7 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2016
    1. My experimentation with open pedagogy – and my attempts to guide students’ learning with/in and across open platforms – was a social endeavor that invited reciprocal networking.
  2. Apr 2016
    1. networked discovery of connections would be at the center of both the learning environment as designed by faculty and the learning environment as experienced by students

      Would love to hear Campbell or Kuh elaborate on this. Identifying "connections" as more important than identifying content/information? A new way for searching the Internet? Mining connections among content/people? Mining the connections I've made among content/people on the Internet?

  3. Jan 2016
    1. Offering students the possibility of experiential learning in personal, interactive, networked computing—in all its gloriously messy varieties—provides the richest opportunity yet for integrative thinking within and beyond "schooling."

      Yes, yes, yes. Networked learning IS experiential. I am always on the lookout for opportunities to facilitate those experiences - for my students and myself, and consider every embrace of glorious messiness a significant victory.

    2. Moreover, the experience of building and participating within a digitally mediated network of discovery is itself a form of experiential learning, indeed a kind of metaexperiential learning that vividly and concretely teaches the experience of networks themselves.

      With a wide open network, it also makes the world look smaller.

      This is a great essay by Gardner Campbell. I'd add more notes. But every time I try, I start sounding like a crazed revolutionary. Like this...

      Ask not how you can be a more suitable corporate drone. Ask how you can knock them down a few pegs.

      The computer is an unprecedented partner for the human mind. We've barely begun to tap its potential. Stop trying to turn it into television.

      Stop training kids to do what they're told. Teach them to teach themselves and one another.

    3. Go into your nearest college or university library. Ignore the computer stations and the digital affordances. Enter the stacks, and run your fingers along the spines of the books on the shelves. You're tracing nodes and connections. You're touching networked learning—slow-motion and erratic, to be sure, but solid and present and, truth to tell, thrilling.

      What a beautiful and evocative series of sentences!