504 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. if you have the cognitive abilities of something that is you know 10 to 100 times smarter than you trying to to outm smarten it it's just you know it's just not going to happen whatsoever so you've effectively lost at that point which means that 00:36:03 you're going to be able to overthrow the US government

      for - AI evolution - nightmare scenario - US govt may seize Open AI assets if it arrives at superintelligence

      AI evolution - projection - US govt may seize Open AI assets if it arrives at superintelligence - He makes a good point here - If Open AI, or Google achieve superintelligence that is many times more intelligent than any human, - the US government would be fearful that they could be overthrown or that the technology can be stolen and fall into the wrong hands

    2. be able to quick Master any domain write trillions lines of code and read every research paper in every scientific field ever written

      for - AI evolution - projections for capabilities by 2030

      AI evolution - projections for 2030 - AI will be able to do things we cannot even conceive of now because their cognitive capabilities are orders of magnitudes faster than our own - Write billions of lines of code - Absorb every scientific paper ever written and write new ones - Gain the equivalent of billions of human equivalent years of experience

    3. perhaps 100 million human researcher equivalents running day and night t

      for - stats - AI evolution - equivalent of 100 million human researchers working 24/7

      stats - AI evolution - equivalent of 100 million human researchers working 24/7 - By 2027, the industry's aim is to have tens of millions of GPU training clusters, running - millions of copies of automated AI researchers, or the equivalent of - 100 million human AI researchers working 24/7

    4. we are on course for AGI by 2027 and that these AI 00:19:25 systems will basically be able to automate basically all all cognitive jobs think any job that can be done remotely

      for - AI evolution - prediction - 2027 - all cognitive jobs can be done by AI

    5. suppose that GPT 4 training took 3 months in 2027 a leading AI lab will be able to train a GPT 4 00:18:19 level model in a minute

      for - stat - AI evolution - prediction 2027 - training time - 6 OOM decrease

      stat - AI evolution - prediction 2027 - training time - 6 OOM decrease - today it takes 3 months to train GPT 4 - in 2027, it will take 1 minute - That is, 131,400 minutes vs 1 minute, or - 6 OOM

    6. by 2027 rather than a chatbot you're going to have something that looks more like an agent and more like a coworker

      for - AI evolution - prediction - 2027 - AI agent will replace AI chatbot

    7. the inference efficiency improved by nearly three orders of magnitude or 1,000x in less than 2 years

      for - stats - AI evolution - Math benchmark - 2022 to 2024

      stats - AI evolution - Math benchmark - 2022 to 2024 - 50% increase in accuracy over 2 years - inference accuracy improved 1000x or 3 Orders Of Magnitude (OOM)

    8. there is essentially this Benchmark 00:09:58 called the math benchmark a set of difficult mathematic problems from a high school math competitions and when the Benchmark was released in 2021 gpt3 only got 5%

      for - stats - AI - evolution - Math benchmark

      stats - AI - evolution - Math benchmark - 2021 - GPT3 scored 5% - 2022 - scored 50% - 2024 - Gemini 1.5 Pro scored 90%

    1. Résumé de la vidéo [00:00:00][^1^][1] - [00:58:00][^2^][2] : La vidéo explore la complexité de l'adolescence, son évolution historique et biologique, et les différences entre les humains et les autres primates. L'orateur discute de la difficulté à définir l'adolescence, de son apparition récente dans les sociétés occidentales, et de l'importance de la néoténie chez les humains. Il aborde également la puberté chez les primates et les humains, soulignant les influences sociales et biologiques sur la maturité sexuelle.

      Points forts: + [00:00:00][^3^][3] Définition et complexité de l'adolescence * Difficulté à définir l'adolescence * Apparition récente dans les sociétés occidentales * Comparaison avec l'adolescence des primates + [00:03:40][^4^][4] Néoténie et développement humain * Importance de la néoténie chez les humains * Comparaison de la durée de gestation entre humains et grands primates * Influence de la néoténie sur la sociabilité humaine + [00:09:00][^5^][5] Stades de développement et terminologie * Différences terminologiques selon les langues * Stades de développement chez les humains et les primates * Définition scientifique de l'adolescence + [00:14:00][^6^][6] Puberté chez les primates * Maturité sexuelle et première reproduction chez les primates * Influence de la vie sociale sur la maturité sexuelle * Exemples de babouins et d'orang-outans + [00:19:30][^7^][7] Puberté et maturité sexuelle chez les humains * Processus et signaux biologiques de la puberté * Différences entre la puberté masculine et féminine * Influence socio-économique et environnementale sur la puberté

      Résumé de la vidéo [00:20:00][^1^][1] - [00:58:00][^2^][2] : La vidéo explore les complexités de l'adolescence et la maturité sexuelle chez les humains et les primates. Elle discute des théories sur la prématurité des bébés humains, les différences de développement entre les humains et les primates, et les facteurs influençant l'âge de la puberté. L'accent est mis sur l'importance de comprendre l'adolescence dans le contexte du développement humain global et des influences sociales et biologiques.

      Points forts : + [00:20:00][^3^][3] La prématurité des bébés humains * La durée de gestation humaine comparée à celle des primates * La néoténie et l'autonomie des nouveau-nés * L'impact de la station debout sur la durée de gestation + [00:33:00][^4^][4] Développement et adolescence chez les primates * Comparaison de la maturité sexuelle et de la première reproduction * Influence de la vie sociale sur l'adolescence des primates * La mobilité et les normes sociales chez les humains et les primates + [00:46:00][^5^][5] Maturité sexuelle et puberté chez les humains * L'âge de la puberté et les premières règles chez les filles * L'influence du niveau socio-économique et de l'alimentation * Les perturbateurs endocriniens et leur impact potentiel

    1. It was this apparent tension between science and the more traditional theological account of the origin of the human race that I attempted to resolve in an article which I published in 2011.16  Building on some work by Josephite priest Andrew Alexander,17 and applying the adage, “When faced with a contradiction, make a distinction,” I suggested this possible account of the origin of the human race: Evolution of a population of primates sufficiently large to carry the genetic diversity in question and with cognitive development sufficient to allow the infusion of a rational soul. Transformation of two of those primates into rational and, therefore, “fully human” beings by infusion of a created rational soul18 without destruction of their reproductive compatibility with the primate population out of which they were selected. At that point, there would have existed both “fully human” (i.e., rational) beings and “merely biologically human” beings.19 Interbreeding between the fully human beings and their merely biologically human neighbors. Creation of rational souls for each of the descendants of every fully human being. (Strictly, “for many of the descendants” is all that is necessary.)

      Adam and Eve Genesis

    1. McNeill does not specify whether he believed thatcontent or process was more important.

      I can't help of thinking about the debate on nature vs. nurture here. How might we extend it to the idea of content vs. process with respect to cultural anthropology.

      How does a culture vary based on the content they use and produce with respect to the process by which they transmit and use that same content?

      In colonialized cultures the process has been bastardized which then leads to changes in the content as well. Ultimately both switch and are changed from their original. How could a culture hold onto their past which makes it the culture that it was?

      There's some fun stuff going on at these junctures.

    2. Hutchins compiled those ideas in a few books, most nota-bly Higher Learning in America (1936).
  2. Jun 2024
    1. These two examples allude to a larger story — which is that a global convergence of change processes is driving us into an unavoidable culmination of planetary collapse.

      indeed 😬

  3. May 2024
    1. for - recombination of proteins in higher level proteins - from - youtube - Evolution 2 podcast interview - book - Understanding Living Systems - Denis Noble - Ray Noble

      from - youtube - Evolution 2 podcast interview - book - Understanding Living Systems - Denis Noble - Ray Noble - https://hyp.is/OttWABYFEe--gLNFyeNyTw/docdrop.org/video/oHZI1zZ_BhY/

    1. reproduction is not to produce the same it it's not about producing another Perry or another r or another Dennis 00:38:39 it's actually to produce another organism that is adapting and adaptable

      for - key insight - evolution - not producing the same, but different, more adaptive

      key insight - evolution - not producing the same, but different, more adaptive - The goal of evolution is not to replicate the same individual, but to create a different one that is BETTER ADAPTED to its environment - and towards this end, physiology is evolution, evolution is physiology (via epigenetics)

    2. for - Denis Noble - Ready Noble - evolutionary biology - critique of Richard Dawkins Selfish Gene theory - critique of gene centrism - book - Understanding Living Systems - human agency

      summary - In this informative interview, brothers Denis and Ray Noble discuss their new book - Understanding Living Systems, and - dispel the 70 year old narrative of Gene centrism and the selfish gene as determining the high level behaviour of living organisms

    3. we've created a very complex psychosocial World in which we live and we have to adapt to and it changes so rapidly it creates all sorts of problems for us

      for - quote - progress trap - speed of cultural evolution - Ray Noble

    1. this dualism probably isn’t right given today’s complexities

      for - progress trap - post comment - LinkedIn - Ralph Thurn article - progress trap - adjacency - progress trap - maladaptive - attention - focus of attention - cultural evolution - duality - dualism - dualistic

      adjacency - between - progress - progress trap - maladaptive - cultural evolution - attention - focus of attention - Exploring this statement further, it isn't just that it is our dualistic thinking applied here is a problem - but that it is the very nature of human analytic reasoning coupled with our innate ability to focus our attention which requires a deep unpacking - For to focus on an object of attention - is something we can only accomplish by defocusing on everything else - Indeed, it is the very act of attention on the one, that is inextricably accompanied by the act of inattention of the many - Our body, and that of many other organisms is evolutionarily designed - to focus our attention in our field of view on emergent phenomena that is salient to our survival - The nature of reductionist-type research - which is to say, most research - is that we continue applying this evolved adaptive behavior, even though cultural evolution (ie. progress) has accelerated exponentially to such an extent - that this same biologically evolved behavior has become maladaptive in the context of modernity

    1. l'évolution à l'œuvre aujourd'hui invite toutefois à repenser cette analyse car une autre troisième forme de gouvernement s'impose désormais c'est la répression elle n'est pas nouvelle elle est même très ancienne mais elle se 01:02:22 redéploie dans un dans le cadre d'un état sécuritaire dont Jacques chevali a montré qu'il redéfinit les contours de l'État de droit cependant plutôt qu'à une ces dimension qu'à une succession de 01:02:34 paradigme de gouvernement on assiste à une sédimentation société de discipline société de contrôle société de répression s'additionne et se 01:02:46 combine
    1. c'est au début du 20e siècle dans plusieurs pays ces mauvais traitements sont ainsi entrés dans la chaîne pénale et plus précisément dans le domaine judiciaire ils vont connaître trois redéfinitions 00:11:33 ultérieures qui sans les extraire du cadre de la loi les inscrivent également dans d'autres espaces celui de la médecine avec le syndrome de l'enfant battu d'abord celui de la santé publique 00:11:46 avec la caractérisation de la maltraitance infantile ensuite celui de la traumatologie psychologique avec la reconnaissance des abus sexuels
    2. c'est que indépendamment de la réalité statistique pénale concernant les mineurs la délinquence juvénile demeure un sujet qui suscite des réactions de 00:50:30 panique morale et excite la propension à la sévérité la tension entre protection et punition est dèslors un trait récurrent de la justice pénale des mineurs et dans le mouvement de balancier qui se manifeste au fil des 00:50:44 décennies le droit s'est nettement déplacé vers la punition
    3. l'exception dont les mineurs peuvent 00:59:59 théoriquement se prévaloir au regard de la loi du fait de leur vulnérabilité est donc elle même vulnérable à des politiques qui demandent plus de sévérité à l'encontre des délinquants ou des 01:00:11 étrangers
    4. dans le département des Alpes en 2017 1243 jeunes ce disant mineurs ont été évalués et 00:55:03 575 soit 46 % ont effectivement été reconnus tel mais 2 ans plus tard alors qu'il n'y avait pourtant plus que 621 dossiers examinés soit la moitié de 00:55:16 2017 seul 26 soit 4 % se sont vu attribuer le le statut protecteur cette politique drastique de de déminorisation instaurée par le Conseil départemental condamnait presque 00:55:30 systématiquement tous ces garçons à une vie de précarité d'érrance d'exposition à des risques bien documentés de violence d'addiction et de prostitution
    5. à partir du milieu des 00:45:24 années 1990 la tendance inverse avec un durcissement de la législation chaque fois qu'une majorité de droite revient au pouvoir et une correction seulement partielle lorsque c'est la gauche qui 00:45:35 gouverne ainsi en 1994 on institue la rétention judiciaire autrement dit la garde à vue pour les moins de 13 ans en 1996 on permet la comparution immédiate et la comparution devant le juge des 00:45:49 enfants sans instruction préalable en 2002 on crée les centres éducatifs fermés ainsi que les établissements pénitentiaires pour mineurs et on abaisse l'âge de la responsabilité pénale de 13 à 10 ans 00:46:01 autorisant des sanctions beaucoup plus tôt dans la vie le code de la justice pénale des mineurs rétablira en fait en 2021 la limite de 13 ans en 2007 les exception 00:46:13 permettant de ne pas appliquer l'excuse de minorité pour les les mineurs de plus de 16 ans sont élargies ces dispositions seront toutefois abreugé en 2014 la pleine excuse de minorité se trouvant 00:46:25 alors rétablie en 2007 encore on supprime l'atténuation de la peine pour les mineurs de 16 ans en cas deuxèe récidif s'il commett un délit avec violence ou agression sexuelle en 00:46:38 2011 les tribunaux correctionnels pour mineurs sont créés pour juger les délits punis de plus de 3 ans d'emprisonnement en récidive par des adolescents de plus de 16 ans ils seront 00:46:50 cependant supprimé en 2016 en 2019 on permet d'appliquer au mineurs de plus de 13 la détention à domicile sous surveillance électronique progressivement ainsi avec 00:47:02 ces balancements que je vous ai indiqué le législateur érode le principe de protection de l'ordonnance de 1945 restreint les effets de la 00:47:14 présomption de non discernement et de l'excuse de minorité multiplie les lieux d'enfermement et les possibilités de peine correspondantes et rapproche la justice pénale des mineurs de la justice 00:47:27 pénale des adultes et vous aurez certainement remarqué que c'est un débat qui aujourd'hui est à nouveau sur la table
  4. Apr 2024
    1. https://web.archive.org/web/20240429112449/https://www.pnas.org/doi/10.1073/pnas.2310223120 paper from #2023/10/16

      so what do we have: heuristics -> emergence -> complexity -> system evolution

      static persistence, dynamic persistence, novetly generation. Function is a selective pressure “law of increasing functional information” vgl [[Informatiewaarde ligt in verrassing surprisal 20210124072501]]. How does this work vis-a-vis entropy laws vgl [[Definitie van leven 20190715121243]] as entities that reduce entropy in their environment.

      Life as bootstrapping to another level of complexity

      Paper in Zotero

    1. si je peux me permettre juste de revenir sur cette question de 00:08:58 rajeunissement ce qui est sûr c'est que il est plus visible ce rajeunissement puisque avant on ne faisait pas d'enquête dans l'école primaire donc ces chiffres sont tout nouveau en fait donc ça donne l'impression qu'il y a énormément de violence
    2. en fait il y a une espèce d'évolution de la violence au 00:09:36 cours de la vie des adolescents
  5. Mar 2024
    1. for - kinship - history of human kinship - evolution - extended to nuclear family

      paper details - title: Family Institution and Modernization: A Sociological Perspective - author: Ilori Oladapo Mayowa - date: 2019

      summary - A paper that describes the evolution of human kinship from extended familly to nuclear family in modernity.

    1. quelque chose s'est modifié dans le comportement à l'égard du couple du fait de euh notamment de ce facteur de qu'est-ce que c'est que conquérir un niveau 01:39:24 d'éducation supérieur pour les femmes c'est ça le c'est ça le l'argument donc euh le les ces données récentes qui figurent ici pour notamment pour 2010 01:39:38 finissent par contredire la fameuse thèse du moy de famille sur à peu près tous les points nous découvrons que ce que les citoyens considèrent comme le nombre idéal d'enfants n'a pas du tout changé depuis les décennies 01:39:51 d'après-gerre et dans un nombre non négligeable de pays et gstaing nersen parle beaucoup de la Scandinavie la famille est clairement en train de se rétablir
  6. Feb 2024
    1. quand on est en lien avec l'école c'est que quand ils sont en maternelle ça pose pas trop de problèmes 00:34:12 ces troubles du comportement en maternelle trouble du comportement c'est quand il rentre en primaire que ça commence à être un peu compliqué avec des difficultés scolaires et des interactions sociales avec les autres qui sont durs si on n'a rien fait à ce 00:34:25 moment-là et qu'on n'est pas qu'on n'est pas intervenu quand il rentre au niveau du niveau du collège il commence à avoir les conduitaristes la baisse des cimes de même et surtout c'est dans la deuxième partie au moment du gymnase du 00:34:37 lycée qui ont besoin de trouver des stratégies pour s'apaiser et les stratégies malheureusement c'est les addictions et en particulier l'addiction aux écrans c'est à dire que ces enfants là ils sont particulièrement à risque d'addiction
    1. Dubbed “litigation terrorism” by Joseph Stiglitz, the Nobel prize-winning economist. ISDS is a corporate tribunal system

      for - litigation terrorism - ISDS - corporate tribunal system - Michael Levin - multi-scale competency architecture - example - adjacency - evolutionary biology - corporate law - climate crisis

      adjacency - between - corporate law - climate crisis - evolutionary biology - cultural evolution - adjacency statement - Biologist Michael Levin's multi-scale competency architecture of evolutionary biology seems to apply here - in the field of corporate law - Corporations can be viewed as one level of a social superorganism in a cultural evolution process - Governments can be viewed similiarly, but at a higher level - The ISDS is being weaponized by the same corporations destroying the global environment to combat the enactment of government laws that pose a threat to their livelihood - Hence, the ISDS has been reconfigured to protect the destroyers of the environment so that they can avoid dealing with their unacceptable externalizations - The individual existing at the lower level of the multi-scale competency architecture(the corporation) is battling to survive against the wishes of the higher level individual (the government) in the same multi-scale competency architecture

    1. The experiences of the atomic scientists clearly show the need to takepersonal responsibility, the danger that things will move too fast, andthe way in which a process can take on a life of its own. We can, as theydid, create insurmountable problems in almost no time flat. We mustdo more thinking up front if we are not to be similarly surprised andshocked by the consequences of our inventions.

      Bill Joy's mention that insurmountable problems can "take on a life of [their] own" is a spectacular reason for having a solid definition of what "life" is, so that we might have better means of subverting it in specific and potentially catastrophic situations.

  7. Jan 2024
    1. dreaming can be seen as the "default" position for the activated brain

      for - dream theory - dreaming as default state of brain

      • Dreaming can be seen as the "default" position for the activated brain
      • when it is not forced to focus on
        • physical and
        • social reality by
          • (1) external stimuli and
          • (2) the self system that reminds us of
            • who we are,
            • where we are, and
            • what the tasks are
          • that face us.

      Question - I wonder what evolutionary advantage dreaming would bestow to the first dreaming organisms? - why would a brain evolve to have a default behaviour with no outside connection? - Survival is dependent on processing outside information. There seems to be a contradiction here - I wonder what opinion Michael Levin would have on this theory?

    1. for - multi scale competency architecture - Michael Levin - evolutionary biology - rapid whole system change - adjacency - multi scale competency architecture - rapid whole system change - stop reset go - Deep Humanity - Indyweb - Indranet - major evolutionary transition in individuality - MET - superorganism - cumulative cultural evolution of individuality

      adjacency - between - multi scale competency architecture - rapid whole system change - progress trap - stop reset go - Deep Humanity - Indyweb - Indranet - major evolutionary transition in individuality - MET - superorganism - cumulative cultural evolution of individuality - adjacency statement - The idea of multi scale competency architecture can be extended to apply to the cultural level. - in the context of humanity's current existential poly /meta/ perma crisis, - rapid whole system change - (a cultural behavioural paradigm shift) - is required within a few short years - to avoid the worst impacts of - catastrophic, - anthropogenic - climate change, which is entangled with a host of other earth system boundary violations including - biodiversity loss - fresh water scarcity - - the driver of evolution through major evolutionary transitions in individuality has given rise to the level of cultural superorganisms that include all previous levels - progress and its intended consequences of progress traps play a major role in determining the future evolutionary trajectory of our and many other species - our species is faced with a few choice permutations in this regard: - individually regulate behaviour aligned with a future within earth system boundaries - collectively regulate behaviour aligned with a future within earth system boundaries - pursue sluggish green growth / carbon transition that is effectively tinkering at the margins of rapid whole system change - BAU - currently, there doesn't appear to be any feasible permutation of any of the above choices - There is insufficient worldview alignment to create the unity at scale for report whole system change - individual incumbent state and corporate actors still cling too tightly to the old, destructive regime, - creating friction that keeps the actual rate of change below the required - Stop Reset Go, couched within the Deep Humanity praxis and operationalized through the Indyweb / Indranet individual / collective open learning system provides a multi-dimensional tool for a deep educational paradigm shift that can accelerate both individual and collective upregulation of system change

    1. It seems to me farmore likely that a robotic existence would not be like a human one inany sense that we understand, that the robots would in no sense be ourchildren, that on this path our humanity may well be lost.

      Here would be a good place to give a solid definition of humanity? What makes it special beyond the "self"?

      We are genetically very closely related to great apes and chimpanzees and less closely to dogs, cats, and even rats. Do we miss our dogicity? Or ratanity?

      What if the robot/human mix is somehow even more interesting and transcendent than humanity? His negativity doesn't leave any space for this possible eventuality.

    2. in hishistory of such ideas, Darwin Among the Machines, George Dysonwarns: “In the game of life and evolution there are three players at thetable: human beings, nature, and machines. I am firmly on the side ofnature. But nature, I suspect, is on the side of the machines.”
    3. the changes would come gradually, and that we would get used to them

      gradual change is always the way with evolution...

    4. The systems involvedare complex, involving interaction among and feedback between manyparts. Any changes to such a system will cascade in ways that are diffi-cult to predict; this is especially true when human actions are involved.

      Perhaps the evolution to solve AI-resistance (mentioned in https://hypothes.is/a/-JjZurr3Ee6EtG8G_Sbt8Q) won't be done at the level of the individual human genome, but will be done at the human society level genome.

      Political groups of people have an internal memetic genome which can evolve and change over time much more quickly than the individual human's genes would work.

    5. Our overuse of antibiotics has led to what may be thebiggest such problem so far: the emergence of antibiotic-resistant andmuch more dangerous bacteria. Similar things happened when attemptsto eliminate malarial mosquitoes using DDT caused them to acquireDDT resistance; malarial parasites likewise acquired multi-drug-resistant genes.

      Just as mosquitoes can "acquire" (evolve) DDT resistance or bacteria might evolve antiobiotic-resistance, might not humans evolve AI resistance? How fast might we do this? On what timeline? Will the pressure be slowly built up over time, or will the onset be so quick that extinction is the only outcome?

    1. The sectors become the vehicle to carry the problem-solving governance
      • for: adjacency - problem solving - governance sectors - cultural evolution

      • adjacency between

        • governance sectors
        • problem solving
        • cultural evolution
      • adjacency statement
        • Governance sectors culturally evolved to reflect different problem-solving approaches
  8. Dec 2023
    1. without a World En-cyclopedia to hold men's minds togetherin something like a common interpreta-tion of reality there is no hope whateverof anything but an accidental and transi-tory alleviation to any of our world trou-bles. As mankind is so it will remainuntil it pulls its mind together. And if itdoes not pull its mind together then I donot see how it can help but decline.Never was a living species more peril-ously poised than ours at the presenttime. If it does not take thoughtto endits present mental indecisiveness catastro-phe lies ahead. Our species may yet endits strange eventful history as just the last,the cleverest, of the great apes. Thegreat ape that was clever-but not cleverenough. It could escape from mostthings but not from its own mental con-fusion.
    2. They don't want their intimate convic-tions turned over and examined, and itis unfortunate that the emphasis put

      upon minor differences by men of science and belief in their strenuous search for the completest truth and the exactest expression sometimes gives color to this sort of misunderstanding.

      This emphasis on minor differences is exactly what many anti-science critics have done. See examples with respect to evolution and climate science denial.

    1. A last preliminary word on method: what follows is not to be read as stylistic description, as the account of one cultural style or movement among others. I have rather meant to offer a periodizing hypothesis, and that at a moment in which the very conception of historical periodization has come to seem most problematical indeed. I have argued elsewhere that all isolated or discrete cultural analysis always involves a buried or repressed theory of historical periodization; in any case, the conception of the ‘genealogy’ largely lays to rest traditional theoretical worries about so-called linear history, theories of ‘stages’, and teleological historiography. In the present context, however, lengthier theoretical discussion of such (very real) issues can perhaps be replaced by a few substantive remarks.

      Another beautifully put paragraph.

      Jameson is dealing with the objections, that we encounter too, about creating "periods" (aka stages or phases or paradigms in our onto-social contexts). Because, of course, in any study of cultural phenomena and cultural evolution there are no completely sharp breaks. It is always, at least when zoomed in, evolution rather than revolution.

      But that misses the point. Good theoretical (e.g. dynamical systems theory) and empirical reasons suggest that we do have more discrete changes.

      His second point is that this genealogical not linear. - it is branching and refolding Again of course, though a simplified genealogy is a linear one (e.g. the kings/queens of England).

    1. we are certainly special I mean 00:02:57 no other animal rich the moon or know how to build atom bombs so we are definitely quite different from chimpanzees and elephants and and all the rest of the animals but we are still 00:03:09 animals you know many of our most basic emotions much of our society is still run on Stone Age code
      • for: stone age code, similar to - Ronald Wright - computer metaphor, evolutionary psychology - examples, evolutionary paradox of modernity, evolution - last mile link, major evolutionary transition - full spectrum in modern humans, example - MET - full spectrum embedded in modern humans

      • comment

      • insights

        • evolutionary paradox of modernity
          • modern humans , like all the living species we share the world with, are the last mile link of the evolution of life we've made it to the present, so all species of the present are, in an evolutionary sense, winners of their respective evolutionary game
          • this means that all our present behaviors contain the full spectrum of the evolutionary history of 4 billion years of life
          • the modern human embodies all major evolutionary transitions of the past
          • so our behavior, at all levels of our being is a complex and heterogenous mixture of evolutionary adaptations from different time periods of the 4 billion years that life has taken to evolve.
          • Some behaviors may have originated billions of years ago, and others hundred thousand years ago.
      • Examples: humans embody full spectrum of METs in our evolutionary past

        • fight and flight response
          • early hominids on African Savannah hundreds of thousands to millions of years ago when hominids were predated upon by wild predators
        • cancer
          • normative intercell communication breaks down and reverts to individual cell behavior from billions of years ago
            • see Michael Levin's research on how to make metastatic cancer cells return to normative collective, cooperative behavior
        • children afraid to sleep in the dark
          • evolutionary adaptation against dangerous animals that might have hid in the dark - dangerous insiects, snakes, etc, which in the past may have resulted in human fatalities
        • obesity
          • hunter gatherer hominid attraction to rich sources of fruit. Eating as much of it as we can and maybe harvesting as much as we can and carrying that with us.
            • like squirrels storing away for the winter.
  9. Nov 2023
    1. Chapter 39 of Zoonomia, “On Generation,” presents Erasmus’ ideas on competition, extinction, and how “different fibrils or molecules are detached from…the parent…to form” the child. The Temple of Nature goes even farther, declaring “all vegetables and animals now existing were originally derived from the smallest microscopic ones, formed by spontaneous vitality” in ancient oceans.

      Interesting to contemplate the evolution of the idea of evolution through the Darwin family.

      Charles would obviously have read his grandfather's book, but it also bears noting that he also had access to his grandfather's commonplace book (and likely his other papers).

      See also: https://hypothes.is/a/FmVxQuqJEey33Uu0UTcMlg

    1. let's assume that the price of oil uh is at least at the uh 75 range which keeps us out of trouble Keith is at least floating in Alberta maybe even 80 bucks 01:00:56 a barrel maybe even 85 so that we've got some extra money so uh we're going to appoint you and you get to look around for a female and uh 01:01:10 the two of you have to then look around for uh people who are uh indigenous male and female and the four of you are going to be a group and we're going to give you 01:01:22 um uh uh a hundred billion dollars to spend over 10 years which means that you've got uh 10 billion 100 million no we're going to do more 01:01:37 we're going to give you a billion dollars so you've got a hundred million a year and you're going to be able to give it away in 10 million dollar tranches
      • for: interesting idea - project to shift consciousness in Alberta

      • comment

      • interesting idea: project to shift consciousness in Alberta
        • When there is a surplus use it to spend a billion dollars over the next 10 years, 100 million each year given away in 10 million dollar tranches
        • communities of approx. 15,000 people can apply for the 10 million dollar grant to raise consciousness and understand the modernity frame they currently unconsciously live within
        • in order to change the system, you have to first be aware of it and how that system is in you
        • This is an evolutionary experiment because nobody has tried to change a complex system like this before
    1. here is the human 00:50:39 journey the big arrows indicate the way that it in fact developed in history the small errors indicate that of the seven point seven billion of us on the planet people are moving in every direction 00:50:52 from each of those phases and some in each of those phases want to hang on to those phases are not move that's what those great black circles are the little black circles our people who want to 00:51:04 just hang on to what they've got and not move but others are on the move and what's more they're on the move in every possible direction
      • for: cultural evolution - diverse movements, cultural transition - diverse movements

      • summary

        • Bill Reese and Rubin Nelson believe that the dynamic / relational quadrant of indigenous culture is the most viable futures
    2. we've got to leave the bottom left-hand corner and that only gives you three other spaces to go to and I've already noted that one of those spaces may be a place that has a certain utility short-run 00:50:27 but don't try to build your culture there because you can't do it it's a place that you want to be in for a while but then you wanna leave so it really only gives you two places
      • for: major cultural paradigms, modernity - leaving, cultural transition, cultural evolution, MET, Major Evolutionary Transition, kiey insight - 4 major cultural paradigms

      • comment

      • key insight: 4 major cultural paradigms

        • This matrix doesn't quite capture what Ruben is proposing because he later talks about neo-indigenous, which means taking elements of modernity but within an overall indigenous framework, so a hybrid
        • It would be worth exploring implications for an evolutionary framework of Major Evolutionary Transitions (MET)
    1. Aussi, l'éditorialisation décrit la façon dont nos traditions culturelles influencent notre manière de structurer les contenus

      terme en lien avec l'évolution de notre culture

    2. Il est impossible de comprendre la structure hypertextuelle dans sa manifestation technologique particulière qu'est l'html, sans prendre en considération l'histoire culturelle des classifications non linéaires.

      Ce n'est donc pas une technologie nouvelle et issue du numérique, mais une évolution d'un système ou d'une pratique antérieure au numérique.

    1. Otherwise we’d be second-guessing ourselves at every moment: Who is deciding to buy a house or have a child? FV: That’s right. Every decision would be suspect. So evolution has designed you so that you just want to hurry on with your solidified self. That is what the sense of being a separate organism is all about.
      • for: self awareness of no-self, adjacency - evolution - no-self - Fransisco Verella, quote - Fransisco Verella, quote - evolution - solidified self, question - awakening to no-self

      • quote: Fransisco Verella

        • Evolution has designed you so that you just want to hurry on with your solidified self. They is what the sense of being a separate organism is about.
      • date: 1999

      • comment

        • Verella claims evolution has designed us to have no self awareness of no-self, the origins of the self.
        • even this phrase seems like an oxymoron 'self awareness of no-self!'
      • question
        • how would a less complex, more primitive life form even have self awareness? What does that mean biologically? At that most rudimentary level, I suppose it would mean sensory feedback signals,
      • question
        • Does this imply that (emotionally or affectively) awakening to your origins of self leads to second guessing ourselves as well? From observation of the behaviour of awakened individuals, this does not seem to be the case. Rather, authentically awakens individuals appear to be associated with much higher levels of wisdom and compassion, which would seem to confer evolutionary fitness
    2. : Why do you think it is so hard for people to awaken to the true nature of things, even after being told of scientific research or after having a personal experience of no-self? FV: My hypothesis is that evolution has shaped human beings to disregard the basic sources of our being. We were built to forget how we were put together.
      • for: evolution - forgetting our non-self nature, adjacency - evolution - non-self - Fransisco Verella, adjacency - evolution - no-self - Fransisco Verella

      • adjacency between

        • evolution
        • non-self
        • Francisco Verella
      • adjacency statement
        • Verella makes the interesting claim that evolution designer is to be blind to our lack of self
        • in fact, major evolutionary transitions in individuality embed the creation of a new higher order individual at each major stage of transition.
        • More fundamentally, major evolutionary transitions to individuals at each level need to define a biological self through a new physiological boundary between what constitutes a new unitary individual "self" (our inner world) and the rest of the environment ( our new outer world)
        • It will be interesting to see how Verella's claim reconcile with that
    3. In some sense, a heightened degree of self-awareness is antievolutionary.
      • for: quote - Fransisco Verella, quote - evolution - no-self

      • quote: Fransisco Verella

        • In some sense, a heightened degree of self-awareness is anti evolutionary
      • date: 1999
    1. I'm tempted to say you can look at uh broadscale social organization uh or like Network Dynamics as an even larger portion of that light 00:32:43 cone but it doesn't seem to have the same continuity well I don't you mean uh it doesn't uh like first person continuity like it doesn't like you think it doesn't it isn't like anything to be 00:32:55 that social AG agent right and and we we both are I think sympathetic to pan psychism so saying even if we only have conscious access to what it's like to be 00:33:08 us at this higher level like it's there's it's possible that there's something that it's like to be a cell but I'm not sure it's possible that there's something that there's something it's like to be say a country
      • for: social superorganism - vs human multicellular being, social superorganism, Homni, major evolutionary transition, MET, MET in Individuality, Indyweb, Indranet, Indyweb/Indranet, CCE cumulative cultural evolution, symmathesy, Gyuri Lajos, individual/collective gestalt, interwingled sensemaking, Deep Humanity, DH, meta crisis, meaning crisis, polycrisis

      • comment

        • True, there is no physical cohesion that binds human beings together into a larger organism, but there is another dimension - informational cohesion.
        • This informational cohesion expresses itself in cumulative cultural evolution. Even this very discussion they are having is an example of that
        • The social superorganism is therefore composed of an informational body and not a physical one and one can think of its major mentations as collective, consensual ideas such as popular memes, movements, governmental or business actions and policies
        • I slept on this and this morning, realized how salient Adam's question was to my own work
          • The comments here build and expand upon what I thought yesterday (my original annotations)
          • The main connections to my own sense-making work are:
            • Within our specific human species, the deep entanglement between self and other (the terminology that our Deep Humanity praxis terms the "individual / collective gestalt")
            • The Deep Humanity / SRG claim that the concurrent meaning / meta / poly crisis may be an evolutionary test foreshadowing the next possible Major Evolutionary Transition in Individuality.<br /> - https://jonudell.info/h/facet/?max=100&expanded=true&user=stopresetgo&exactTagSearch=true&any=MET+in+Individuality
              • As Adam notes, collective consciousness may be more a metaphorical rather than a literal so a social superorganism, (one reference refers to it as Homni
              • may be metaphorical only as this higher order individual lacks the physical signaling system to create a biological coherence that, for instance, an animal body possesses.
              • Nevertheless, the informational connections do exist that bind individual humans together and it is not trivial.
              • Indeed, this is exactly what has catapulted our species into modernity where our cumulative cultural evolution (CCE) has defined the concurrent successes and failures of our species. Modernity's meaning / meta / polycrisis and progress traps are a direct result of CCE.
              • Humanity's intentions and its consequences, both intended and unintended are what has come to shape the entire trajectory of the biosphere. So the impacts of human CCE are not trivial at all. Indeed, a paper has been written proposing that human information systems could be the next Major System Transition (MST) that could lead to another future MET that melds biotic and abiotic
              • This circles back to Adam's question and what has just emerged for me is this question:
                • Is it possible that we could evolve in some kind of hybrid direction where we are biologically still separate individuals BUT deeply intertwingled informationally through CCE and something like the theoretical Indyweb/Indranet which is an explicit articulation of our theoretical informational connectivity?
                • In other words, could "collective consciousness be explicitly defined in terms of an explicit, externalized information system reflecting intertwingled individual/collective learning?
            • The Indyweb / Indranet informational laminin protein / connective tissue that informationally binds individuals to others in an explicit, externalized means of connecting the individual informational nodes of the social superorganism, giving it "collective consciousness" (whereas prior to Indyweb / Indranet, this informational laminin/connective tissue was not systematically developed so all informational connection, for example of the existing internet, is incomplete and adhoc)
            • The major trajectory paths that global or localized cultural populations take can become an indication of the behavior of collective consciousness.
              • Voting, both formal and informal is an expression of consensus leading to consensual behavior and the consensual behavior could be a reflection of Homni's collective consciousness
      • insight

        • While socially annotating this video, a few insights occurred after last night's sleep:
          • Hypothes.is lacks timebound sequence granularity. Indyweb / Indranet has this feature built in and we need it for social annotation. Why? All the information within this particular annotation cannot be machine sorted into a time series. As the social annotator, I actually have to point out which information came first, second, etc. This entire comment, for instance was written AFTER the original very short annotation. Extra tags were updated to reflect the large comment.
          • I gained a new realization of the relationship and intertwingularity of individual / collective learning while writing and reflecting on this social annotation. I think it's because of Adam's question that really revolves around MET of Individuality and the 3 conversant's questioning of the fluid and fuzzy boundary between "self" and "other"
            • Namely, within Indyweb / Indranet there are two learning pillars that make up the entirety of external sensemaking:
              • the first is social annotation of the work of others
              • the second is our own synthesis of what we learned from others (ie. our social annotations)
            • It is the integration of these two pillars that is the sum of our sensemaking parts. Social annotations allow us to sample the edge of the sensemaking work of others. After all, when we ingest one specific information source of others, it is only one of possibly many. Social annotations reflect how our whole interacts with their part. However, we may then integrate that peripheral information of the other more deeply into our own sensemaking work, and that's where we must have our own central synthesizing Indyweb / Indranet space to do that work.
            • It is this interplay between different poles that constitute CCE and symmathesy, mutual learning.
            • adjacency between
              • Indyweb / Indranet name space
              • Indranet
              • automatic vs manual references / citations
            • adjacency statement
              • Oh man, it's so painful to have to insert all these references and citations when Indranet is designed to do all this! A valuable new meme just emerged to express this:
                • Pain between the existing present situation and the imagined future of the same si the fuel that drives innovation.
      • quote: Gien

        • Pain between an existing present situation and an imagined, improved future is the fuel that drives innovation.
      • date: 2023, Nov 8
  10. Oct 2023
    1. New words, and new senses and uses of words, are not sanctioned or rejected by the authority of any single body: they arise through regular use and, once established, are recorded in dictionaries and grammars.
    1. In both cases, it's up to us now to discipline ourselves to avoid the fats in junk food, and the breaking news and dopamine thrill-ride of social media.

      A nice encapsulation of evolutionary challenges that humans are facing.

    1. rattachement des services de la Jeunesse et des Sports sous un ministère unique nous conduit aujourd'hui à travailler avec nos collègues qui se préoccupent de 00:43:10 l'accueil des mineurs donc nous pourrions tout à fait aujourd'hui avoir des appels de ce type et donc j'ai associé la sdjes là voilà la sdjs la concert technique de 00:43:23 l'inspecteur d'académie dans le champ jeunesse engagement sport vous voyez par exemple pendant un séjour SNU pour être tout à fait avoir cette question
    1. you can't see the big picture you can't see what's going on until everything has sort of already happened and then you can piece it together so that is one of 00:08:13 the tantalizing and engaging as well points about natural history about Evolution it's largely a reconstructive sort of science it's not a benchtop science for the most part you have to sort of reconstruct things and you have 00:08:25 to look to living animals to get an idea of what was going on in the past so you can link clues about the past that you have a very limited record to the morphology the physiology the behavior of living animals
      • for: evolution - a reconstructive science

      • insight

        • evolution is a reconstructive science
          • one has to look at living species, combine with whatever meager fossil physical evidence to reconstruct a picture of life forms in the past
    2. I'm going to kind of give you my 00:04:56 take on what I believe to have been the natural history of or what I believe is the natural history of awareness a sort of a sequence of innovations that occurred that facilitated the appearance 00:05:09 of consciousness on Earth
      • for: key claim, key claim - natural history of awareness leading evolution of consciousness, natural history - awareness leading to consciousnessn
    3. Cambrian explosion
      • for: Cambrian explosion, 2D to 3D organisms

      • insight

        • During the Cambrian explosion, there was a major evolutionary transition from bottom dwellers that lived on the flat bottom of the ocean to organisms evolved to explore the entire 3D water column. Some of the evolutionary adaptations that made this possible were
          • eyes that supported vision and perception of distance
          • representation of space and time
    4. Dr Dave David Edelman
      • for: Dr. David Edelman, octopus - awareness, evolution of awareness
    1. Hans Bethe, who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1967, remarked: “I have sometimes wondered whether a brain like von Neumann’s does not indicate a species superior to that of man.”
    1. If you want the easy way out (which looks like the way majority usage is going anyway), you can probably get away with using dependency all the time.
  11. Sep 2023
    1. Spiral Dynamics (SD) is a model of the evolutionary development of individuals, organizations, and societies. It was initially developed by Don Edward Beck and Christopher Cowan based on the emergent cyclical theory of Clare W. Graves, combined with memetics as proposed by Richard Dawkins and further developed by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spiral_Dynamics

      related to ideas I've had with respect to Werner R. Loewenstein?

    1. Let us at this point simply note that the Māra drive seems reducible to a wish to maintain the status quo (“sentient beings suffer, and they shall keep doing so!”) whereas the Bodhisattva is committed to infinite transformation.
      • comment
        • this is definitely seeing evolution through a Buddhist lens!
        • mara - maintain status quo
        • bodhisattva - infinite transformation
    1. we are fundamentally a cultural species. 00:09:51 Culture is our life support system. Our cumulative culture allows us to cushion ourselves against the harsh realities of the environment and to reshape the environment.
      • for: cultural evolution, cultural evolution - Bruce Hood, cumulative cultural evolution, CCE, gene-culture coevolution

      • paraphrase

        • Our evolving technology allowed us to expand into new territories and manipulate the environment in ways that gave us an edge.
        • Places like this remind me about how harsh nature can be.
        • We're so used to living in air conditioning, and having the comfort of the modern world, but when you go out into nature and experience it first hand, you're reminded very powerfully about how weak we are as an animal.
        • And this is because we are fundamentally a cultural species.
        • Culture is our life support system.
        • Our cumulative culture allows us to
          • cushion ourselves against the harsh realities of the environment and to
          • reshape the environment.
    1. synthetic bioengineering provides a really astronomically large option space for new bodies and new minds that don't have 00:04:28 standard evolutionary backstories
      • for: cultural evolution, cumulative cultural evolution, CCE, bioengineering, novel life form, culturally evolved life, bioethics, progress trap, progress trap - bioengineering, progress trap - genetic engineering
      • comment
        • cultural evolution, which itself emerges from biological evolution is acting upon itself to create new life forms that have no evolutionary backstory
        • this is tantamount to playing God
        • progress traps often emerge out of the large speed mismatch between cultural and biological/genetic evolution.
        • Nowhere is this more profound than in bioengineering of new forms of life with no evolutionary history
        • This presents profound ethical challenges
    1. Winnicott also had a strikingly different notion of the agent of psychological change.
      • for: Winnicott, Freud, comparison, comparison - Winnicott - Freud, transitional space, Bardo, evolution
      • paraphrase
      • comparison: Winnicott, Freud

        • Winnicott had a strikingly different notion of the agent of psychological change than Freud.

          • Winnicott
            • His psychotherapeutic model was developmental, one that sees.
              • the therapeutic relationship and
              • the original parent-child relationship(s)
            • as analogous.
            • Thus, just as he saw the development of the child as being fundamentally tied
              • to the immediate, visceral relationship with the mother in the experiential unit.
          • psychotherapeutic change was all about the relationship between - client and - therapist.

            • This was later conceptualised as a shift
              • from a ‘one-person’ psychology
              • to a ‘two-person’ psychology.
          • Freud

            • Freud was focused on rational interventions from the outside
            • This gave way in Winnicott to a co-creative journey occurring in the area in between,
          • which was much more about who one was and what one did, than what one thought or said.
            • In his book Playing and Reality (1971),
          • Winnicott called the location of this experience ‘transitional space’,
            • alluding to its dynamic, insubstantial quality,
            • but also to its nature as a place of becoming.
          • It is, he said, a place we both
            • create and that
            • creates us
          • a paradox that we must accept and not try to resolve
          • where unformulated possibility replaces
            • fixed identities, and
            • experience is necessarily co-constructed.
      • comment

        • Winnicott's transitional space is like
          • the Tibetan concept of the Bardo
          • the biological concept of evolution
    1. interrelationality, not in arrangement.
      • for: evolution
      • question
        • Does life not require both?
        • Regardless, Indra's net of jewels is an appropriate metaphor
  12. Aug 2023
    1. I should like to add that specialization, instead of makingthe Great Conversation irrelevant, makes it more pertinentthan ever. Specialization makes it harder to carry on anykind of conversation; but this calls for greater effort, not theabandonment of the attempt.

      The dramatic increase in economic specialization of humanity driven by the Industrial Revolution has many benefits to societies, but it also has detrimental effects when the core knowledge and shared base of the society is lost.

      Certainly individuals have a greater reliance on specialists for future outcomes (think about the specialization of areas like climate science which can have destructive outcomes on all of humanity or public health outcomes with respect to vaccines and specialized health care delivery), but they also need to have a common base of knowledge/culture and the ability to think critically for themselves to be able to effect necessary changes, particularly when the pace of those changes is more rapid than humans have generally been evolved to accept them.

    1. Quoting the academics Francis-Noël Thomas and Mark Turner, Pinker suggests approaching writing as if you were pointing something in the environment out to another person – something that she would notice for herself, if only she knew where to look. Imagine directing someone's gaze across a valley, to a specific house on the other side. "You should pretend," writes Pinker, "that you, the writer, see something in the world that's interesting, and that you're directing the attention of your reader to that thing." He calls this the "joint attention" strategy.

      Good writing is pointing out the interesting things you see to others. It's pre-literate, and even pre-oral.

    1. About ten years ago, a massive breakthrough happened in genomic research technology. A method appeared which is called NGS, next generation sequencing, and this method significantly cuts time and costs of any genomic research. For example, have you ever heard about the Human Genome Project? It was quite a popular topic for science fiction some time ago. 00:03:10 This project launched in 1990 with the goal to decrypt all genomic information in a human organism. At that time, with the technology of the time, it took ten years and three billion dollars to reach the goals of this project. With NGS, all of that can be done in just one day at the cost of 15,000 dollars.
      • for: progress trap, cumulative cultural evolution, gene-culture co-evolution, speed of cultural evolution, human genome project
      • paraphrase
        • the human genome project took 10 years and cost 3 billion dollars
        • with NGS technology, 10 years later, the same job takes 1 day and costs $15,000 dollars
    1. Periods of normal science are interrupted when anomalies between observations and the expectations suggested by the paradigm begin to demonstrate the paradigm’s weakness.

      Lego theory of science.

      Individual bricks are facts which can be assembled in a variety of ways, each of which is a particular paradigm. Ultimately, the optimal structure is one which dovetails with the neighborhoods of structures around them while each having the best minimized structure of it's own.

      With only handfuls of individual facts, it can be difficult to build them up into an interesting or useful structure to start. Doing this may help to discover other facts. As these are added, one may reshape the overall structure of the theory as the puzzle begins to reveal itself and allow the theorist the ability to best structure an overall theory which minimizes itself and allows dovetailing with other external theories. All the theories then eventually form their own pieces which can then be pieced together for the next structural level up.

      See also Simon Singh, Thomas Kuhn, topology.

    1. While the proximate mechanisms of these anthropogenic changes are well studied (e.g., climate change, biodiversity loss, population growth), the evolutionary causality of these anthropogenic changes have been largely ignored.
      • for: climate change - evolutionary causes, cultural evolution - unsustainability, unsustainability
      • definition: Anthroecological theory (AET)
        • This theory proposes that the ultimate cause of anthropogenic environmental change is multi-level selection for niche construction and ecosystem engineering
    2. In AET, this process results in a species that is prone to niche construction and ecosystem engineering, and the scale of these processes continues to increase as the population rises. This increasing scale coupled with human propensity for niche construction leads to human unsustainability
      • for: for: ecological collapse, overshoot, progress trap, progress trap - cultural evolution, ultra-sociality, Lotka's maximum power, gene culture coevolution
      • key finding
        • paraphrase
          • In AET,
            • multi-level selection acting on the genome and
            • occurring in concert with selective and non-selective mechanisms acting on culture and technology
          • results in a species that is prone to
            • niche construction and
            • ecosystem engineering,
          • and the scale of these processes continues to increase as the population rises.
          • This increasing scale
            • coupled with human propensity for niche construction
          • leads to human unsustainability
    3. To Gowdy and Krall, the ultra-social nature of human groups allowed for a shift in the primary level of selection from the individual level to the group level. Thus, “With the transition to agriculture the group as an adaptive unit comes to constitute a wholly different gestalt driven by the imperative to produce surplus
      • for: ecological collapse, overshoot, progress trap, progress trap - cultural evolution, ultra-sociality, Lotka's maximum power
      • paraphrase
        • to Gowdy and Krall, the ultra-social nature of human groups allowed for a shift in the primary level of selection
          • from the individual level
          • to the group level.
        • Thus, “With the transition to agriculture the group as an adaptive unit comes to constitute a wholly different gestalt
          • driven by the imperative to produce surplus
    4. Anthroecological theory (AET) hypothesizes that human social and cultural evolution is the ultimate cause of the ecological crises currently damaging earth systems
      • for: AET, Anthroecological theory, anthropocene - causes, ecological crisis - roots, overshoot
      • paraphrase
        • Anthroecological theory (AET) hypothesizes that
          • human social and cultural evolution is the ultimate cause of the ecological crises currently damaging earth systems
      • for: gene culture coevolution, carrying capacity, unsustainability, overshoot, cultural evolution, progress trap

      • Title: The genetic and cultural evolution of unsustainability

      • Author: Brian F. Snyder

      • Abstract

      • Summary
      • Paraphrase
        • Anthropogenic changes are accelerating and threaten the future of life on earth.
        • While the proximate mechanisms of these anthropogenic changes are well studied
          • climate change,
          • biodiversity loss,
          • population growth
        • the evolutionary causality of these anthropogenic changes have been largely ignored.
        • Anthroecological theory (AET) proposes that the ultimate cause of anthropogenic environmental change is
          • multi-level selection for niche construction and ecosystem engineering.
        • Here, we integrate this theory with
          • Lotka’s Maximum Power Principle
        • and propose a model linking
          • energy extraction from the environment with
          • genetic, technological and cultural evolution
        • to increase human ecosystem carrying capacity.
        • Carrying capacity is partially determined by energetic factors such as
          • the net energy a population can acquire from its environment and
          • the efficiency of conversion from energy input to offspring output.
        • These factors are under Darwinian genetic selection
        • in all species,
        • but in humans, they are also determined by
          • technology and
          • culture.
        • If there is genetic or non-genetic heritable variation in
          • the ability of an individual or social group
        • to increase its carrying capacity,
        • then we hypothesize that - selection or cultural evolution will act - to increase carrying capacity.
        • Furthermore, if this evolution of carrying capacity occurs - faster than the biotic components of the ecological system can respond via their own evolution,
          • then we hypothesize that unsustainable ecological changes will result.
    1. Humans today are the descendants of those men who managed to dominate their opponents in war.
      • for: evolution, evolution - war, descendants - war
      • paraphrase
        • Genetic analyses of human Y chromosomes (which are passed directly from fathers to sons) reveal that
          • groups of men who succeeded on the battlefield replaced the losing groups of men in the gene pool.
        • In other words, the coalitions of men who were successful in warfare not only survived
          • but reproduced with local women and passed on their genes.
        • Success on the battlefield was thus highly consequential.
        • Humans today are the descendants of those men who managed to dominate their opponents in war. -comment
        • wow!
    2. Estimates indicate that nearly 20–30% of our male ancestors died in intergroup conflicts.
      • for: stats, quote, stats - homophobia - war, quote - homophobia - war, evolution - homophobia, homophobia - war
      • quote
      • stats
        • estimates indicate that nearly 20-30% of our male ancestors died in intergroup conflicts
      • comment
        • wow!
      • for cultural evolution, speed of cultural evolution, cumulative cultural evolution, progress trap, Freeman Dyson,
      • comment
        • Freeman Dyson opines that cultural evolution of humans now determines the genetic fate of all species on the planet
          • and gives a warning of how human cumulative cultural evolution now has the potential to threaten, via genetic sciences to play God over biology itself -reference
        • Musician Yoyo Ma quotes Freeman:
        • https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2F2fBmGXqHvk8%2F&group=world
    1. To preserve our wildlife as nature evolved it, the machinery of biological evolution must be protected from the homogenizing effects of cultural evolution.
      • for: cultural evolution, cumulative cultural evolution, speed of cultural evolution, progress trap, Freeman Dyson, Anthropocene
      • comment
        • while Freeman spoke to the direct dangers of genetic engineering,
          • he neglected to point out the broader threat of progress itself, which has already placed our species in the position
            • of playing God with the evolution of many species on the planet already, via the enormous impacts of organized human activity - ie. the Anthropocene
    2. The story that they are telling is of a grand transition that occurred about fifty thousand years ago, when the driving force of evolution changed from biology to culture, and the direction changed from diversification to unification of species. The understanding of this story can perhaps help us to deal more wisely with our responsibilities as stewards of our planet.
      • for: cumulative cultural evolution, speed of cultural evolution
      • paraphrase
        • The story that they are telling
        • is of a grand transition that occurred about fifty thousand years ago,
        • when the driving force of evolution changed
          • from biology
          • to culture,
        • and the direction changed
          • from diversification
          • to unification of species.
        • The understanding of this story can perhaps help us to deal more wisely with our responsibilities as stewards of our planet.
    1. Participation in a religious community generally correlates with better health outcomes and longer life, higher financial generosity, and more stable families—all of which are desperately needed in a nation with rising rates of loneliness, mental illness, and alcohol and drug dependency.

      It's really saying something that in paragraph 2 the "sell" for religion is the health and social benefits and outcomes rather than the love or support of god(s)!

  13. Jul 2023
    1. The consequences of our current choices bear not juston us. They bear on the continued evolutionary unfoldingof life in the universe. This marks the scale of our currentresponsibility
      • for: human impacts, MET, major evolutionary transition, progress trap, human responsibility to life, CCE, cumulative cultural evolution, playing God
      • comment
        • Very true, in fact our species is in the unprecedented position that
        • human activity, and specifically our cumulative cultural evolution (CCE) now determines the biological / genetic evolutionary future not only of our own species, but of all life on earth.
        • In other words, of evolution itself! -This is an awkward position as we have nowhere near the wisdom to play God and determine the future direction of evolution!
      • References
    1. the entire biosphere is made out of 00:41:23 um female desire for no reason no reason to it right night not with an objective of reproducing but just with an objective of wow that's really sexy I like it 00:41:35 and that's a very very good reason isn't it to to save the planet
      • for: climate communication, mass mobilization, collective action, climate messaging, beauty, evolution
      • claim
        • the natural world is sexy, beautiful, and it would be a waste to have it all destroyed
        • the entire biosphere is made out of female desire for no reason to it
          • not with an objective of reproducing
            • but just with an objective of wow that's really sexy I like it
          • and that's a very very good reason isn't it to to save the planet
        • these beautiful qualities that have no Rhyme or Reason to them but are actually to do with creativity and Imagination
          • are not some kind of special thing that human beings impose from some kind of abstract Heaven onto Earth
          • they are actually heaven on Earth
          • they're part of Heaven and they are coming out of our embodied biological being right and this is an amazing thing
            • pity and
            • compassion and
            • generosity
          • and all these things are are traits in primates
            • sharing things and
            • being kind right
          • and so I reckon you know the kind of religious feeling that we need to inculcate
          • it is actually about this feeling inside
            • this kind of surging feeling of
              • inspiration and
              • love and
              • passion
            • and everything is exactly coming to us from our Evolution and
            • it's coming for no reason at all
            • it's just coming from random genetic mutation and the fact that having these feelings doesn't kill you
          • so this is a very good reason I think to save Earth
          • the essence of us is
            • our future and
            • our physical biological being
          • and it's always just a little bit off to the side like tomorrow is just a little bit off to the side of today
            • but I'm going to get there at some point right and
            • I think that's the attitude
    1. Abstract
      • The Buddha taught that everything is
        • connected and
        • constantly changing.
      • These fundamental observations of the world are shared by
        • ecology and
        • evolution.
      • We are living in a time of unprecedented rates of extinction.
      • Science provides us with the information that we need to address this extinction crisis.
      • However, the problems underlying extinction generally do not result from a lack of scientific understanding,
        • but they rather result from an unwillingness to take the needed action.
      • I present mindfulness and meditative aspects of Zen practice that provide the deeper “knowing,” or awareness that we need to inspire action on these problems.

      • comment

        • emptiness is interdependency and change
        • in Deep Humanity praxis, it is equivalent to
          • human INTERbeing and
          • human INTERbeCOMing
    2. My overall objective in this paper is to
      • My overall objective in this paper is to
        • unite the sciences of ecology and evolution
        • with the spiritual practice of Zen
          • in order to inspire actions to address the extinction crisis that we are currently facing.
        • I do this by addressing the following three points:
          • Zen and science are both based upon empirical observations of the world.
          • Zen and science both tell us that there is no separation between humans and the world around us.
        • Ecology and evolution provide the scientific background needed to address the biodiversity crisis;
          • Zen provides the deeper knowing that will motivate our action to address this problem
      • Title
        • Zen and deep evolution: The optical delusion of separation
      • Author
        • Fred W. Allendorf
      • Date
        • 2018
      • Source

      • Abstract

        • The Buddha taught that everything is connected and constantly changing.
      • These fundamental observations of the world are shared by ecology and evolution.
        • We are living in a time of unprecedented rates of extinction.
      • Science provides us with the information that we need to address this extinction crisis.
        • However, the problems underlying extinction generally do not result from a lack of scientific understanding, -but they rather result from an unwillingness to take the needed action.
        • I present mindfulness and meditative aspects of Zen practice
          • that provide the deeper “knowing,” or awareness that we need to inspire action on these problems.
  14. Jun 2023
    1. Creation, (Samuel Goldwyn Films, 2009) https://www.kanopy.com/en/product/creation-2?vp=lapl

      Torn between faith and science, and suffering hallucinations, English naturalist Charles Darwin struggles to complete 'On the Origin of Species' and maintain his relationship with his wife.

      Director Jon Amiel Featuring: Jennifer Connelly, Benedict Cumberbatch, Toby Jones, Paul Bettany, Ian Kelly

  15. May 2023
    1. I am a product of your work I'm a product of the work of the people in 00:02:05 this room and watching this stream thanks to you to your actions your thoughts your memes I am Who I am today my learning and my capabilities have 00:02:16 been shaped but by what you've done
      • comment
        • example of
          • Cumulative Cultural Evolution (CCE)
    1. it is as if man had been suddenly appointed managing director of the biggest business of all the business of evolution appointed without being asked if he wanted it and without proper warning and preparation what is more he 00:05:49 can't refuse the job whether he wants to or not whether he is conscious of what he is doing or not he is in point of fact determining the future direction of evolution on this earth that is his 00:06:02 inescapable Destiny and the sooner he realizes it and starts believing in it the better for all concerns
      • quote

        • "it is as if man had been suddenly appointed managing director of the biggest business of all the business of evolution appointed without being asked if he wanted it and without proper warning and preparation what is more he can't refuse the job whether he wants to or not whether he is conscious of what he is doing or not he is in point of fact determining the future direction of evolution on this earth that is his inescapable Destiny and the sooner he realizes it and starts believing in it the better for all concerns"
        • Julian Huxley
      • Comment

  16. Apr 2023
    1. But if you think in evolutionary models, randomness has a prominent role. (9)9 Without it, nothing progresses anyhow.

      Nothing progresses without randomness.


      Think about this for a bit. True/untrue? Provable? Counterexamples?

    1. “what could we appeal to that is so strong, so compelling that it spurs the kind of collective action and coordination needed to tackle the dangers of exponential technology?”

      // - To find a God that can kill Moloch - requires an understanding of the nature of progress as well - Relationship to progress traps - Exponential technologies - are technologies, and all suffer the same fundamental flaw - Progress is an expression of our cumulative cultural evolution - https://jonudell.info/h/facet/?max=100&expanded=true&user=stopresetgo&exactTagSearch=true&any=cumulative+cultural+evolution - which grows exponentially faster than genetic evolution - The problem of which is that - the shadow side of progress, the progress trap - - https://jonudell.info/h/facet/?max=100&expanded=true&user=stopresetgo&exactTagSearch=true&any=progress%2Btrap - is growing even faster, due to our misunderstanding of it, - allowing it to fester like an untreated wound - turning a minor condition, into a life-threatening disease - Human progress has always been a bungling two step forwards, one step backwards dance - the imperfections of progress are inherent - and baked into the innovation process itself - For we develop technologies based on what we know, or what is visible - but what we know is like the tip of the latent knowledge iceberg - and is always accompanied by a much larger hidden component of what we don't know - In other words, - finite and visible knowledge - is always accompanied by infinite and invisible ignorance - Design is based on intent, - a one dimensional, inherently myopic imagination - of a multi-dimensional reality - A problem is a one dimensional focus - on a small sliver of reality - A solution to the problem is necessarily - myopic and - one dimensional as well - Both problems and their (designed) solutions - are extreme simplifications of a complex system - Language itself is a way - to direct and focus our attention - to this aspect of reality - then that aspect - Thinking is reduced to parts, and never experiences the whole, undivided gestalt of reality - Out of this process - Progress traps are born //

  17. Mar 2023
    1. Our core criteria follow the definition of CCE provided in Tomasello's quotation above. We suggest that the minimum requirements for a population to exhibit CCE are (i) a change in behaviour (or product of behaviour, such as an artefact), typically due to asocial learning, followed by (ii) the transfer via social learning of that novel or modified behaviour to other individuals or groups, where (iii) the learned behaviour causes an improvement in performance, which is a proxy of genetic and/or cultural fitness, with (iv) the previous three steps repeated in a manner that generates sequential improvement over time.

      Definition - Cumulative Cultural Evolution - The core criteria follow the definition of CCE provided in Tomasello's quotation above - A population exhibits CCE iff - (i) a change in behaviour (or product of behaviour, such as an artefact), typically due to asocial learning, followed by - (ii) the transfer via social learning of that novel or modified behaviour to other individuals or groups, where - (iii) the learned behaviour causes an improvement in performance, - which is a proxy of genetic and/or cultural fitness, with - (iv) the previous three steps repeated in a manner that generates sequential improvement over time.

    2. In contrast [to non-human species' cultural traditions], human cultures do accumulate changes over many generations, resulting in culturally transmitted behaviors that no single human individual could invent on their own.
      • Boyd & Richerson give a nice explanation of CCE
      • In contrast [to non-human species' cultural traditions],
        • human cultures do accumulate changes over many generations,
        • resulting in culturally transmitted behaviors that no single human individual could invent on their own.
    3. In recent years, the phenomenon of cumulative cultural evolution (CCE) has become the focus of major research interest in biology, psychology and anthropology. Some researchers argue that CCE is unique to humans and underlies our extraordinary evolutionary success as a species. Others claim to have found CCE in non-human species. Yet others remain sceptical that CCE is even important for explaining human behavioural diversity and complexity. These debates are hampered by multiple and often ambiguous definitions of CCE. Here, we review how researchers define, use and test CCE. We identify a core set of criteria for CCE which are both necessary and sufficient, and may be found in non-human species. We also identify a set of extended criteria that are observed in human CCE but not, to date, in other species. Different socio-cognitive mechanisms may underlie these different criteria. We reinterpret previous theoretical models and observational and experimental studies of both human and non-human species in light of these more fine-grained criteria. Finally, we discuss key issues surrounding information, fitness and cognition. We recommend that researchers are more explicit about what components of CCE they are testing and claiming to demonstrate.

      Title: What is cumulative cultural evolution (CCE)?

      Authors: - Alex Mesoudi - Alex Thornton

      Abstract - In recent years, cumulative cultural evolution (CCE) has become the focus of major research interest in - biology, - psychology and - anthropology. - There is a range of opinions on CCE - some argue that CCE is unique to humans - and underlies our extraordinary evolutionary success as a species. - Others claim to have found CCE in non-human species. - Yet others remain sceptical that CCE is even important for explaining - human behavioural diversity and - complexity. - These debates are hampered by multiple and often ambiguous definitions of CCE. - Here, we review how researchers define, use and test CCE. - We identify a core set of criteria for CCE - which are both necessary and sufficient, and - may be found in non-human species. - We also identify a set of extended criteria - that are observed in human CCE - but not, to date, in other species. - Different socio-cognitive mechanisms may underlie these different criteria. - We reinterpret - previous theoretical models and - observational and - experimental studies of both - human and - non-human species - in light of these more fine-grained criteria. - Finally, we discuss key issues surrounding information, fitness and cognition. - We recommend that researchers are more explicit about what components of CCE they are testing and claiming to demonstrate.

    1. Hierbei handelt es sich um eine Sammlung von Notizen, die Luhmann vermutlich zwischen 1952 und 1961 angelegt hat (mit einzelnen späteren Nachträgen; Notizen insbesondere zum Themenkomplex Weltgesellschaft wurden allerdings noch bis ca. 1973 durchweg in diese Sammlung eingestellt). Die insgesamt ca. 23.000 Zettel verteilen sich auf die ersten sieben physischen Auszüge des Kastens sowie auf kleinere Registerabteilungen, die im 17. Auszug der zweiten Sammlung (physischer Auszug 24) stehen. Die Notizen sind im Wesentlichen in der Zeit entstanden, als Luhmann als Rechtsreferendar in Lüneburg bzw. als Regierungsrat im Kultusministerium in Niedersachen gearbeitet hat und dokumentieren seine Lektüre verwaltungs- bzw. staatswissenschaftlicher, philosophischer und zunehmend auch organisationstheoretischer sowie soziologischer Literatur.

      According to the Niklas Luhmann-Archiv, Luhmann began his first zettelkasten in 1952 likely when he was working as a legal trainee in Lüneburg or as a government councilor in the Ministry of Education in Lower Saxony.

      This timeframe would have been just after Johannes Erich Heyde had published the 8th edition of Technik des wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens in 1951.

      Link to: - https://hypothes.is/a/Jn9elsk5Ee2hsLP5WWBEBw on dates of NL ZK - https://hypothes.is/a/CqGhGvchEey6heekrEJ9WA aktenzeichen - https://hypothes.is/a/4wxHdDqeEe2OKGMHXDKezA Clemens Luhmann link

    1. Another way to widen the pool of stakeholders is for government regulators to get into the game, indirectly representing the will of a larger electorate through their interventions.

      This is certainly "a way", but history has shown, particularly in the United States, that government regulation is unlikely to get involved at all until it's far too late, if at all. Typically they're only regulating not only after maturity, but only when massive failure may cause issues for the wealthy and then the "regulation" is to bail them out.

      Suggesting this here is so pie-in-the sky that it only creates a false hope (hope washing?) for the powerless. Is this sort of hope washing a recurring part of

    2. ‘‘I think it lets us be more thoughtful and more deliberate about safety issues,’’ Altman says. ‘‘Part of our strategy is: Gradual change in the world is better than sudden change.’’

      What are the long term effects of fast breaking changes and gradual changes for evolved entities?

    1. The technological revolution of past decades has led teaching and learning of evolutionary biology to move away from its naturalist origins.

      Such a powerful opening statement that captures that changes technology has made within the past few decades. A sign that we are moving further from our past natural selves as a species.

    1. Title: Fox News producer files explosive lawsuits against the network, alleging she was coerced into providing misleading Dominion testimony

      // - This is an example of how big media corporations can deceive the public and compromise the truth - It helps create a nation of misinformed people which destabilizes political governance - the workspace sounds toxic - the undertone of this story: the pathological transformation of media brought about by capitalism - it is the need for ratings, which is the indicator for profit in the marketing world, that has corrupted the responsibility to report truthfully - making money becomes the consumerist dream at the expense of all else of intrinsic value within a culture - knowledge is what enables culture to exist, modernity is based on cumulative cultural evolution - this is an example of NON-conscious cumulative cultural evolution or pathological cumulaitve cultural evolution

      • Title: Buddhism and Money: The Repression of Emptiness Today
      • Author: David Loy

      David Loy explains how - the denial of ego-self, also known as anatma - becomes the root of a persistent sense of lack - as self-consciousness continues to try to ground itself, reify itself and make itself real - while all the meanwhile it is a compelling mental construction

      A good paper on the role (non-rational) relational ritual can play to help us out of the current polycrisis is given here: https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Fbrill.com%2Fview%2Fjournals%2Fwo%2F25%2F2%2Farticle-p113_1.xml%3Flanguage%3Den&group=world

    1. It has been suggested that - the human species may be undergoing an evolutionary transition in individuality (ETI).

      there is disagreement about - how to apply the ETI framework to our species - and whether culture is implicated - as either cause or consequence.

      Long-term gene–culture coevolution (GCC) i- s - also poorly understood.

      argued that - culture steers human evolution,

      Others proposed - genes hold culture on a leash.

      After review of the literature and evidence on long-term GCC in humans - emerge a set of common themes. - First, culture appears to hold greater adaptive potential than genetic inheritance - and is probably driving human evolution. - The evolutionary impact of culture occurs - mainly through culturally organized groups, - which have come to dominate human affairs in recent millennia. - Second, the role of culture appears to be growing, - increasingly bypassing genetic evolution and weakening genetic adaptive potential. -Taken together, these findings suggest that human long-term GCC is characterized by - an evolutionary transition in inheritance - from genes to culture - which entails a transition in individuality (from genetic individual to cultural group). Research on GCC should focus on the possibility of - an ongoing transition in the human inheritance system.

    1. "In the very long term, we suggest that humans are evolving from individual genetic organisms to cultural groups which function as superorganisms, similar to ant colonies and beehives,"
      • Quote
        • In the very long term, we suggest that humans are evolving from individual genetic organisms to cultural groups which function as superorganisms, similar to ant colonies and beehives,
        • Tim Waring
    2. It’s possible, the researchers suggest, that the appearance of human culture represents a key evolutionary milestone.
      • key observation
        • human culture may represent a key evolutionary milestone
        • culture may be the next evolutionary transition state
          • pre-single self organisms like mitochondria increased fitness by sharing the environment with other life forms and formed the single cell
          • then multi-cellular organisms set the stage for the next big evolutionary paradigm
          • splitting into plants and animals
          • sexual reproduction
          • transition to land
        • we are possibly undergoing the next major evolutionary transition
        • in which we will still evolve genetically,
        • but genetics may not determine human survival as much as culture does
    3. Here's why: Culture is group-oriented, and people in those groups talk to, learn from and imitate one another. These group behaviors allow people to pass on adaptations they learned through culture faster than genes can transmit similar survival benefits. An individual can learn skills and information from a nearly unlimited number of people in a small amount of time and, in turn, spread that information to many others. And the more people available to learn from, the better. Large groups solve problems faster than smaller groups, and intergroup competition stimulates adaptations that might help those groups survive. As ideas spread, cultures develop new traits.In contrast, a person only inherits genetic information from two parents and racks up relatively few random mutations in their eggs or sperm, which takes about 20 years to be passed on to their small handful of children. That's just a much slower pace of change.
      • key observation
      • paraphrase
      • why cultural evolution is too fast for genetic evolution

        • Culture is group-oriented, and people in those groups talk to, learn from and imitate one another.
        • These group behaviors allow people to pass on adaptations they learned through culture faster than genes can transmit similar survival benefits.
        • An individual can learn skills and information from a nearly unlimited number of people in a small amount of time
          • and, in turn, spread that information to many others.
        • And the more people available to learn from, the better.
        • Large groups solve problems faster than smaller groups,
        • and intergroup competition stimulates adaptations that might help those groups survive.
        • As ideas spread, cultures develop new traits.

        • In contrast, a person only inherits genetic information from two parents

          • and racks up relatively few random mutations in their eggs or sperm, which takes about 20 years to be passed on to their small handful of children.
        • That's just a much slower pace of change.
    4. human culture may be driving evolution faster than genetic mutations can work.

      !- key finding - human culture may be driving evolution faster than genetic mutation can work - the major delay, measured in many orders of magnitude - does not allow genetic evolution to adapt quickly enough - to harmful environmental changes brought about through cultural evolution

    5. Humans might be making genetic evolution obsolete
      • TItle: Humans might be making genetic evolution obsolete
    1. As a consequence of sociocultural niche construction, humans have become a global force of nature – for better and for worse. It is only by embracing these sociocultural realities that we might shape better futures for both humans and non-human species alike.

      // In Other Words

      • we must undo the myopic cultural evolution that has already taken place with a more collectively conscious form of cultural evolution //
    1. Gene–culture coevolution and the nature of human sociality
      • Title: Gene–culture coevolution and the nature of human sociality
      • Author: Herbert Gintis

      //Abstract - Summary - Human characteristics are the product of gene–culture coevolution, - which is an evolutionary dynamic involving the interaction of genes and culture - over long time periods. - Gene–culture coevolution is a special case of niche construction. - Gene–culture coevolution is responsible for: - human other-regarding preferences, - a taste for fairness, - the capacity to empathize and - salience of morality and character virtues.

      • Title: Human niche construction in interdisciplinary focus
      • Author:
        • Jeremy Kendal
        • Jamshid J. Tehrani
        • John Oding-Smee
      • Abstract
        • summary
        • Niche construction is an endogenous causal process in evolution,
      • reciprocal to the causal process of natural selection.
        • It works by adding ecological inheritance,
        • comprising the inheritance of natural selection pressures previously modified by niche construction,
        • to genetic inheritance in evolution.
        • Human niche construction modifies selection pressures in environments in ways that affect both human evolution, and the evolution of other species.
        • Human ecological inheritance is exceptionally potent
        • because it includes the social transmission and inheritance
        • of cultural knowledge, and material culture.
        • Human genetic inheritance
        • in combination with human cultural inheritance
        • thus provides a basis for gene–culture coevolution,
        • and multivariate dynamics in cultural evolution.
        • Niche construction theory potentially integrates the biological and social aspects of the human sciences.
        • We elaborate on these processes,
        • and provide brief introductions to each of the papers published in this theme issue.
    1. Abstract
      • Abstract
      • summary
        • The exhibition of increasingly intensive and complex niche construction behaviors through time
        • is a key feature of human evolution,
        • culminating in the advanced capacity for ecosystem engineering exhibited by Homo sapiens.
        • A crucial outcome of such behaviors has been the dramatic reshaping of the global biosphere,
          • a transformation whose early origins are increasingly apparent
          • from cumulative archaeological and paleoecological datasets.
        • Such data suggest that, by the Late Pleistocene,
        • humans had begun to engage in activities
        • that have led to alterations in the distributions of a vast array of species
        • across most, if not all, taxonomic groups.
        • Changes to biodiversity have included
          • extinctions,
          • extirpations, and
          • shifts in species
            • composition,
            • diversity, and
            • community structure.
        • We outline key examples of these changes,
        • highlighting findings from the study of new datasets, like
          • ancient DNA (aDNA),
          • stable isotopes, and
          • microfossils, as well as
          • the application of new statistical and computational methods to datasets that have accumulated significantly in recent decades.
        • We focus on four major phases that witnessed broad anthropogenic alterations to biodiversity:
          • the Late Pleistocene global human expansion,
          • the Neolithic spread of agriculture,
          • the era of island colonization, and
          • the emergence of early urbanized societies and commercial networks.
        • Archaeological evidence documents millennia of anthropogenic transformations
        • that have created novel ecosystems around the world.
        • This record has implications for:
          • ecological and evolutionary research,
          • conservation strategies, and
          • the maintenance of ecosystem services,
        • pointing to a significant need for broader cross-disciplinary engagement between:
          • archaeology
          • the biological sciences and
          • the environmental sciences.
    2. Ecological consequences of human niche construction: Examining long-term anthropogenic shaping of global species distributions
      • Title: Ecological consequences of human niche construction: Examining long-term anthropogenic shaping of global species distributions
      • Author:
        • Nicole L. Bolvin
        • Melinda A. Zeder
        • Dorian O. Fuller
        • Michael D. Petraglia
    1. Why is it, then, that although publicly is far more common as the adverbial form of public than publically, the ratio of usage has diminished? Publically is becoming more common for the same reason that people write irregardless in place of regardless or write “diffuse the situation” instead of “defuse the situation” or “all of the sudden” rather than “all of a sudden”: evolution. Language is, in a sense, alive, and just as life itself evolves, so does language—but note that the primary definition of evolution is not “improvement”; it simply means “change.” And how does language change? The change is modeled: New words are coined, or new senses of existing words develop (or new spellings or new forms occur), because someone, somewhere acts to make it so, and the evolution goes viral.