23 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2018
    1. Clear goals for each learning event combined with a perfectly structured class was a clear indication of someone who took the profession of education seriously. This is what it meant to be expert teacher

      And in a climate where there is increasing pressure to show data-driven evidence of "student success," more institutions are turning to technology (more privatization) to monitor and report out on student "progress." :(

  2. Mar 2017
    1. I am an outsider as many of you are. I came to teaching late after fifteen years of farming and running a couple of businesses (taxes and chimney sweeping). I came to teaching through substitute teaching. WTF.

      Wandering Rhizomatic Chaotic Organic

    2. I have a lot of questions about whether any of the web-based tools we are using actually fit the mold of System A. I don’t often feel those spaces as convivial and natural. Behind the artifice of interface lay the reality of code. Is that structure humane? Is it open, sustainable, and regenerative? Does it feel good? Does the whole idea behind code generate System A or System B? I really don’t know.

      This is a really good key question..

    3. System A is all about integrity and health and the folk not as nodes in a machine, but as a growing, adapting, distributed and living whole. It is the difference between a neighborhood and a housing development.
  3. Jul 2016
    1. Set project work with explicit networking goals and a phil project as part of it. Mandate that students find off campus resources which they curate and present to class (either online, on a collab blog, or in class), reward students with facetime on their blog – good posts and comments get lecturer feedback,.

      Great ideas here.

  4. Apr 2016
  5. Mar 2016
  6. Jan 2016
    1. “participation architectures.”

      I much prefer this nomenclature especially since it allows me to add Christopher Alexander to the mix. He argued that there are machine systems and growing systems. Or perhaps we can think of the distinction as between engineered and rhizomatic? Or using James Scott's terms: legible v illegible.

  7. Sep 2015
  8. Jun 2015
  9. May 2015
    1. ‘how does it work?

      Applying it, not necessarily being faithful to the original

    2. riting rhizomatically; understanding texts as rhizomatic; and analyzing the rhizomatic linkages between texts and the talk of the research participants.

      3 types of rhizo thought

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    1. We are in desperate need of new concepts, Deleuzian or otherwise, in this new educational environment that privileges a single positivist research model with its transcendent rationality and objectivity and accompanying concepts such as randomization, replicability, generalizability, bias, and so forth—one that has marginalized subjugated knowledges and done material harm at all levels of education, and one that many educators have resisted with some success for the last fifty years

      In Freirean terms, we need an alternative to the banking model of learning

    2. Todd May (1996) explains that Deleuze’s ontology is ‘built upon the not-so-controversial idea that how we conceive the world is relevant to how we live in it.’

      this is relevant to rhizo learning. We see knowledge as something we construct, not something that we are given by experts.

    3. Now you might ask what this discussion of subjectivity in Deleuze has to do with education and science, and I would respond—everything, everything. All of education and science is grounded in certain theories of the subject; and if the subject changes, everything else must as well

      We need a concept of the subject that's not grounded in positivism

    4. Rather than asking what a concept means, you will find yourself Deleuzian Concepts for Education: The subject undone 285 © 2004 Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia asking, ‘Does it work? what new thoughts does it make possible to think? what new emotions does it make possible to feel? what new sensations and perceptions does it open in the body?’ (Massumi, 1992, p. 8). You soon give up worrying about what Deleuze might have intended and use him in your own work ‘to free life from where it’s trapped, to trace lines of flight’ (Deleuze, 1990/1995, p. 141) into a different wa y of being in the world

      The philosopher, says Deleuze, creates concepts.

    5. permission to give up the pretense of signifying and ‘making meaning’ in the old way

      Don't try to understand it (e.g.D&G), If it does not speak to you, try something else.

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    1. Now you might ask what this discussion of subjectivity in Deleuze has to do with education and science, and I would respond—everything, everything. All of education and science is grounded in certain theories of the subject; and if the subject changes, everything else must as well.

      D has a different view of the subject from trad education

    2. haecceity

      Thisness

    3. One form of resistance to the scientism produced by the old values of government functionaries involves accomplishing scholarship that critiques those values and introduces concepts that upset the established order. This essay participates in that resistance, illustrating how Deleuzian concepts keep the field of play open, becoming, rhizomatic, with science springing up everywhere, unrecognizable according to the old rules, coming and going in the middle, ‘where things pick up speed’ (Deleuze & Guattari, 1980/1987, p. 25).

      D&G as a response to scientism

    4. We are in desperate need of new concepts, Deleuzian or otherwise, in this new educational environment that privileges a single positivist research model with its transcendent rationality and objectivity and accompanying concepts such as randomization, replicability, generalizability, bias, and so forth—one that has marginalized subjugated knowledges and done material harm at all levels of education, and one that many educators have resisted with some success for the last fifty years.

      In Freirean terms, we need an alternative to the banking model of learning

    5. Deleuze's ontology is ‘built upon the not-so-controversial idea that how we conceive the world is relevant to how we live in it

      this is relevant to rhizo learning. We see knowledge as something we construct, not something that we are given by experts.

    1. The “dark” side of Rhizo14 related to many of the gaps in MOOC research that have been noted by other researchers and referenced in the review of literature. Rhizo14 participants for whom the experience was less than positive felt isolated. They felt unable to make meaningful connections despite in some cases being experienced “MOOCers.” One viewed the emphasis on community as an unnecessary pressure, which led to artificial effects, exclusion and limited learning. Another viewed the community as “ disjointed networks of pre-established subgroups. ” Another described the community as having a “ dark edge .” These participants felt that there was a lack of appropriate facilitation, and that there were inappropriate exhibitions of power and politics in the course. Some felt that the course was based on weak philosophical foundations and that the rhizome is an empty signifier. Some questioned the lack of content in the course and felt that it lacked depth and theoretical discussion. For these participants the rhizome is “ A pernicious, pervasive weed, rooted in a lot of dirt and “SH***””; “ . . .a ‘thug’ and can be very badly behaved”; “Part of one big family/ plant—joined at the hip”; “Clones of the “same damn plan t.” One respondent wrote “I knew before that the arborescent paradigm was a problem. The rhizome is a contrasting alternative, but I learned in the course that this alternative has a lot of connotations with ugly and weed-like characteristics which are not necessary for every complex or even chaotic network” (survey respondent)

      This is the relevant passage in this paper. Annotating it here: chrome-extension://bjfhmglciegochdpefhhlphglcehbmek/content/web/viewer.html?file=file%3A%2F%2F%2FC%3A%2FUsers%2Fsh131d%2FGoogle%2520Drive%2FMy%2520eBooks%2FRhizomes%2FMackness%2520and%2520Bell%25202015.pdf

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