78 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2018
  2. Oct 2018
  3. cloud.degrowth.net cloud.degrowth.net
    1. There are all these different structures. Thirdly, we need to inter-pollinate, and share these experiences. We need the culture of dialogue. We need to learn how to communicate in different ways- to share patterns, dance, paint etc. Finally, I would like to call it a carnival, and not a confluence- including different worlds,
    2. If we are so sick of war, we have to stop thinking of fighting against something. We cant fight the big system, but rather making visible all the small beautiful stuff, so that all the bad things would lose power. So observing our own pattern of seeing. The need for celebrating and sharing is so important. We can pass years without even knowing each other. So learning how to embrace diversities, and other ways of communicating

      Great thought.

  4. Sep 2018
    1. Like the art industry, art history has not done enough to diversify its student and faculty demography. Few students of colour earn the doctoral degrees now expected by most museums for entry-level curatorial positions.

      How do we create piplines to encourage POC students to enter this profession? Eliminate internship and hiring practices that prohibit individuals with limited incomes from pursuing this career path!

    2. 2015 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation study which found that only four percent of curators in US museums are black
  5. Apr 2018
    1. Nay if we may openly speak the Truth and as becomes one Man to another; neither Pagan, nor Mahumetan, [59] nor Jew, ought to be excluded from the Civil Rights of the Commonwealth, because of his Religion.158

      I was taken by just how clearly Locke, in the 17th century, speaks in support of religious diversity and a separation between church and state (I highlighted many remarks and passages in this work). This will be a powerful document to allow students to read in conjunction with the first amendment.

  6. Mar 2018
  7. Dec 2017
    1. This is an ongoing conversation and argument that goes back for years. If I’m in an environment with a bunch of technical men, and I say, you know, we’re doing this thing that excludes people, they’ll say, “What are you complaining about? At least you’re on the good side of it.” And my response is, “Actually, from a purely selfish point of view, it does hurt me because I’m in this weird echo chamber where I’m being told ‘you're a hacker, you’re a technical man, you’re a white man’” and it becomes this ongoing reinforcement where you’re that thing — but the thing is this total artificial bullshit classification that just happens to rise from the resonance of this stupid tool. So while I’m on the beneficial side of it, in some ways, it forces me into this box. I think this kind of thinking hurts everyone, even the people who appear to be the beneficiaries of it. They’re forced into a place where they can’t reach their full potential.
    2. There’s this thing that happened which is that there’s more diversity of ethnicity and background perhaps, but less diversity of cognitive style. If you have a certain kind of nerdy, quantitative problem-solving oriented cognitive style, that will get you more friends, and that will get you along better than if you have a more contemplative, aesthetic center. 
  8. Nov 2017
    1. But the Commissioners are happy in considering the statute under which they are assembled as proof that the legislature is far from the abandonment of objects so interesting: they are sensible that the advantages of well directed education, moral, political & economical are truly above all estimate.

      The selection of what to teach at a University is something I never really considered before now. Like anything else, there is sure to be a difference in opinion of the founders as to what fields of study are worth teaching. Fortunately, they seem to have struck a good balance. This relates to the idea of a "true liberal arts education," one which will produce not only scholars, but well-rounded individuals.

    1. A Professor is proposed for antient Languages, the Latin, Greek and Hebrew, particularly, but these Languages being the foundation common to all the Sciences, it is difficult to foresee what may be the extent of this school. At the same time no greater obstruction to industrious study could be proposed than the presence, the intrusions, and the noisy turbulence of a Multitude of small boys: and if they are to be placed here for the rudiments of the Languages, they may be so numerous, that its character & Value as an university, will be mixed in those of a Grammar school. It is therefore greatly to be wished, that preliminary schools, either on private or public establishment, would be distributed in districts thro the state, as preparatory to the entrance of Students into the University.

      This quotation strikes me particularly as brilliant and also ironic. In the rockfish report, the founders are including not only the foundation of UVA but also a prep. school system to feed into UVA. This is mentioned in with the purpose of including the multiples languages being taught because it is indicative of the element of selective control that UVA was founded to uphold. It seems as if, on top of selectively admitting students who are deemed ideal enough to study at Mr. Jefferson' University, the board finds it crucial to grow generations of boys who will continue to fit their mold for years to come. The idea of preparatory schooling for a university is pretty progressive for the time which makes it brilliant as this model continues to be followed. However, it is ironic as it is going against the "life-long learning" mindset of Jefferson's plans. With a school filled with the exact same type of student, what dynamic between collaboration is there to learn from?

      Muhammad Amjad

  9. Oct 2017
    1. Governance structures designed for platforms supporting pooled analysis of post-publication data by academics will not serve the needs of platforms aiming to provide real-time surveillance data.

      diversity of needs & goals

    2. Data scientists and informatics staff favoured a clear description of the end-use of the database at the design stage; malaria scientists, wishing to maximise the possible uses of this as yet untested resource, preferred to avoid any definition that would foreclose possible future uses. They advocated maximum flexibility, and resisted a tight, purpose-driven design.

      diversity of perspectives again

    3. Researchers were also concerned that the curation process might reveal weaknesses in the data, potentially calling into question published analyses. Interviewees in industry were most worried that re-analysis might yield results that differed slightly from those used in product registration, while some policy-makers had concerns over data ownership.

      well-captured diversity of perspectives

  10. Sep 2017
    1. weak ties make the social networks unique.

      I like this statement. Can we think of uniqueness as also diversity? Do those who benefit most from weak ties have more diverse ties?

  11. Aug 2017
    1. I agree that diversity is necessary, but only useful when paired with acceptance. As Ecks says, when it is paired with positivity it creates pluralism and that moves society steps forward, but when it remains alone it causes conflict. This is extremely true in today's America with its lack of acceptance and trust in the political and religious sense, and in addition to more diversity that is making the country less united and weaker to countries with no religious freedoms.

    1. An excellent meditation that brings out the problem in today's computing culture: under-representation of the minority and females in computing, starting with the students and all the way up to venture capitalists and the culture. It is interesting how Bogost talks about alternative scenarios. Looks like this is a disbalance of power.

    2. A Googler's Would-Be Manifesto Reveals Tech's Rotten Core
  12. Jul 2017
  13. Jun 2017
    1. The digital humanities as a humanitiesproject

      Svensson, Patrik. 2012. “The Digital Humanities as a Humanities Project.” Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 11 (1–2): 42–60. doi:10.1177/1474022211427367.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. I think it's natural for like-minded people to group together but the longer that process continues the more of an echo chamber it becomes. What's worse is the longer you wait to try to get people involved in the project that would naturally not try to join the harder it will be. When your team is 4 men, the first woman which joins will make a significant impact. When your team is already 20 men you need to get a lot more women on board to have the same impact. But it's not just gender that is making a difference, it's in particular cultural backgrounds. The reason Unicode is hard is not because Unicode is hard, but because a lot of projects start out with a lack of urgency since many of the original developers might live in ASCII constrained environments (It took emojis to become popular for people to develop a general understanding of why Unicode is useful in the western world).

      First time I've seen the slowness of emoji to be presented as a diversity issue. Given how well used they are, it's a good example of how diverse teams miss features that may seem obvious in retrospect.

  14. May 2017
    1. “organise the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful”.

      Google obviously wants to have all the answers to all possible absurd questions. The danger with this goal is that they positioned the persons that represents part of the diversity of the world as not worthy of being treated with respect.

  15. Feb 2017
    1. A reflective writing technique that encourages personal reflection, provides opportunities for all voices to be heard, and leads to deeper, more thoughtful conversations

      Shared Writing: This seems particularly useful for online conversations that are asynchronous, as it is based on reading statements, commenting on them, and passing the comments around.

    2. Hatful of Quotes

      Like this one, particularly if quotes are well-chosen, especially in a larger group that otherwise has not done much reading/thought about questions of privilege, discrimination, and marginalized experiences.

    3. circLE oFobJEcts

      I like this activity if the aim is to make personal connections and get to know the individuals involved in a learning group. As a result, probably best for a small group. Requires some preparation as participants have to be asked to bring an object to the meeting.

    4. 80Identity Groups

      Interesting activity. Question: Is this useful in a larger group, or only in a smaller group? The calling-out portion enables people to participate without talking, which accommodates larger numbers; but the exposure can be intimidating – particularly for students, who then may just stay put. Maybe start with "easy" identity groups – sports team supporters? – that people are willing to show? Or would this undermine what the conversation should be about?

      The discussion portion may get out of hand in a larger group; may need subgroup formation.

  16. Jan 2017
    1. “really disrupt and complexify ... what they believe they know about race [and] students or families who live in poverty.”
  17. Dec 2016
    1. “Because you don’t come up with the right answer if everyone at the table looks the same and thinks the same and has the same experience – you never come up with the best answer. So when you get these seats at these tables of power, your obligation is to make sure the conversation is diverse.”

      Well said.

  18. Nov 2016
    1. Many Latin American countries hold similar celebrations, with some colorful regional differences:  In Ecuador, the Day of the Dead is observed with ceremonial foods such as colada morada, a spiced fruit porridge, and guagua de pan, a bread shaped like a swaddled infant

      Different traditions in many places for the same holiday.

  19. Oct 2016
    1. celebrate the season, there are thousands of suitably macabre images in the Artstor Digital Library

      museum for halloween images all over,

    2. Guatemalans build and fly giant kites
    3. Ecuador, the Day of the Dead is observed with ceremonial foods

      celebrated by having their cutures favorite food.

    4. Many Latin American countries hold similar celebrations, with some colorful regional differences:

      same but different

    5. People in Mexico often build altars using brightly decorated sugar skulls, marigolds (popularly known as Flor de Muerto, “Flower of the Dead”),

      differnt beliefs within a culture

    6. the celebration conflates the Catholic holidays with an Aztec festival dedicated to a goddess called Mictecacihuatl, the “Lady of the Dead.”

      Aztecs honor a god

    7. Mexico is known as Día de los Muertos, “Day of the Dead,”

      Honor the dead in Mexico

    8. Roman Catholic heritage, All Saints Day and All Souls Day (November 2)

      different day for a different religion with a different reason.

  20. Sep 2016
    1. As many universities are being queried by the federal government on how they spend their endowment money, and enrollment decreases among all institutions nationally, traditional campuses will need to look at these partnerships as a sign of where education is likely going in the future, and what the federal government may be willing to finance with its student loan programs going ahead.

      To me, the most interesting about this program is that it sounds like it’s targeting post-secondary institutions. There are multiple programs to “teach kids to code”. Compulsory education (primary and secondary) can provide a great context for these, in part because the type of learning involved is so broad and pedagogical skills are so recognized. In post-secondary contexts, however, there’s a strong tendency to limit coding to very specific contexts, including Computer Science or individual programs. We probably take for granted that people who need broad coding skills can develop them outside of their college and university programs. In a way, this isn’t that surprising if we’re to compare coding to very basic skills, like typing. Though there are probably many universities and colleges where students can get trained in typing, it’s very separate from the curriculum. It might be “college prep”, but it’s not really a college prerequisite. And there isn’t that much support in post-secondary education. Of course, there are many programs, in any discipline, giving a lot of weight to coding skills. For instance, learners in Digital Humanities probably hone in their ability to code, at some point in their career. And it’s probably hard for most digital arts programs to avoid at least some training in programming languages. It’s just that these “general” programs in coding tend to focus almost exclusively on so-called “K–12 Education”. That this program focuses on diversity is also interesting. Not surprising, as many such initiatives have to do with inequalities, real or perceived. But it might be where something so general can have an impact in Higher Education. It’s also interesting to notice that there isn’t much in terms of branding or otherwise which explicitly connects this initiative with colleges and universities. Pictures on the site show (diverse) adults, presumably registered students at universities and colleges where “education partners” are to be found. But it sounds like the idea of a “school” is purposefully left quite broad or even ambiguous. Of course, these programs might also benefit adult learners who aren’t registered at a formal institution of higher learning. Which would make it closer to “para-educational” programs. In fact, there might something of a lesson for the future of universities and colleges.

    2. As many universities are being queried by the federal government on how they spend their endowment money, and enrollment decreases among all institutions nationally, traditional campuses will need to look at these partnerships as a sign of where education is likely going in the future, and what the federal government may be willing to finance with its student loan programs going ahead.

      To me, the most interesting about this program is that it sounds like it’s targeting post-secondary institutions. There are multiple programs to “teach kids to code”. Compulsory education (primary and secondary) can provide a great context for these, in part because the type of learning involved is so broad and pedagogical skills are so recognized. In post-secondary contexts, however, there’s a strong tendency to limit coding to very specific contexts, including Computer Science or individual programs. We probably take for granted that people who need broad coding skills can develop them outside of their college and university programs. In a way, this isn’t that surprising if we’re to compare coding to very basic skills, like typing. Though there are probably many universities and colleges where students can get trained in typing, it’s very separate from the curriculum. It might be “college prep”, but it’s not really a college prerequisite. And there isn’t that much support in post-secondary education. Of course, there are many programs, in any discipline, giving a lot of weight to coding skills. For instance, learners in Digital Humanities probably hone in their ability to code, at some point in their career. And it’s probably hard for most digital arts programs to avoid at least some training in programming languages. It’s just that these “general” programs in coding tend to focus almost exclusively on so-called “K–12 Education”. That this program focuses on diversity is also interesting. Not surprising, as many such initiatives have to do with inequalities, real or perceived. But it might be where something so general can have an impact in Higher Education. It’s also interesting to notice that there isn’t much in terms of branding or otherwise which explicitly connects this initiative with colleges and universities. Pictures on the site show (diverse) adults, presumably registered students at universities and colleges where “education partners” are to be found. But it sounds like the idea of a “school” is purposefully left quite broad or even ambiguous. Of course, these programs might also benefit adult learners who aren’t registered at a formal institution of higher learning. Which would make it closer to “para-educational” programs. In fact, there might something of a lesson for the future of universities and colleges.

  21. Jul 2016
    1. what is the English-speaking world missing out on by not reading the content written in other languages

      Though he’s been associated with a very strange idea he never had, Edward Sapir was quite explicit about this loss over a hundred years ago. Thinking specifically about a later passage warning people about the glossocide English language. But it’s been clear in his work from long before that excerpt that we’re missing out when we focus on a single language.

    2. people who are not fluent in English

      In this case, it can apply to quite a few academics who are native speakers of one of the aforementioned “world languages”. Difficult to be a monolingual academic in an exclusively local language. Much easier as a French- or Mandarin-speaker to become an academic without learning much English. And speaking of monolinguals, there is a clear bias in tech towards monolingualism.

    3. the voice of the rest of the world
    4. a handful in a few major world languages

      One might think that those other languages are well-represented. People connected with the Open Knowledge Foundation are currently tackling this very issue. Here, Open Education isn’t just about content.

    5. A Postcolonial Look at the Future of #EdTech

      Timely. Sent it to a few people, already, as it connects with several discussions we’ve been having on neocolonialism in EdTech, including the content side of Open Education (OER). Some of it reminds me of Crissinger’s critical take on OER, based on her experience with Open Access.

    1. Bridging the Digital Divide

      Really wish people were to consider the multiple divides which affect digital inclusion. That notion has been a significant part of the subtext in our Cyberspace sociology course. Explicitly discussed here: doi:10.1111/jcom.12045 It’s a bit like Belshaw’s use of the plural to discuss literacies. Makes it more difficult to claim that we’ve completely solved the issue if we acknowledge its diversity and complexity.

    1. help TAs — especially those from other countries
    2. While TAs are intended to help students understand the material, their teaching skills vary and they come at the job with widely different backgrounds.
    3. The ultimate goal of the project is to support improved teaching and learning in university classrooms by bridging cultural divides between students and their teachers.

      Did not expect this line of thinking, from the headline.

    1. make money for Californian white people

      The Man is Californian.

    2. At Google, I'll be encouraged to take annual Bias-Busting training, gathering with other privileged honkeys to encourage one another's virtuous respect of black coworkers we don't have.
    3. Google decided to close Atlanta engineering, and they mainly went as a group to Square
    1. It creates resentment towards minorities because you are forced to take take this training that treats them like charity cases which in turn encourages the “lowering the bar” mentality.
    2. It encourages thinking that “you’ve done your part” since you’ve been taken training on diversity
    3. feel they are extremely open minded & tolerant

      Self-reported open-mindedness is a bit like bragging about being “cool”.

    4. technical interviews are completely worthless as a predictor for whether someone is a good hire or not
    1. We believe that America’s diversity is our strength.

      Apart from the political context for such statements, it’s interesting to note that a link between innovation and diversity is made more frequently in technology than in education (where diversity is taken as a challenge).

    1. Black students in these schools took AP Physics at almost 11 times the rate as black students elsewhere, and they passed the exams at 3.4 times the rate

      1100% is a lot of percent.

    1. How does the increasing diversity of our student population make good teaching more challenging and what is the best approach to meeting that challenge?

      At the same time, this is partly a loaded question. From another perspective (say, in anthro), diversity is richness. It’s part of a broader context. Teachers do need to vent about new challenges. Some may even think that diversity is what makes their lives more difficult. And they may wish for that time when all students were exactly alike.

  22. Jun 2016
  23. www.nybooks.com www.nybooks.com
    1. “When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.”
    1. The War on Stupid People

      Lots of difficult things with this text, including the title. The obsession on measurable “smarts” is an important topic and the possible measures to prevent this obsession from impacting (US) society make sense. But it’s really tricky to discuss intelligence in such ways. Part of the text reads as further essentialisation of measured intelligence. Yet it sounds clear from the possible measures described that this form of intelligence takes at least part of its meaning in a given social context.

      Maybe the deep issue with a text like this is that it’s hard to get people to shift from one consistent mindframe (paradigm, episteme) to another. More specifically, it’s hard to discuss intelligence in a context where the concept has become so loaded.

      Would have lots more to say about this from my parents’ experiences (an occupational therapist who spent a career with people labelled as having “intellectual disabilities” and a psychopedagogue who worked in “special education” with students from a low-income neighbourhood who had “learning disabilities”). Maybe later.

    1. we need to broaden perceptions and stereotypes of CS

      Though it’s probably a simple mistake, the notion that Google is “broadening … stereotypes of CS” might have some truth to it.

    1. Prescriptivists dislike the use of “impact” as a verb

      Glad Anglophone prescriptivists aren’t having their way. If they did, chances are that the language would have a similar fate to German as a colonial language. Chances are that a predilection for normative language has greatly impacted language insecurity among Francophones.

  24. Apr 2016
  25. Nov 2015
    1. Because the sad thing about empathy is that we are more likely to be empathetic toward people who remind us of ourselves. Where it is easier to imagine ourselves in their shoes. On a second level, we are more likely to empathize with a group of people of whom we know some personally (or at least we know of/about them) because in reality I deeply believe that most people are good. And so if you know enough people of a certain category, most of them will be good. When we don’t know anyone from a certain category we are likely to dehumanize them
    1. particularly for women of color.
    2. college was never quite as uniform as we thought it was

      Again, the “Myth of the average student”.

    3. wide range of metacognitive skills
    4. open access

      Not really what we tend to mean by “open access” in academia, but closer to “open education” than one might assume. It can be less about the cost of textbooks than about inclusion. And diversity.

  26. Jun 2015
    1. Can't be 100% sure because of the people who have no profile pictures, but fairly certain the Mendeley team here is entirely white males, other than there 3 token women.

    2. Management

      Oh look, the entire management is male and white (although Dr. Henning looks like he could be mixed)

  27. Dec 2013
    1. Well-intentioned (and grammatically correct) though it may be, changing pronouns has very little impact on inclusivity. When you’re starting from a default position of exclusivity, when people automatically associate you with the tone-deaf cringefests that are one of open source’s worst problems, when people see your community and your leadership and find very few diverse participants, when your actions don’t illustrate how people can play a role if they won’t prove themselves better coders than those already involved, hanging up a sign saying “no one is disallowed” is not going to be enough. Saying you want to be inclusive does not create a culture of inclusivity.

      Actions, not words.

  28. Oct 2013
    1. Foreign words, like men, and like many of our institutions, have come to us, I might almost say, from all nations.

      Language is formed on complex interactions and has many histories, especially English. It cannot be classified as our language and other language because these so often overlap