; Gross & Krohn, 2005; Hajer, 2011).

      Set of levers and leverage points identified by the authors.

      Creating an open public network for radical collaboration, which we will call the Indyweb, can facilitate bottom-up engagement to both educate the public on these levers as well as be an application space to crowdsource the public to begin sharing local instantiations of these levers.

      An Indyweb that is in the form of an interpersonal space in which each individual is the center of their data universe, and in which they can see all the data from their diverse digital interactions across the web and in real life all consolidated in one place offers a profound possibility for both individual and collective learning. Such an Indyweb would bring the relational nature of the human being, the so called "human INTERbeing" alive, and would effortlessly emerge the human INTERbeing explicitly as the natural form merely from its daily use. One can immediately see the relational nature of individual learning, how it is so entangled with collective learning, and would be reinforced with each social interaction on the web or in real life. This is what is needed to track both individual inner transformation (IIT) as well as collective outer transformation (COT) towards a rapid whole system change mobilization. Accelerated by a program of open access Deep Humanity (DH) knowledge that plumbs the very depth of what it is to be human, this can accelerate the indirect drivers of change and provide practical tools for granular monitoring of both IIT and COT.

      Could we use AI to search for levers and leverage points?

    1. one of the best ways to diversify complexify your search space your assumptions is through experience and one of the great ways to 00:01:18 do that is actually through technology so we think about technology and most of our technologies are good technologies but what defines a great technology what is a transformative technology 00:01:30 the good technologies are the ones that enable us to do what we can already do faster easier more efficient and that's because so much of our society focuses on efficiency it's about maximizing performance right 00:01:42 we're great engineers but we're crap philosophers right we're very good at making things more efficient but that's only one side of innovation we also need the other side of innovation which is creativity 00:01:55 right and so the best technologies are the ones in my view that make the invisible visible they enable us to see things that we can never have seen before 00:02:06 they create assumptions they expand our space of assumptions

      Indyweb is a transformative technology ecosystem that can allow each individual in the group to understand the underlying epistemology of social intercourse, dialogue and symmathesy as a lived experience. Each individual in the open source Indyweb network can have a lived and granular experience of how his or her knowledge and wisdom is growing. This is made possible by having a private information repository that collates all the participant's digital interactions. The interpersonal computing environment puts the human INTERbeing at the center of the digital universe and all the participant's data is not stored in fragmented silos across the web, but all in one central, interpersonal and private repository which (s)he has access to. This creates new possibilities of seeing how your understanding grows from one moment to the next, from one social interaction to the next, and how social, collective learning proceeds and is completely entangled with individual learning.

      Indyweb makes one's learning, previously unconscious and invisible, visible.

    1. Perhaps one of the most important questions to be asked is “What are we not ‘seeing’?.” … “A collaborative project of the late botanists Erwin Lichtenegger and Lore Kutschera celebrates the power and beauty of these otherwise hidden systems through detailed drawings of agricultural crops, shrubs, trees, and weeds. Digitized by the Wageningen University & Research, the extensive archive is the culmination of 40 years of research in Austria that involved cultivating and carefully retrieving developed plant life from the soil for study. It now boasts more than 1,000 renderings of the winding, spindly roots, some of which branch multiple feet wide.”

      These drawings are metaphors for the human meaningverse of an individual and the visible and invisible aspects of our ideas that we present to the rest of the world.

      What is of greatest meaning lives in the individual's salience landscape. That salience landscape is the result of a lifetime of sense-making - all the books we've ever read, talks or presentations we've ever listened to, conversations we've had, courses we've studied. While the other person may have an idea of what is important to us, they are clueless of how that salience landscape came to be.

      This vast network of formative events is usually invisible to the OTHER.

      The public, open source Indyweb that is currently being designed will allow the individual user for the first time to consolidate all his or her digital learning in one place, the user's owned Indyhub. Since Indyweb also has built-in provenance, it will allow traceability of public ideas. This allows the individual to keep track of what would otherwise by invisible and lost - the history of his/her social interaction with ideas.

  4. May 2022
    1. Recognizing that the CEC hyperthreat operates at micro and macro scales across most forms of human activity and that a whole-of-society approach is required to combat it, the approach to the CEC hyperthreat partly relies on a philosophical pivot. The idea here is that a powerful understanding of the CEC hyperthreat (how it feels, moves, and operates), as well as the larger philosophical and survival-based reasons for hyper-reconfiguration, enables all actors and groups to design their own bespoke solutions. Consequently, the narrative and threat description act as a type of orchestration tool across many agencies. This is like the “shared consciousness” idea in retired U.S. Army general Stanley A. McChrystal’s “team of teams” approach to complexity.7       Such an approach is heavily dependent on exceptional communication of both the CEC hyperthreat and hyper-response pathways, as well as providing an enabling environment in terms of capacity to make decisions, access information and resources. This idea informs Operation Visibility and Knowability (OP VAK), which will be described later.  

      Such an effort will require a supporting worldwide digital ecosystem. In the recent past, major evolutionary transitions (MET) (Robin et al, 2021) of our species have been triggered by radical new information systems such as spoken language, and then inscribed language. Something akin to a Major Competitive Transitions (MCT) may be required to accompany a radical transition to a good anthropocene. (See annotation: https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.frontiersin.org%2Farticles%2F10.3389%2Ffevo.2021.711556%2Ffull&group=world)

      If large data is ingested into a public Indyweb, because Indyweb is naturally a graph database, a salience landscape can be constructed of the hyperthreat and data visualized in its multiple dimensions and scales.

      Metaphorically, it can manifest as a hydra with multiple tentacles reach out to multiple scales and dimensions. VR and AR technology can be used to expose the hyperobject and its progression.

      The proper hyperthreat is not climate change alone, although that is the most time sensitive dimension of it, but rather the totality of all blowbacks of human progress...the aggregate of all progress traps that have been allowed to grow, through a myopic prioritization of profit over global wellbeing due to the invisibility of the hyperobject, from molehills into mountains.

    2. However, deep framing analysis directs that a frame or narrative is not static, but rather holds that to remain truthful, the frame or narrative necessarily evolves in an intra-active way with other “matter.

      The public Indyweb supports this through its inherent conversational structure and focus on knowledge at the edge.

    3. a society-wide hyperconversation. This hyperconversation operationalizes continuous discourse, including its differentiation and emergent framing aspects. It aims to assist people in developing their own ways of framing and conceiving the problem that makes sense given their social, cultural, and environmental contexts. As depicted in table 1, the hyperconversation also reflects a slower, more deliberate approach to discourse; this acknowledges damaged democratic processes and fractured societal social cohesion. Its optimal design would require input from other relevant disciplines and expertise,

      The public Indyweb is eminently designed as a public space for holding deep, continuous, asynchronous conversations with provenance. That is, if the partcipant consents to public conversation, ideas can be publicly tracked. Whoever reads your public ideas can be traced.and this paper trail is immutably stored, allowing anyone to see the evolution of ideas in real time.

      In theory, this does away with the need for patents and copyrights, as all ideas are traceable to the contributors and each contribution is also known. This allows for the system to embed crowdsourced microfunding, supporting the best (upvoted) ideas to surface.

      Participants in the public Indyweb ecosystem are called Indyviduals and each has their own private data hub called an Indyhub. Since Indyweb is interpersonal computing, each person is the center of their indyweb universe. Through the discoverability built into the Indyweb, anything of immediate salience is surfaced to your private hub. No applications can use your data unless you give exact permission on which data to use and how it shall be used. Each user sets the condition for their data usage. Instead of a user's data stored in silos of servers all over the web as is current practice, any data you generate, in conversation, media or data files is immediately accessible on your own Indyhub.

      Indyweb supports symmathesy, the exchange of ideas based on an appropriate epistemological model that reflects how human INTERbeings learn as a dynamic interplay between individual and collective learning. Furthermore, all data that participants choose to share is immutably stored on content addressable web3 storage forever. It is not concentrated on any server but the data is stored on the entire IPFS network:

      "IPFS works through content adddressibility. It is a peer-to-peer (p2p) storage network. Content is accessible through peers located anywhere in the world, that might relay information, store it, or do both. IPFS knows how to find what you ask for using its content address rather than its location.

      There are three fundamental principles to understanding IPFS:

      Unique identification via content addressing Content linking via directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) Content discovery via distributed hash tables (DHTs)" (Source: https://docs.ipfs.io/concepts/how-ipfs-works/)

      The privacy, scalability, discoverability, public immutability and provenance of the public Indyweb makes it ideal for supporting hyperconversations that emerge tomorrows collectively emergent solutions. It is based on the principles of thought augmentation developed by computer industry pioneers such as Doug Englebart and Ted Nelson who many decades earlier in their prescience foresaw the need for computing tools to augment thought and provide the ability to form Network Improvement Communities (NIC) to solve a new generation of complex human challenges.

    4. A bottom-up approach involves aiming for maximum participation at a society-wide level. While this relates to achieving “mass and speed” of response, it also connects to psychological and philosophical research on the need for belonging and agency. One way a bottom-up approach can achieve maximum participation is through asking individuals, “How do you help us win?” or “How do you help us reach our destination of safe Earth?” This differs from most employment circumstances that issue top-down-directed work. It is anticipated that surprising answers will emerge, which allows people to align their aptitude and best skills to the mission. Two examples follow: Retired elite athletes have skills in goal setting, visualizing success, and motivating action. They could be employed as ecocoaches, supporting teams that are working on difficult transition tasks or leading health and fitness programs for the community. An elderly woman loves exploring thrift shops. She might contribute in circular economy and local recycling programs.

      Indyweb harnesses the wisdom of the crowd. By providing a global space for meaningful dialogue, exchange and sharing, a diversity of solutions will emerge

    5. “low-hanging fruit”

      IPCC AR6 WGIII Chapter 5: demand, services and social aspects of mitigation identifies that up to 45% of mitigation can result from a demand-side socialization strategy and collective action mobilization. This gives us tremendous power of impact to mobilize people. The low hanging fruit can be identified by comprehensive, ongoing, deep, global conversations with the greatest diversity of actors with a common vision collectively searching for the social tipping points, leverage points and idling resources and scaling massively thru the Indyweb as a cosmolocal network (what's light we share, what's heavy we produce locally).

      Climate scientist and realist Professor Kevin Anderson has argued for many years that demand side changes are the only solutions that can be implemented rapidly enough to peak emissions and drop emissions rapidly in the short term (next few years), buying time for reneewable energy solutions to scale globally.

    6. Its success hinges on not only communication of the problem but also the capacity for humans to undertake synchronized action toward the same goal. Coordination, cooperation, teamwork, and leadership skills become significant to survival capacity.  

      A global syncrhonizing event such as a regularly held Tipping Point Festival (TPF) to promote and accelerate social tipping points, leverage points and idling resources amongst ordinary citizens and an open wisdom commons, open knowledge commons, open research commons for massive open online collaboration at zero marginal cost is what is required to support this. It would allow global syncrhronization and high efficacy discoverability of openly shared knowledge and solutions.and rapid dissemination and localized clean production for clean provisioning systems appropriate to each community on the planet. Such a system we have tentatively called the Indyweb, where data is privately owned and secure and any data made public is stored immutably. Indyweb becomes an asset owned by humanity itself, with no centralized authority claiming ownership. The technology now exists to make this feasible.