516 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Nov 2019
    1. In the case of library users, there is a strong tie between technology and library use. For instance, the technology-rich profiles of Information Omnivores might suggest that their gadgets could provide all the media and data they could possibly need—yet they still patronize libraries at high levels.

      I thought this particular detail was rather illuminating. A common belief is that technology will eventually make the library obsolete. Yet, the correlation between high technology use and high library use runs counter to this belief. It is stated later, on page 3, that the highest engagement groups share a love for books, traditional paper books. They also have the highest technology use. To me, this suggests that the library should not disregard, even in the day-and-age of smartphones, their book collection. This is still the primary draw to the library for their high engagement groups and even to medium engagement groups like the Print Traditionalists. I think this is an encouraging note; people still like books and people still like to get books from the library, despite having pocket computers. But, librarians can't disregard technology either. After reading this study, I think the appropriate way for librarians to understand technology is not as a hostile take-over, but similar to how the people of this study found it to be. Technology is an "add on," a supplement to information resources. The library should provide access to books AND a wide array of relevant digital and technology resources.

    1. Integrating Technology with Bloom’s Taxonomy

      This article was published by a team member of the ASU Online Instructional Design and New Media (IDNM) team at Arizona State University. This team shares instructional design methods and resources on the TeachOnline site for online learning. "Integrating Technology with Bloom's Taxonomy" describes practices for implementing 6 principles of Bloom's Digital Taxonomy in online learning. These principles include Creating, Evaluating, Analyzing, Applying, Understanding, and Remembering. The purpose of implementing this model is to create more meaningful and effective experiences for online learners. The author guides instructors in the selection of digital tools that drive higher-order thinking, active engagmenent, and relevancy. Rating 9/10

    1. Training and Development Policy Wiki

      This webpage, under the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) .gov site, provides an extensive list of technology resources that can be and have been implemented into a variety of employee deveolpment programs. These tools allow for more personalized learning, active participation, collaboration, and communication.In the first section of the site, examples of Web 2.0 tools are listed that can promote collaboration and constructive learning. You can also find technologies that are used in specific sectors, such as the Federal Government and the Private Sector. Clicking on the links redirects you to additional resources on the tech tools, including how to use them effectively and professionally for employee training. Rating 10/10

    1. Using Technology to Enhance Teaching & Learning

      This website provides technology teaching resources as part of the Southern Methodist University (SMU) Center for Teaching Excellence. Users can find informational links to various technology tools that can be used for enhancing teaching and learning in online, hybrid, or face-to-face courses. On the right of the page under "Technology," users can click on the tech tools for additional resources/research on their implementation. Examples of these technologies include Blackboard LMS, PowerPoint presentation software, Google Suite products, blogs, and social media sites. Rating 8/10

    1. Empowering Education: A New Model for In-service Training of Nursing Staff

      This research article explores an andragogical method of learning for the in-service training of nurses. In a study of a training period for 35 nurses, research found an empowering model of education that was characterized by self-directed learning and practical learning. This model suggests active participation, motivation, and problem-solving as key indicators of effective training for nurses. Rating 8/10

    1. Digital Literacy Initiatives

      This website outlines digital literacy initiatives provided by the Literacy Information and Communication System (LINCS). The U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) implements these intitatives to aid adult learners in the successful use of technology in their education and careers. Students have free access to learning material on different subjects under the "LINCS Learner Center" tab. Teachers and tutors also have access to resoruces on implementing educational technology for professional development and effective instruction. Rating 8/10

    1. 1Engaging Adults Learners with TechnologyThrough

      Instruction Librarians from the Twin Cities Campus Library created this instructional gudie as a workshop for implementing technology for adult learning. First, the authors describe key characteristics of adult learners as identified in the theory of andragogy. Examples of these characteristics include the need to know, learner responsibility, past experiences, and motivation to learn. The authors then suggest instructional practices and activities to meet the needs of adult learners, Finally, they provide examples of technology tools for effectively engaging adult learners. Rating 10/10

    2. Designed to be used in a workshop setting, the content provides an understanding of adult learning theory and it's application of best practices in both face to face and e-learning environments. Participants are provided a list of web tools to facilitate learning.

      6/10: the format is bit difficult to access out of context

    1. ISTE Standards Transform learning and teaching.

      This resource is the website for the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), which serves educators and professionals in the implementation of technology in education. The site provides open access readings, learning guides, and membership material for educators' development with technology. You can also find ISTE Standards for teachers, students, technology coaches, and educational leaders/administrators. These standards serve as the skills and knowledge each group should obtain for effective teaching and learning with technology.

    1. Section 1.5 Online Learner Characteristics, Technology and Skill Requirements

      This website outlines Section 1.5 of Angelo State University's guide to instructional design and online teaching. Section 1.5 describes key characteristics of online learners, as well as the technology and computer skills that research has identified as being important for online learners. Successful online learners are described as self-directed, motivated, well-organized, and dedicated to their education. The article also notes that online learners should understand how to use technology such as multimedia tools, email, internet browsers. and LMS systems. This resource serves as a guide to effective online teaching. Rating 10/10

    1. E-Learning Theory (Mayer, Sweller, Moreno)

      This website outlines key principles of the E-Learning Theory developed by Mayer, Sweller, and Moreno. E-Learning Theory describes how the implementation of educational technology can be combined with key principles of how we learn for better outcomes. This site describes those principles as a guide of more effective instructional design. Users can also find other learning theories under the "Categories" link at the top of the page. Examples include Constructivist theories, Media & Technology theories, and Social Learning theories. Rating: 8/10

    1. Learning Domains

      This website provides several examples of domains adults may learn in or engage with. By clicking on each type, you are redirected to a detailed description of the domain. Descriptions include, but are not limited to, definitions, theories and research behind the topic, and real-world examples. You can also find references used in the description, which can be helpful for further exploration. This InstructionalDesign.org website also provides extensive lists of learning concepts (i.e. motivation, personalized learning, storyboard, etc.) and theories (i.e. Adult Learning Theory, Social Learning, Constructivism, etc.). Each learning theory link provides a theoretical definition, applications, examples, key principles, references, and related websites. Rating 10/10.

    1. Tech Literacy Resources

      This website is the "Resources" archive for the IgniteED Labs at Arizona State University's Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College. The IgniteED Labs allow students, staff, and faculty to explore innovative and emerging learning technology such as virtual reality (VR), artifical intelligence (AI), 3-D printing, and robotics. The left side of this site provides several resources on understanding and effectively using various technologies available in the IgniteED labs. Each resources directs you to external websites, such as product tutorials on Youtube, setup guides, and the products' websites. The right column, "Tech Literacy Resources," contains a variety of guides on how students can effectively and strategically use different technologies. Resources include "how-to" user guides, online academic integrity policies, and technology support services. Rating: 9/10

    1. In the text "10 Current and Emerging Trends in Adult Education," ten current trends are briefly reviewed. Among these are the emphasis on effort, growth, and social-emotional learning. In terms of technology, real-life simulations and AI are being used to better prepare learners for their professional encounters and responsibilities. In terms of what is on the horizon for adult learning, one can expect mastery to be emphasized rather than degrees. As a result of the information economy, it is expected that income inequality will grow and thus advocacy for adult learners and continued opportunities for working adults to grow will mitigate the negative consequences. Rating: 7/10

  3. www-chronicle-com.libproxy.nau.edu www-chronicle-com.libproxy.nau.edu
    1. Technology

      This website explores technology news within the field of higher education. The site contains a wide variety of news articles on current issues, trends, and research surrounding the integration of technology in universities and colleges. This includes technology's prevalence in teaching and learning, institutional decisions, and societal trends of higher education. The articles are published by authors for "The Chronicle of Higher Education," a leading newspaper and website for higher education journalism. Rating: 7/10

    1. Hodson relates specific examples of effective technology integration in her classrooms. Although she acknowledges the apprehension both instructors and learners feel, she argues that the benefits outweigh them.

      7/10

    2. Twitter offers two distinct benefits to engaging learners. First of all, it allows learners to respond to classroom discussions in a way that feels right for them, offering shy or introverted students a chance to participate in the class discussion without having to speak in a public forum. Secondly, it allows students to continue the conversation after class is completed, posting relevant links to course material, and reaching out to you (the educator) with additional thoughts or questions.

      The article explains how social media, student learning through digital experience, and Learning Management Systems can be beneficial to the learner/student. Article Rating: 3/5

    1. Although not specifically geared toward adult learning, the article includes valuable insight into the role technology can play in non-profit organizations. Boles's focuses on how non-profit organizations can enhance their work integrating technology into three key areas: service delivery, fundraising, and outreach. Of particular interest are the sections on barriers to integration and how to overcome them.

      7/10

    1. The authors present a study that compared face to face and hybrid instruction in graduate classes for counseling students. The results indicate that using technology, including web tools to facilitate instruction, improved test results in a small sample of students.

      8/10

    1. Flores examines the current research as it relates to distance learning. She explores technology integration and learning theory. Throughout, she stresses the importance of professional development for instructors to equip them to provide quality distance education.

      10/10

    1. The authors detail their development of a professional learning community to advance technology integration at Nova Southeastern University. After a literature review of the key components of online learning, they discuss the method of implementing the PLC and the major outcomes and then offer recommendations for starting a PLC within institutions of higher ed.

      10/10

    1. Thomas and Gilbert offer a literature review of current technologies available to improve athlete performance. They provide a brief theoretical foundation for the technologies and how they can be sued to improve athletic and personal performance.

      8/10

    1. The study examines uses of mobile technology, namely cloud computing and self assessment, to improve nursing instruction. The authors evaluate mlearning environments and the potential barriers to their success.

      9/10

    1. Coffey argues the effectiveness of online literature discussions in the elementary classroom. Addressing both synchronous and asynchronous environments, she suggests that computer-based discussions can enhance understanding of literature and promote community within the classroom.

      10/10

    1. This manual, published by Hanover Research, outlines theory and practice of technology integration in the K-12 classroom and provides key strategies for professional development to equip teachers to successfully integrate technology.

      10/10

    1. The authors present the benefits of coaching in professional development for educators in today's technologically advanced classrooms. Of particular interest is the explanation of the different methods of coaching: executive, coactive, cognitive, and instructional. They suggest that coaching provides more successful outcomes than single workshops and stress that finding the correct method for each situation and organization is crucial.

      10/10

    1. Davis and Curry stress the importance of tech coaches in schools to help instructors integrate technology effectively. They present key factors to consider when using tech coaching, including the importance of having a clear plan and defined roles.

      8/10

    1. To optimize learners' experience and the efficacy of learning outcomes, instructors need to consider how technology can offer approaches better suited to adult learning.

      This website from University of Arizona provides a list of trends and issues in learning technologies

      Rating 9/10

    1. Teaching and learning methods: opreparing for teaching ofacilitating the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes oteaching and learning in groups ofacilitating learning and setting ground rules oexplaining ogroup dynamics omanaging the group olectures osmall group teaching methods and discussion techniques oseminars and tutorials ocomputer based teaching and learning – information technology and the World Wide Web ointroducing problem based learning ocase based learning and clinical scenarios

      this website is consisted of available resources.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. a promising technology for decades that's never truly caught on. That's constantly changing with the current wave of VR products,

      PC magazine is a online compuer magazine, based on popular topics ranging form hackers to smartphones.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. As educational technologies, instructional design and online learning/content delivery platforms keep evolving, more learners with more needs and motives will be drawn to taking online courses – a growing demand that in turn will spur further improvements in technology and delivery.

      Educational Technology offers free articles with sources.

      Rating: 5/10

    1. From Peg Cheechi, an instructional designer at Rush University: informing faculty members about the advantages of working with experts in course design.

      The Chronicle of Higher Education is a website and newspaper informing students and faculty of college affairs and news.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. This book is current from 2015 and is one stop shopping for technology integration in schools. Integrations and Blooms taxonomy theory, ISTE standards, pathways (yes, it is still a slow process), understanding about classroom set up when using technology and learning theories, online, web 2.0, teacher resources, multilingual tools, different screens, digital cameras, and COPPA, Privacy, and Copyright laws. If you are looking for a job in technology integration in schools this is a must read and resource manual. rating 10/10

    1. This ebook talks about autism and the college student. It is the responsibility of colleges and universities to accommodate people with disabilities including those with autism. If a child has an IEP in most cases he can expect to receive the same or adequate accommodations. Some assistive technologies that universities can offer are computers, Live Scrib smart pens, calculators, Dragon Voice recognition software. The importance of knowing and understanding that there are a wide spectrum on the autistic scale means that with assistive technology an entire door is open to people that can lead to more independence and positive contributions to the world. For reference pages 12, 16, and 19 directly discuss AT. Score 9/10

    1. This is an interesting article for assistive technology in adult literacy as you can listen to it like a person with LD would. Initially, it was beneficial, but load times and generic voice are challenging for me, but I am not used to using the AT device. Also interesting is the lack of study on the matter of LD in adult literacy, and therefore this study is really "surveying the gaps." Sadly, what we do know is that minority LD students rates for graduation are lower than whites with LD, and that the dropout rates are higher as well. LD students access to AT may be key to understanding the dynamics of graduation and drop out rates in addition to literacy. A proven solution is small group tutoring with AT as it can be empowering and enabling LD students to learn.

    1. This article studies assistive technology and website courses the usage, extent of use, and patterns of 964 students with and without LD. The study showed that student's with LD accessed their online classroom more times than students without LD. In addition, LD student's posted more messages in the classroom, understand better how to use the classroom forum, and assistive technology. The study used the Hope Scale and the Subject of Well Being Scale through questionnaires where in both the student's scored higher than those without LD. I like the article, easy to understand and not complicated. 8/10

    1. This article discusses the narrowing gap between asisstive technology and instructional technology. Assistive Technology are strategies (although techniques in another article) used by learners with disabilities to overcome adversity in their education. Many of the technologies used in school today also assist those with disabilities. This is exciting because as technology grows people that have trouble reading printed material, or understanding material can use computer devices to read, learn, and understand.

    1. This web page can be used in many ways because it has theories from the old to new in education and technology, and from institutions to working environments, and military. You will find George Bush, Steve Jobs, and Seymour Papert from MIT, just to name a few.

      It is really nice to see new and not so new perspectives of people that do not provide learning theories, but combine learning theories with technology, which to me is relevant for today's educators and learners. 5/10

    1. This article offers insight to technology integration for adults in Arizona. Recognizing the importance of technology in education, Arizona has put together a plan on integration for adult education. Using trends, understanding challenges, devising strategies to meet those challenges now and in the future, and meeting the expectations of how a successful learner is defined are a part of this plan for Arizona. It starts with a vision and three goals for Arizona. From there the goals and trends are implemented in short term, mid term, and long term goals over five plus years. With expecting challenges they are able to address them head on and use innovative practices. 8/10

    1. The text "Adult Learners Come to Campus With Unique Technology Needs" illustrates the barriers to learning that surround a learner's experience with technology. Author David Hutchins suggests having inclusive discussions with diverse sets of technology users to best determine their needs, issues, and reasonable solutions for support. Multi-level support for multiple generations of learners includes the instructors, administration, and IT teams that work together to improve education via technology. Embedding links throughout the text re-direct the reader to valuable resources for further review. Rating: 7/10

    2. Hutchins addresses the need for institutions of higher education to meet the growing population of adult learners who are returning to school to gain relevant professional skills. The three recommendations are solutions-focused and practical.

      7/10

    1. Section 508 compliance is discussed to support instructors knowledge of section 508 and how to begin the process of ensuring instructional content is 508 compliant. Section 508 of the federal Rehabilitation Act governs access of media to all persons whether they have a disability or not. Including captions, audio description, and accessible video players are vital to compliance. Compliance with 508 is necessary given that data that illustrates the percent of employees that have need for accommodations to support their learning. This brief article seems highly related to Universal Design of Learning. Rating: 10/10

    1. Leaders must weigh the pros and cons of using time, a valuable resource, to teach new technologies to faculty, and, further down the line, for faculty to teach to students.

      The article focuses on the topic of how some adults are being challenged by new technology. Although the new technology has some exciting new features to assist teachers these days. Technology today is different and adult learners are faced with difficulty in trying to use it. The author expresses the four cognitive levels of knowledge (unconscious not knowing, conscious no knowing, conscious knowing, and unconscious not knowing). Not only is it difficult for the learners but it is difficult for the teacher to implement technology into curriculum. In this article, different types of technology has been researched to determine what type is good for adult students. Rating: 4/5

    1. the younger educators are more inclined to use technology to enhance learning. It can be very time consuming and because of this many enthusiastic educators fall by the way and refuse to preserve with the task of using technology in the classroom.

      This author of this article discusses the topic of how some teachers are comfortable with their form of teaching with no technology in their curriculum or their classroom. The author expresses that technology promotes changes in behavior and grasping teaching skills. The use of technology in the classroom is a good tool for the students. Rating: 4/5

    1. ABE includes programs thatprovide instruction in reading, writing, math, communications, and other basicskills as it prepares these students to take the General Educational Development(GED) exam.

      The article was great resource for the topic for technology and how it is being used in the classroom, specifically in basic skills (reading, writing, math, and communication) that assist the student to take the GED exam. The article expresses on the topics of the impact of technology, technology integration, technology barriers/anxiety, the need for the study, and the research results. Rating: 4/5

  4. www.calpro-online.org www.calpro-online.org
    1. The uniqueeducational benefits as well as limitations of the four approachesare technology as curriculum, as delivery mechanism, ascomplement to instruction, and as instructional tool.

      The article expressed the topic of technology in adult learning. The author described on the topics and provided the benefits and limitations of the following five topics: Technology as Curriculum, Technology as Delivery Mechanism, Technology as a Complement to Instruction, Technology as an Instructional Tool, Choosing and Using the Different Approaches. Rate 4/5

    1. Although educators may use technology for personal use, technology may not be used to supportlearningor prepare students for thecurrent digital culture.

      This article focused on how K-8 and K-5 classrooms fail to use the technology in their classrooms. In the first section of this article, the author defines the problem and provides a conceptual framework for the problem. In the second section of this article, the author presents the research, data that was collected during the study, and the participants that were involved. In section three, the project description and the projected goal was shared. Along with the literature that was reviewed, obstacles that were encountered, evaluation, and changes that were made to change the predicted outcome. The last section, section four concluded with the strengths, limitations, other approaches that were encountered during the project. The project closed out with the analysis, changes that effected the project/social change, and future research. Rate: 4/5

    1. Faculty must spend time learning how to use the technology and ensuring that adequate institutional support is present to make the technology work.

      This article reflects on how technology is incorporated into adult learning (Androgogy). Which is explained by using the six assumptions and their implications for technology-based instruction (The Learners Need to Know, The Learner’s Self-concept, The Role of the Learner’s Experience, A Student’s Readiness to Learn, The Student’s Orientation to Learning, Students’ Motivation to Learn. Rate: 3/5

    1. The Digital Promise article presents four major factors to consider when implementing technology for adult learning purposes. The factors include flexibility and benefits of blended learning, data use to support development of instruction, environments with diverse technology available support various learners, and allow the instructor's role to change to meet learner needs. Issues related to each factor are shared and suggestions for resolutions are provided. Rating: 7/10-a good resource for introduction to factors and issues in adult learning via technology.

    1. The article emphasizes the term technology and pedagogy. The author explains learning environments, learning styles, how technology impacts pedagogy, and how technology is good for students. Rating: 5/5

    1. New technologies make it possible for students to tailor their course schedules, online classes, and brick-and- mortar learning venues to attain targeted degrees.

      With society and technology always changing. Learning new technology is key to getting ahead in higher education. Rate: 3/5

    1. Technology helps change the student/teacher roles and relationships: students take responsibility for their learning outcomes, while teachers become guides and facilitators. Technology lends itself as the multidimensional tool that assists that process.

      5) This article defines the importance of having technology in the classroom and how it is used to improve the skills/minds of students. It includes activities and other resources to assist the reader.

    1. Some of our adult-ed students take their courses virtually, with students checking in with teachers via Skype or by email, but a majority spend at least some time in a classroom.

      This article expresses how learning can be taught using the internet and one does not have to be in class to learn.

  5. Oct 2019
    1. ) Blockchain MemoryWe let LL be the blockchain mem-ory space, represented as the hastable L:{0,1}256→{0,1}NL:\{0,1\}^{256}\rightarrow \{0, 1\}^{N}, where N≫N \gg 256 and can store sufficiently-large documents. We assume this memory to be tamperproof under the same adversarial model used in Bitcoin and other blockchains. To intuitively explain why such a trusted data-store can be implemented on any blockchain (including Bitcoin), consider the following simplified, albeit inefficient, implementation: A blockchain is a sequence of timestamped transactions, where each transaction includes a variable number of output addresses (each address is a 160-bit number). LL could then be implemented as follows - the first two outputs in a transaction encode the 256-bit memory address pointer, as well as some auxiliary meta-data. The rest of the outputs construct the serialized document. When looking up L[k]L[k], only the most recent transaction is returned, which allows update and delete operations in addition to inserts.

      This paragraph explains how blockchain hides one's individual identity and privacy, while giving them a secure way of using the funds. In my opinion lot hacker ransomware are done using block-chain technology coins, this and one more paragraph here is really interesting to read about how blockchain helps protect personal data. and i also related this this hacking and corruption or money laundering

    1. BrainHQ, is an online brain-training software also developed by Posit Science. It is the only software available in Greek being used to any portable computing device (tablet, smartphone, etc.) as an application either on Android or on IOS provided in different languages. Undoubtedly, improvement of brain performance can bring multiple benefits to everyday life. Both research studies and the testimonials of users themselves show that BrainHQ offers benefits in improving thinking, memory and hearing, attention and vision, improving reaction speed, safer driving, self-confidence, quality discussion and good mood. BrainHQ includes 29 exercises divided into 6 categories: Attention, Speed, Memory, Skills, Intelligence and Navigation.

      In this conference paper the author is discussing about the different methods to interactively help learn people with disability, how their concentration and enthusiasm/motivation increases, if the right tool is used to teach them

  6. Sep 2019
    1. On social media, we are at the mercy of the platform. It crops our images the way it wants to. It puts our posts in the same, uniform grids. We are yet another profile contained in a platform with a million others, pushed around by the changing tides of a company's whims. Algorithms determine where our posts show up in people’s feeds and in what order, how someone swipes through our photos, where we can and can’t post a link. The company decides whether we're in violation of privacy laws for sharing content we created ourselves. It can ban or shut us down without notice or explanation. On social media, we are not in control.

      This is why I love personal web sites. They're your own, you do whatever you want with them, and you control them. Nothing is owned by others and you're completely free to do whatever you want.

      That's not the case with Facebook, Microsoft, Slack, Jira, whatever.

    1. From quill and ink, to the printing press and book formatting, to digital applications and platforms, annotation is - and always has been - tightly coupled to the technologies of the day.

      This makes me wonder at annotations in scrolls (and how pointers may have worked) prior to the invention and proliferation of codices as a literary form.

  7. Aug 2019
    1. public forum

      What about public forums like G2, Capterra, or Stackshare, how can these be leveraged to share government software insights? Could be framed as open ongoing RFI processes. We should be sharing with each other openly on these platforms. Hope it would at-least improved the level of interfaces / skin vendors put on the same "management" software.

    1. direct quote:"...respondents positively associate health, safety, and the environment with organic farmers compared to conventional and GMO farmers" (Sax and Doran 636). In support of MP#3, Organic farming is better

    1. Debate about online annotation technologies and practices will continue.

      I've added a few examples of abuse and conversation here in the past: https://indieweb.org/annotation#Annotation_Sites_Enable_Abuse

    1. m-health offers predominantly interconnectivity between patients and healthcare professionals while IoT devices offer the ability to collect information and perform procedures with increasingly minimal invasion. Finally, big data gives healthcare professionals an opportunity to spot trends and patterns for both individual patients and groups of patients, improving the speed of diagnosis and disease prevention. In the next section the third and final pillar of Health 4.0; design, is discussed

      Como as tecnologias interagem na Saúde 4.0

    1. But if you think about the ways kids under 15 using digital technology think about writing – you know, writing with text is just one way to write, and not even the most interesting way to write. The more interesting ways are increasingly to use images and sound and video to express ideas (in Koman 2005: n.p.)

      It is fascinating to the mind and this is why I can get caught up "playing around" with technology for hours but it's not satisfying to the soul. The endless possibilities of seeing, watching, reading, and remixing are captivating, and it makes me feel like I'm doing something, but at the end, did I really create anything? It's possible, but I have to remind myself of what I'm really doing online.

  8. Jul 2019
    1. canonical registers.

      The descriptor "canonical" has been very helpful for me to distinguish this data structure from others. Have had a few people think I am talking about something biblical, but it seems to stick. Helps distinguish it from data silos and align it with the other needed components of open standards and APIs.

    1. Further, Humphreys [23] observes that the stabilization that occursduring a technology’s maturation is temporary, and so possibilities for intepretive flexibility canresurface when the context surrounding a technology changes

      Thus the broader "context collapse" for users of Facebook as the platform matured and their surveillance capitalism came to the fore over their "connecting" priorities from earlier days.

  9. May 2019
    1. Use technology

      A pencil is a technology. So is a book. Like @bakerdoylek, I am curious about how the term is used, in this document and in others we read during this experience. In this context, I'm betting they refer to digital tools, possibly internet-based.

    2. modeling forlearners how to select theappropriate tool for their desireduse and skill lev

      I think part of this modeling means asking questions of the technology and talking through the responses to those questions with students. What are questions y'all ask of a technology before deciding to use it with students?

    1. he builds a trail of his interest through the maze of materials available

      Recording the trail we wander through this info seems to be a key feature of the Hypothesis annotation view we return to whenever we open the page.

    2. provide the individual with information-generating aid

      Interesting that there was apparently recognition of the importance of info creation as well as manipulation and consumption.

    3. concepts that we have never yet imagined

      Has this been achieved by people, or have algorithms taken on this task and automated this process beyond our ability to directly interact with these concepts?

    4. Both the language used by a culture, and the capability for effective intellectual activity are directly affected during their evolution by the means by which individuals control the external manipulation of symbols

      As it becomes easier for individuals to manipulate symbols, what happens?

    5. every composite process of the system decomposes ultimately into explicit-human and explicit-artifact processes

      But the increase in efficiency and effectiveness comes from improving the interface so that the relationship between the artifact and the human is easier to manage. A graphical user interface that requires less work on the user's part (even if it required more work for the system programmer) improves those synergies and emergent opportunities. There's an increased benefit when those interfaces can be proliferated widely.

    6. the development of "artificial intelligence" has been going on for centuries

      And the prior evidence is pretty strong for an "emergent" set of new insights and capabilities as these intellectual tools (artificial light, writing, printing, libraries, universities) proliferated.

    7. hope was to make a better match between existing human intelligence and the problems to be tackled

      This seems to echo back to that "aboriginal" example above, where our current seemingly enhanced intelligence derives quite a bit from a circumscribed set of "problems to be tackled" that no longer involve survival, but are more focused on things like making phone calls. Does it matter whether our external "intelligence amplifiers" actually deskill us as humans and make us more dependent on thought-labor-saving technology, as long as we don't lose access to it? Did writing put an end to a rich oral tradition in antiquity? Does Wikipedia and Google search make us more forgetful of "facts"?

    8. synergistic principle gives increased phenomenological sophistication to each succeedingly higher level of organization

      Emergent properties again -- is there an implication that a new (higher?) level of emergence may await?

    9. system is actively engaged in the continuous processes (among others) of developing comprehension within the individual and of solving problems; both processes are subject to human motivation, purpose, and will

      A working definition for education in the digital age?

    10. new innovation in one particular capability can have far-reaching effects throughout the rest of your capability hierarchy

      There's a sense here that some emergent new ability will be discovered once the difficulty of "routine" tasks diminishes.

    11. We find three general categories of process capabilities within a typical individual's repertoire. There are those that are executed completely within the human integument, which we call explicit-human process capabilities; there are those possessed by artifacts for executing processes without human intervention, which we call explicit-artifact process capabilities; and there are what we call the composite process capabilities, which are derived from hierarchies containing both of the other kinds.

      But they shade into each other. Is reading an explicit-human process? What about when a text-to-speech app reads to you? Is that composite? What about when an app keyword-searches a bunch of documents for you and returns only those with the info you want?

    12. even quite different higher order processes may have in common relatively high-order sub-processes

      This must be a useful insight for UI designers.

    13. Every process of thought or action is made up of sub-processes

      Does this focus on the pencil-stroke enhance or detract from the explanation of how to write a document? At what point does this granularity become a detriment?

    14. truly complex situations

      As others have noted here, the idea that the aborigine surviving by her own wits in the outback is tackling less complex situations than the white dude using a telephone seems a bit backwards. A more accurate statement might be that the aborigine does not have the necessary tools and information to build a telephone network. But that's the point, isn't it? That neither do WE. Being the beneficiaries of a technological patrimony and standing on the shoulders of giants doesn't actually make us superior to the aborigine. If anything, it might make us less adaptive and more brittle.

    15. In such a future working relationship between human problem-solver and computer 'clerk,' the capability of the computer for executing mathematical processes would be used whenever it was needed. However, the computer has many other capabilities for manipulating and displaying information that can be of significant benefit to the human in nonmathematical processes of planning, organizing, studying, etc. Every person who does his thinking with symbolized concepts (whether in the form of the English language, pictographs, formal logic, or mathematics) should be able to benefit significantly.

      This is an important suggestion that most thought is symbol manipulation and that computers could be built to assist with it, if not to do it themselves.

    16. considering the whole as a set of interacting components rather than by considering the components in isolation. 1a3

      Considering human supported by smartphone in similar terms as we once considered human supported by library.

    17. extensions of means developed and used in the past

      Do we tend to miss this point, that these new technologies are a continuation of earlier "means" that included language, narrative, writing, printing, libraries, etc.?

    18. a working station that has a visual display screen some three feet on a side; this is his working surface, and is controlled by a computer (his "clerk") with which he can communicate by means of a small keyboard and various other devices

      Here's an example of a state of the art workstation in 1962.

      Tektronix 4014.jpg<br>By The original uploader was Rees11 at English Wikipedia. - Transferred from <span class="plainlinks">en.wikipedia</span> to Commons., CC BY-SA 2.5, Link

    19. different planes here and there, curved surfaces occasionally

      Many new technologies were combined to realize this prescient sentence.

      WaltDisneyConcertHall.jpeg<br>By Jon Sullivan - PDPhoto, Public Domain, Link

    20. can be of significant benefit to the human in nonmathematical processes of planning, organizing, studying, etc.

      I'll be interested to see if this report is entirely Positivist, or if Engelbart recognizes the possibility of computing being weaponized in sectors like politics, economics, security and warfare.

    21. He is designing a building. He has already dreamed up several basic layouts and structural forms,

      I find it interesting how decades of using computers has led to "new methods of thinking and working that allow the human to capitalize upon the computer's help." With all the new technologies, I think the central intellectual development has been to reverse the sequence of design decisions Engelbart describes. Best practice these days is to start with "the people who will occupy this building, and the daily sequences of their activities."

    22. how would our education system change to take advantage of this new external symbol-manipulation capability of students and teachers (and administrators)?

      Let's say it's been twenty years since PDAs have been widely available. I returned to higher education less than ten years ago. K-12 seems to have embraced learning technologies, and their affordances, to improve primary and secondary education. In my experience, few educators with terminal degrees have made the effort while younger and more precarious teachers are slowly adopting educational technologies. Administrators are leading the way with their digital management systems and students are using proprietary social media platforms. Our institutions are doing what they were designed to do: resist change and reproduce the social order. Research paid for with public monies is as quickly privatized as that produced in corporations. Open education practices are just beginning to be explored.

      The first PDA, the Organizer, was released in 1984 by Psion, followed by Psion's Series 3, in 1991. The latter began to resemble the more familiar PDA style, including a full keyboard.[4][5] The term PDA was first used on January 7, 1992 by Apple Computer CEO John Sculley at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, referring to the Apple Newton.[6] In 1994, IBM introduced the first PDA with full telephone functionality, the IBM Simon, which can also be considered the first smartphone. Then in 1996, Nokia introduced a PDA with telephone functionality, the 9000 Communicator, which became the world's best-selling PDA. Another early entrant in this market was Palm, with a line of PDA products which began in March 1996. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_digital_assistant

    23. Other situations might admit changes requiring years of special training, very expensive equipment, or the use of special drugs.

      My reply to another post about historical context might be helpful. https://hyp.is/R07lQCldEem5RmPv1ywB5g/worrydream.com/Engelbart/

    1. Methodology The classic OSINT methodology you will find everywhere is strait-forward: Define requirements: What are you looking for? Retrieve data Analyze the information gathered Pivoting & Reporting: Either define new requirements by pivoting on data just gathered or end the investigation and write the report.

      Etienne's blog! Amazing resource for OSINT; particularly focused on technical attacks.

  10. Apr 2019
    1. The technology stack for web applications mentioned here are not the only ones that you have to choose from. We have tried to bring you the best of the technology stacks for web development that are prevailing in 2019.

      The technology stack for web applications mentioned here are not the only ones that you have to choose from. We have tried to bring you the best of the technology stacks for web development that are prevailing in 2019.

    1. Similar to the technical architecture of classic colonialism, digital colonialism is rooted in the design of the tech ecosystem for the purposes of profit and plunder. If the railways and maritime trade routes were the "open veins" of the Global South back then, today, digital infrastructure takes on the same role: Big Tech corporations use proprietary software, corporate clouds, and centralised Internet services to spy on users, process their data, and spit back manufactured services to subjects of their data fiefdoms.

      Yikes

    1. The underlying guiding idea of a “trustworthy AI” is, first and foremost, conceptual nonsense. Machines are not trustworthy; only humans can be trustworthy (or untrustworthy). If, in the future, an untrustworthy corporation or government behaves unethically and possesses good, robust AI technology, this will enable more effective unethical behaviour.

      yikes

    1. Ashley Norris is the Chief Academic Officer at ProctorU, an organization that provides online exam proctoring for schools. This article has an interesting overview of the negative side of technology advancements and what that has meant for student's ability to cheat. While the article does culminate as an ad, of sorts, for ProctorU, it is an interesting read and sparks thoughts on ProctorU's use of both human monitors for testing but also their integration of Artificial Intelligence into the process.

      Rating: 9/10.

    1. The article, published in Cornell University's React publication, is an overview of technology that is currently being used in the classroom. There is an overview of interactive abilities using these technologies and a conclusion that technology should always be used to enhance and not replace.

      Rating: 6/10. Short.

    1. This article is a breakdown from the U.S. Department of Education around the types of learning environments that exist in the technology arena. It provides examples of schools fulfilling these different environments and offers a collection fo additional resources.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. The author, Susan Grajek, formerly of Yale University is the Vice President for Communities and Research at EDUCAUSE. Grajek brings together 5 leaders in higher education and technology to discuss the future of technology in the higher education arena. The article addresses the progress that needs to be made, especially in the adult education portion of higher eduction and acknowledges that the traditional 18-22 college student population is very small and that there is so much more of the market that needs to be reached.

      Rating: 9/10.

    1. This journal article, written by Amaury Nora, who is currently the Dean for Research at the University of Texas San Antonio and Blanca Plazas Snyder who was pursuing a degree in educational psychology at the time this article as written. The author's bring an honest review of technology and include the benefits, the downfalls and they identify areas where more research needs to be conducted (especially around student persistence).

      Rating: 9/10. The article is informative and takes many perspectives. The only flaw is that when discussing technology in Higher Education, this article is from 2008, but it was also helpful to get the perspective from 10 years ago.

  11. Mar 2019
    1. This paper addresses the question about how today’s modern schools can prepare learners for the future in the age of technology. The response to this question is discussion around innovative learning environments that involve the use of technology. Technology has been a concern for the rapid change in the educational landscape and this paper aims to highlight transformation and innovation in relation to technology for teaching and learning. 9/10 for helpful diagrams and tables.

    1. This paper discusses the idea that design is responsible for developing learning and teaching in technology rich environments. This paper argues Cultural Historical Activity Theory. This paper uses this perspective to discuss their ideas of design in connection with the digital age. This paper is written from the perspective German, Nordic, Russian and Vygotskyan concepts that seek to define the relationship between learning and teaching in relation to design. Rating 9/10 for mixing design with digital learning

    1. This article is about technology integration in the classroom and how to support teachers and schools during the process. It provides recommendations on how to handle distractions and the level of engagement that should be happening between peers. This article takes a deep dive into learning in general and how it prepares students for the real world. Rating: 7/10

    1. At a recent keynote speech (2016), Richard Culatta, former director of the Office of Educational Technology for the US Department of Education, noted that more than half of higher education enrollments for 2016 are nontraditional students.

      Reinventing higher education is essential for diverse learners. A study in 2016 found that more than half of higher education students are "nontraditional students." Meaning they need special accommodations. One essential accommodation of online learning is that students can watch or reread content multiple times if needed. This is in contrast to a traditional classroom where the lecture can only be heard once. Also, while text only information is not for everyone, it is still essential to blind students. But, alternatives such as slide shows must also be present. To add in more technology one must involve administration, staff and faculty before jumping in too quickly.

      Rating 6/10