14 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2018
    1. Half of Americans say news and current events matter a lot to their daily lives, while 30 percent say the news doesn’t have much to do with them. The rest aren’t sure. A quarter of Americans say they paid a lot of attention to the news on Tuesday, with 32 percent paying just some attention, 26 percent paying not very much attention and 18 percent paying no attention at all. Forty-seven percent thought the news was at least a little busier than average. Of those who paid any attention to the news on Tuesday, 32 percent spent an hour or more reading, watching or listening. About 23 percent spent 30 minutes to an hour, 18 percent spent 15 minutes to half an hour, and 21 percent spent less than 15 minutes. Just 15 percent of those who paid any attention to the news Tuesday have a great deal of trust in the media to state the facts fully, accurately and fairly. Thirty-eight percent have a fair amount of trust, 28 percent don’t have much trust in the media, and 11 percent have none at all. Those who followed the news on Tuesday were most likely to say they had gotten their news from an online news source (42 percent) or local TV (37 percent), followed by national cable TV (33 percent), social media (28 percent), national network news (23 percent), radio (19 percent) and conversations with other people (19 percent). The least popular source was print newspapers and magazines (10 percent).
    2. Most Americans pay at least a little attention to current events, but they differ enormously in where they turn to get their news and which stories they pay attention to. To get a better sense of how a busy news cycle played out in homes across the country, we repeated an experiment, teaming up with YouGov to ask 1,000 people nationwide to describe their news consumption and respond to a simple prompt: “In your own words, please describe what you would say happened in the news on Tuesday.”
  2. Jul 2018
    1. "The internet has become the main threat — a sphere that isn't controlled by the Kremlin," said Pavel Chikov, a member of Russia's presidential human rights council. "That's why they're going after it. Its very existence as we know it is being undermined by these measures."
    2. "Putin was never very fond of the internet even in the early 2000s," said Andrei Soldatov, a Russian investigative journalist who specializes in security services and cyber issues. "When he was forced to think about the internet during the protests, he became very suspicious, especially about social networks. He thinks there's a plot, a Western conspiracy against him. He believes there is a very dangerous thing for him and he needs to put this thing under control."
    1. As I wrote in “Hacking the Attention Economy,” manipulating the media for profit, ideology, and lulz has evolved over time. The strategies that hackers, hoaxers, and haters have taken have become more sophisticated. The campaigns have gotten more intense. And now many of the actors most set on undermining institutionalized information intermediaries are in the most powerful office in the land. They are waging war on the media and the media doesn’t know what to do other than to report on it.
    1. To understand the current information ecosystem, we need to break down three elements:The different types of content that are being created and sharedThe motivations of those who create this contentThe ways this content is being disseminated
  3. Mar 2017
    1. I wandered out of the classroom into the nature on the campus.  I felt the warmth of the Indian Summer on my back, I sat down on the grass.  

      nature ecosystem

    1. I am still an outsider running an underground railway and I am needing folks to guide me: is this connectedcourses System A or a well-disguised System B.

      Both. These are not railway tracks they are intermingled and confusing networks - undergrowth and cash crops

    2. System A is all about integrity and health and the folk not as nodes in a machine, but as a growing, adapting, distributed and living whole. It is the difference between a neighborhood and a housing development.
  4. Dec 2016
  5. Nov 2016
    1. we used 2001–2009 fire counts detected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)

      The success of this model with only small amounts of training data is encouraging for other areas of ecology and environmental science where the available time-series may be short.

    2. Fire season severity, here defined as the sum of satellite-based active fire counts in a 9-month period centered at the peak fire month, depends on multiple parameters that influence fuel moisture levels and fire activity in addition to precipitation, including vapor pressure deficits, wind speeds, ignition sources, land use decisions, and the duration of the dry season. As a result, the relationship between FSS and SSTs may be more complex than the relationships between precipitation and SSTs described above.

      This recognition of additional factors that could influence fire, and the fact it more complex models using the same data may be able to indirectly use some of these influences is really valuable. It is, in effect, positing that latent variables associated with some of these causes may be associated with measurable aspects of SST.

    3. This is a nice example of chaining together separate pieces of knowledge to understand what form of forecasting model might be successful. Large scale climate phenomena -> variation in precipitation -> variation in fire season severity.

  6. Jan 2016
    1. Ecocide

      Interesting idea. The only thing is that the science is not where we would like it to be. Most of the accusing will need to be done in retrospect. In that case, many will have lost culpability due to insufficient knowledge. I just wonder how this will hold up in a court of law for most practical cases. For some large-scale cases, I can see it working, as long as the effects are enormous.