190 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2022
    1. Dance might seem like the creative medium that could leastbenefit from “organizing.”

      I really appreciate that he's actively using examples from across a variety of domains to indicate the depth and breadth of areas which can benefit from commonplacing and note taking domains.

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    1. Kahler et al. (2011)and Kahler (2010) found that wild rice populations in lakes and rivers at the landscape scale tend to behighly distinct from one another and that the St. Louis River estuary may have its own “genetic identity”(Kern and Kahler 2014).

      Highly distinct populations with own genetic identity. Check out these papers for in depth info on Manomin genetic diversity - Kahler et al 2011, Kahler 2010, Kern and Kahler 2014

    1. if the process of seeing differently is the process of first and foremost having awareness of the fact that everything you do has an assumption 00:00:14 figure out what those are and by the way the best person to reveal your own assumptions to you is not yourself it's usually someone else hence the power of diversity the importance of diversity 00:00:26 because not only does that diversity reveal your own assumptions to you but it can also complexify your assumptions right because we know from complex systems theory that the best solution is most likely to 00:00:40 exist within a complex search space not a simple search space simply because of statistics right so whereas a simple search space is more adaptable it's more easily to adapt it's 00:00:52 less likely to contain the best solution so what we really want is a diversity of possibilities a diversity of assumptions which diverse groups for instance enable

      From a Stop Reset Go Deep Humanity perspective, social interactions with greater diversity allows multi-meaningverses to interact and the salience landscape from each conversant can interact. Since each life is unique, the diversity of perspectival knowing allows strengths to overlap weaknesses and different perspectives can yield novelty. The diversity of ideas encounter each other like diversity in a gene pool, evolving more offsprings which may randomly have greater fitness to the environment.

      Johari's window is a direct consequence of this diversity of perspectives, this converged multi-meaningverse of the Lebenswelt..

    1. I’ve also learned, thanks to my doctoral training in sociology, that one must expand one’s personal problems into the structural, to recognize what’s rotten at the local level as an instantiation of the institutional. Our best public sociologists, like Tressie McMillan Cottom and Jess Calarco, do this exceptionally well.
    1. A recent book that advocates for this idea is Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized world by David Epstein. Consider reading Cal Newport’s So Good They Can’t Ignore You along side it: So Good They Can’t Ignore You focuses on building up “career capital,” which is important for everyone but especially people with a lot of different interests.1 People interested in interdisciplinary work (including students graduating from liberal arts or other general programs) might seem “behind” at first, but with time to develop career capital these graduates can outpace their more specialist peers.

      Similar to the way that bi-lingual/dual immersion language students may temporarily fall behind their peers in 3rd and 4th grade, but rocket ahead later in high school, those interested in interdisciplinary work may seem to lag, but later outpace their lesser specializing peers.

      What is the underlying mechanism for providing the acceleration boosts in these models? Are they really the same or is this effect just a coincidence?

      Is there something about the dual stock and double experience or even diversity of thought that provides the acceleration? Is there anything in the pedagogy or productivity research space to explain it?

  2. May 2022
    1. https://colinwalker.blog/?date=2022-03-08#p2

      Some interesting looking female bloggers listed here.

  3. Apr 2022
    1. Hilda Bastian, PhD. (2021, February 6). Unofficial unnamed AstraZeneca insider says they are doing the interim analysis for the US trial of the Oxford vaccine. AstraZeneca spokesperson says 4-6 weeks till data release. Https://t.co/VUHgbHN02d One is wrong? Or they’ll release only when have FDA minimum follow-up? Https://t.co/LgjfX8AIti [Tweet]. @hildabast. https://twitter.com/hildabast/status/1357862227106095105

    1. Even as he was critical of overabundance, Gesner exulted in it, seeking exhaustiveness in his accumulation of both themes and works from which others could choose according to their judgment and interests.

      Note here the presumed freedom to pick and choose based on interest and judgement. Who's judgement really? Book banning and religious battles would call to question which people got to exercise their own judgement.

  4. Mar 2022
    1. Refinement is a social process

      The idea that refinement is a social process is a powerful one, but it is limited by the society's power structures, scale, and access to the original material and least powerful person's ability to help refine it.

    2. There is a growing risk that advancing technology will widen the gap between rich and poor, and produce further disadvantages for poorly educated citizens.

      Nice that he takes this sort of inclusive approach so early in the evolution of the internet.

  5. Feb 2022
    1. But the coverage, as our editorial page later noted in 2018, “deplored the inhumanity of the perpetrators without ever really acknowledging the humanity of the victims” or the community terrorized by their brutal deaths. The ire was directed at the “poor, white trash” killers, as Mencken put it; there was no empathy for — or even real interest in — the Black victims.
    2. Pretending we were all the same never worked, because it ignored the fact that we’re not all given the same opportunities to succeed or fail on our merits; some are privileged, others are oppressed. Refusing to recognize that only prolonged difficult conversations and much-needed soul-searching, dooming more generations to repeat the cycle.
    1. First, consider who gets to make the rules. Tenured scholars who, as we’ve noted, are mostly white and male, largely make the rules that determine who else can join the tenured ranks. This involves what sociologists call “boundary work,” or the practice of a group setting rules to determine who is good enough to join. And as such, many of the rules established around tenure over the years work really well for white scholars, but don’t adequately capture the contributions of scholars of color.

      Boundary work is the practice of a group that sets the rules to determine who is and isn't good enough to join the group.

      Link to Groucho Marx quote, "I refuse to join any club that would have me as a member."

    1. 11 different ethnic groups,
    2. law prohibits any discrimination and guarantee all persons equal and effective protection against discrimination on any ground such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.56
    3. promotion of multilingualism and the maintenance of indigenous practices
    4. the maintenance of such gender and role conceptions in Namibian society at large

      patriarchal stereotypes of men and women throughout Namibia, but they vary from each individual culture in specifics

  6. Jan 2022
    1. A recent addition to the writer-editor-reader relationship is something called a “sensitivity reader,” that is someone of diverse background who can advise on dicey cultural matters whom writers are now encouraged to consult.
    2. You live only until an objection scares the people whose job is more and more to avoid objections — that new, primary executive function.

      Are there other examples of this job function in the broader American culture? What do these job descriptions and titles look like?

  7. Dec 2021
  8. Nov 2021
    1. Poultry scientists have also succeeded in selecting for parthenogenesis, increasing the incidence in Beltsville small white turkeys more than threefold, to 41.5 percent in five generations. Environmental factors—like high temperatures or a viral infection—also seem to trigger poultry parthenogenesis.

      Parthenogenesis can be selected for in breeding.

      What might this look like in other animal models. What do the long term effects of such high percentages potentially look like?

      Could this be a tool for guarding against rising temperatures in the looming climate crisis?

    1. There’s a tendency to refer to people, or a person, as “diverse.” Even with the best intentions, referring to people this way feels a lot like euphemism for “outside the majority,” or “different from the dominant group.”
  9. Oct 2021
    1. “Hurry up and do it before someone else does!” she told him. And so he did.

      At least he did it quickly as possible because it's a known fact that people can have similar ideas as you.

      article

    1. ephemera

      Definition of ephemera 1: something of no lasting significance —usually used in plural

      2 ephemera plural : paper items (such as posters, broadsides, and tickets) that were originally meant to be discarded after use but have since become collectibles

      merriam webster

    2. A handful of African-American designers seemed exempt from Modernism’s influence, which may be because they didn’t work in advertising or commerce.

      This is not surprising at all. Funny thing is just as he mentioned that...it made me realize there's barely any black designers being known, especially around that time.

    1. The podcast focuses on the troubled history of “objectivity” and how it has been used to gatekeep and exclude people of color, queer and trans people, and people organizing for their labor rights and communities.

      I learned about this podcast through Sandy and Nora.

  10. Sep 2021
    1. "If you look at a map of the distribution of languages around the world and you compare it with maps that show the distribution of mammal species or bird species, you see an extraordinarily similar picture: The hot spots of linguistic diversity, in so many cases, coincide with hot spots of biological diversity," he said.

      Making the connection between language diversity and biodiversity.

  11. Aug 2021
    1. This now brings diversity to the table. It is deliberately interdisciplinary. Notes from poets interact with notes from scientists and notes from wise elders.

      This is the closest phrase I've seen in the zettelkasten space that ties back directly into the commonplace book tradition of sententiae.

      Kudos to the author for this.

      I like the fact that he highlights the diversity of thought he's getting by plumbing the depths of a variety of types of writers and creators. Very reminiscent of another early commonplace book tradition of the bee analogy.

  12. Jul 2021
  13. Jun 2021
    1. Panel: The Future of Note Taking (FoNT) Speakers engaged in reimagining the technology and practices of digital note taking will discuss their work and engage each other and attendees in conversation. The panel will be moderated by Dan Whaley (Hypothesis) and feature speakers Ward Cunningham (FedWiki), Daniel Doyon (Readwise), Bastien Guerry (Org-mode), Eduardo Ivanec (Agora), Oliver Sauter (Memex), Conor White Sullivan (Roam), and Junyu Zhan (Logseq).

      For this panel I think it might have been useful to have someone like Maggie Appleton participate for her perspective with respect to some of the history, design, and even anthropology of this space.

      Anne-Laure Le Cunff might have been an interesting participant for her leadership and writing on use and UI as well as thinking about "why" note taking.

      I'd also nominate Argentina Ortega Sáinz for her work on academic integrations of Zotero with tools like Obsidian.

      Perhaps worth noting when revisiting this topic next year? cc: @dwhly @nateangell @hypothesis

    1. The ecosystem behind React gave you too many choices of this sort, which fragmented the tech stack and caused the infamous “Javascript fatigue”.

      To me, the reason React ruined web development is because it homogenized & centralized the practice, in an abstraction that is decoupled & non-interoperable with other techniques & styles.

      The author is arguing that React didn't centralize enough, but to me, it sucked all the oxygen out of the diverse interesting place that was web development. That it didn't try to solve all problems in the stack is, if anything, a most relief. It succeeded because it didn't bundle in a data-layer. It succeeded because it didn't bundle in state. It succeeded because it didn't bundle in routing. Each of these areas have evolved independently & seen great strides across the last half decade. That's a huge win, that's why React is so strong: because it didn't try to form opinions.

      Alas React itself implies a strong opinion, has a big abstraction that de-empowers & de-inter-operates with the DOM, that keeps it from working in concert with any other technology. It has enormous diversity, but only under it's own umbrella. It has crushed a much livelier sporting aspect of web development.

      I'm so tired of weenies complaining about fragmentation. Get lost and fuck off. This medium is flexible & diverse & interesting. Stop applying your industrial software want, your software authoritarianism, "why can't everyone just do it my way/the right way" horse shit. Such a shitty attitude, from people selling FUD & clutching at the idea that everyone's gonna be happy & productive if we can just make the right framework. How uncreative & droll.

    1. include a commitment to diversity in the selection process for who we bring into our community.

      구성원을 받을 때 있어 commitment to diversity 가 있어. (구체적인건 안나오네 ㅠㅜ)

  14. May 2021
    1. we all may appear to be different on the outside, but we are all made up of the same things in the inside.

      Teach a child to see the shared humanity in all of us. And part of that commonality is to have our own quirks. We need to find teach to see that balance and nuance.

  15. Apr 2021
    1. Can we reconfigure growth to mean richness in difference? Flourishing interdependent diversity of networks, network protocols and forms of interaction? What does this mean for digital decay, and can the decay of files, applications and networks become some form of compost, or what might be the most dignified form of digital death and rebirth?

      Also see Apoptosis

  16. Mar 2021
    1. Back in 1987, Cheris Kramarae wrote in Technology and Women’s Voices: Keeping in Touch:“Technological processes developed by men for men are nearly always interpreted by women in ways other than those intended by men.”
    1. Student reflections on micro-credentials earned through the CCoL Global Leaders Program show that students remain skeptical of the efficacy of micro-credentials in college admissions decisions. This adds credence to the belief that micro-credentials can serve as a framework for increasing student agency and promoting 21st Century learning goals, yet more could be done to communicate the value of micro-credentials to those earning them. If “value” is a function of what colleges look at in admissions decisions, and colleges need good examples in order to develop a systematic and fair way to assess badge submissions, this could present a chicken-and-egg problem.

      Highlights the need for a holistic approach - the ecosystem idea. Efficacy relates to the perceived goal, and if a common goal is to increase inclusion and diversity in higher education then Colleges need to determine the criteria they will use to evaluate a range of badges.

  17. Feb 2021
    1. A woman of color will often experience more discrimination in the workplace than a white woman.

      when considering DEI efforts, we need to consider race - I've read a few things before on how if focusing on Women, it tends to default to white women, and can end up implementing things that exclude Black women - even if it's not intentional, it can undermine DEI efforts

    2. “Gender bias holds women back from being hired and advancing in their careers. It’s important to be aware of how that manifests,” says Raena Saddler from Lean In. That’s why Lean In created an activity that helps you combat gender bias at work. It’s called 50 Ways to Fight Bias, and the digital versions are free. Raena explains, “This activity is an engaging way to think through your own biases and call out and navigate bias when you see it in the wild.”

      we all have biases, conscious and unconscious - being aware of these, and knowing at what points to look out for them is important.

  18. Jan 2021
  19. Dec 2020
  20. Nov 2020
    1. A quick clarification — it’s important to note I’m differentiating “Diversity of Thought” from neurodiversity, which aims to make room for neurological differences (Dyslexia, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Autistic Spectrum, Tourette Syndrome, and others) and advocates for access to various communities often marginalized.

      It's good to call out the distinction from [[neurodiversity]] from [[cognitive diversity]] and [[diversity of thought]]

      When thinking of [[neurodiversity]] - there is also the intersectionality of being Black, a Person of Color, etc and being neurodiverse.

    2. “Diversity of Thought” without Diverse Representation is Status Quo

      [[diversity of thought]] needs [[diverse representation]] - diversity of thought should be an outcome, by not the goal.

    1. 4 Steps to Getting Started with Cognitive Diversity Don’t expect that bringing together a bunch of people with widely different backgrounds and experiences will be the miracle cure for all your business problems. Go beyond the surface to get the benefits of diversity of thought: Define cognitive diversity within your organization and measure it Provide the tools to make it practical and tangible Develop leaders who encourage cognitive diversity, facilitate it, and manage it Apply your awareness. of your team's cognitive diversity to think differently about stubborn challenges and tough problems

      [[Cognitive Diversity]]

  21. Oct 2020
  22. Sep 2020
    1. It gets even better with diversity. The more diverse the peo-ple in that room are, the better the idea will be. I don’t only mean demographic diversity (though I don’t not mean that, either), but also what I like to call horizontal and vertical diversity. Horizontal diversity comes from people represent-ing multiple disciplines and functions within a company (IT, legal, marketing, sales, and so forth); vertical diversity comes from different positions on the org chart (C-suite execs, managers, practitioners, entry-level workers).

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    1. There are other mathematical models of institutionalized bias out there! Male-Female Differences: A Computer Simulation shows how a small gender bias compounds as you move up the corporate ladder. The Petrie Multiplier shows why an attack on sexism in tech is not an attack on men.
  23. Aug 2020
    1. Even if you account for pattern recognition, though, a simple math problem limits the impact of anonymous hiring. You can treat everyone in, say, a web-development hiring pool fairly, but the odds of anyone in that pool coming from a marginalized group are still fairly low. That, too, derives from a long and storied systemic problem involving educational opportunities and wealth disparity that, sadly, we can’t solve by getting rid of a few form fields.

      There are potentially other hidden biases in our pool of samples we need to make sure are fixed for some of these bias fixes to "really" work.

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  24. Jul 2020
    1. Sapoval, N., Mahmoud, M., Jochum, M. D., Liu, Y., Elworth, R. A. L., Wang, Q., Albin, D., Ogilvie, H., Lee, M. D., Villapol, S., Hernandez, K., Berry, I. M., Foox, J., Beheshti, A., Ternus, K., Aagaard, K. M., Posada, D., Mason, C., Sedlazeck, F. J., & Treangen, T. J. (2020). Hidden genomic diversity of SARS-CoV-2: Implications for qRT-PCR diagnostics and transmission. BioRxiv, 2020.07.02.184481. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.07.02.184481

  25. Jun 2020
  26. May 2020
  27. Feb 2020
    1. THATCamp was non-hierarchical. Before the first THATCamp, I had never attended a conference—nor have I been to once since my last THATCamp, alas—that included tenured and non-tenured and non-tenure-track faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, librarians and archivists and museum professionals, software developers and technologists of all kinds, writers and journalists, and even curious people from well beyond academia and the cultural heritage sector—and that truly placed them at the same level when the entered the door.

      I wish I'd known about them before they disappeared.

      The only equivalent conference I've been to with this sort of diversity was the Reynolds Journalism Institute's Dodging the Memory Hole conferences. That diversity really does make things magical.

  28. Dec 2019
    1. 2020 will also bring a more concerted effort on my part to both amplify the women in my network who blog, and both comment and refer back to their blogs. To use what they write as a starting off point for my own posts more.
  29. Nov 2019
  30. Oct 2019
    1. Diverse employees at 7-Eleven score the company 64/100 across various culture categories, placing 7-Eleven in the bottom 45% of companies in the United States with 10,000+ Employees for Comparably's diversity score. The Diversity score provides insights into how diverse employees feel and rate their work experience at 7-Eleven across various culture dimensions.Women at 7-ElevenCWomen at 7-Eleven have rated Environment, Manager, and Work Culture as the highest categories they have scored.BOTTOM45%7-Eleven ranks in the bottom 45% of other companies in the US with 10,000+ Employees for Gender Score.Diversity at 7-ElevenCDiverse employees at 7-Eleven have rated Environment, Executive Team, and Work Culture as the highest categories they have scored.BOTTOM45%7-Eleven ranks in the bottom 45% of other companies in the US with 10,000+ Employees for Diversity Score.
    1. Mr Booth often uses his newspaper to rail against climate change

      Oh good one - I can't believe you're only a work experience student - there's a bunch of people at the SMH who are highly-paid and you at least match them for mediocrity. Yes, the climate change mention should well and truly stir the juices of your readers and that's always preferable to the trend towards falling asleep mid-article. Do you think there should be a law against newspaper proprietors voicing their opinions because it never ever happens? (NOTE: And I know what you're thinking. Imagine having views and opinion that stray from a collective decision on what to believe - it would be such a hassle)

  31. Sep 2019
    1. “In biology, you never have a single cell doing something. You have a group of cells,” Emonet said. “The diversity will affect the average performance of the group.”

      Important even at the level of companies and nations. Diversity is a good thing.

  32. Jul 2019
    1. NGSS is a more deliberate coming together of educational members who were given the task to make equity and diversity issues prominent in framing the standards

      big step forward, diversity exists! This view shows a step up (backwards/deeper?) of a level in ones awareness-system. Public acknowledgement is a first step...

    1. Would they react as the police captain in Plainfield, Ind., did when his female colleague told him during a diversity-training session that he benefited from “white male privilege”? He became angry and accused her of using a racialized slur against him. (She was placed on paid administrative leave, and a reprimand was placed permanently in her file.)

      Seriously?!

  33. Jan 2019
    1. Active-learning techniques — like sharing the responsibility for leading discussions or framing classroom expectations with our students — show them they indeed belong in this "scholarly space" and give them the confidence to engage with the course and one another.

      The ProfHacker article by Maha Bali and Steve Greenlaw explores this more concretely. Active learning for inclusion needs to be scaffolded in such a way that it does not reinforce the privilege of dominant cultures and personalities.

    2. Am I having my students read a bunch of monographs, all authored by white males, for example?

      We need better ways to incentivize the finding and sharing of these more diverse arrays of knowledge forms and knowledge producers, particularly I think at introductory levels. When faculty balk at the labor of finding appropriate and diverse readings, we need resources to show that some of the work has already been done.

    1. It is important for the instructor to determine what the problem is for each particular class.

      This feels like one of the big issues in "inclusive pedagogy" - the desire for one-size-fits-all solutions necessarily opposes the goal of treating each person as an equal individual. (That said, "one size fits most" solutions are important steps forward.)