607 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. PAY $1 OR MORE TO ALSO UNLOCK!

      Star Wars Vs. Star Trek

      Everything Everyday Math Book

      Everything Guide to Pre-Algebra

      100 Things to See in the Night Sky

      Simple Acts to Save Our Planet

      Weather 101

      1,001 Facts That Will Scare the S#*t Out of You

      Why Didn't I Think of That?

      What's Your STEM?

      Dad's Book of Awesome Science Experiments

      Psych 101


      PAY $8 OR MORE TO ALSO UNLOCK!

      Everything Guide to Algebra

      Math Geek

      Anatomy 101

      Physics of Star Wars

      Facts From Space!

      100 Things to See in the Southern Night Sky

      Everything STEM Handbook

      Architecture 101

      Nature is the Worst

      Ultimate Roblox Book: An Unofficial Guide

      The Everything Astronomy Book

      Everything Psychology


      PAY $15 OR MORE TO ALSO UNLOCK!

      Psych Experiments https://www.amazon.com/Psych-Experiments-Rorschachs-psychologys-fascinating-ebook/dp/B01M3R7RVN/ 4.6/5 $12/$11

      DNA is You! https://www.amazon.com/DNA-You-Marvelous-One-Kind-ness/dp/1721400176/ 3.8/5 $11/$14 Want: 8/10

      Everything Guide to the Human Brain https://www.amazon.com/Everything-Guide-Human-Brain-Everything%C2%AE-ebook/dp/B00CMVFW62/ 4.3/10 $14/$13 Want: 8/10

      Astronomy 101 https://www.amazon.com/Astronomy-101-Wormholes-Theories-Discoveries-ebook/dp/B00DV1V7LQ/ 4.5/5 $9/$11 Want: 7/10

      Everyday Amazing https://www.amazon.com/Everyday-Amazing-Fascinating-Science-Surrounds-ebook/dp/B07M5VB9FW/ 4.6/5 $15/$13 Want: 7/10

      Everything Kids' Scratch Coding Book https://www.amazon.com/Everything-Kids-Scratch-Coding-Book/dp/1507207972/ 4.4/5 $14/$15 Want: 6/10

      In the Company of Trees https://www.amazon.com/Company-Trees-Honoring-Connection-Sacred/dp/1507209541/ 5/5 $13/$15 Want: 9/10

      Science of Marvel https://www.amazon.com/Science-Marvel-Infinity-Stones-Revealed/dp/1507209983/ 4.6/5 $13/$11 Want: 7/10

      Bizarre World https://www.amazon.com/Bizarre-World-Collection-Creepiest-Traditions-ebook/dp/B07MKDH8XY/ 5/5 $9/$10 Want: 8/10

      Statistics 101 https://www.amazon.com/Statistics-101-Distribution-Determining-Probability-ebook/dp/B078M5FZ1P/ 3.4/5 $11/$10 Want: 3/10

      Everything Guide to Anatomy and Physiology https://www.amazon.com/Everything-Guide-Anatomy-Physiology-Everything%C2%AE-ebook/dp/B00XO0PZAS/ 4.6/5 $16/21 Want: 7/10

      Advanced Roblox Coding Book: An Unofficial Guide https://www.amazon.com/Advanced-Roblox-Coding-Book-Unofficial-ebook/dp/B07GNVRPXW/ 4.6/5 $11/$10 Want: 5/10

      Genetics 101 https://www.amazon.com/Genetics-101-Chromosomes-Cloning-Everything-ebook/dp/B078M5KLXB/ 4.1/5 $11/$10 Needs pictures Want: 5/10

  2. May 2020
    1. This fall needs to be different. We need to ask students to be part of the solution of keeping learning flourishing in the fall. This includes asking them to help manage the class if it has a virtual component.

      This is moving education in exactly the WRONG direction. Students are already ill-prepared to do the actual work and studying of education, now we're going to try to extract extra efficiency out of the system by asking them to essential teach themselves on top of it? This statement seems like the kind of thing a technology CEO would pitch higher education on as a means of monetizing something over which they had no control solely to extract value for their own company.

      If we're going to go this far, why not just re-institute slavery?

    1. We’ve certainly dabbled in the debate of “what is a tech company” but what we never addressed was why do companies do mental gymnastics to call themselves a tech company. It’s because venture as an asset class traditionally invested in technology because that is what presented the growth and return characteristics that matched their risk profile. So you try to call a desk rental or mattress seller a tech company.
  3. Apr 2020
  4. Mar 2020
    1. Resources for Closing the Digital Divide

      This website hosts numerous resources to aid educators in their attempt to close the digital divide that alienates a certain socio-economic demographic of students and limits their ability to succeed in school. The website first lists hyperlinked articles to help educators understand the state of the digital divide, then lists hyperlinked articles and resources to help take action to improve the digital divide and close digital learning gaps before supplying links to articles and resources that can help instructors develop media and digital literacy within their respective classrooms. This would be an incredibly helpful website for any instructor who is looking for background information on and resources by which to close the digital divide. Rating: 9/10

    1. Emerging Theories of Learning and the Role of Technology

      This article discusses the social changes introduced by new technologies and how educational environments are trying to prepare students to enter a technologically advanced workforce through integration of technology with curriculum. The author challenges traditional theories of learning by discussing how cognition is situated in the digital, 21st-century learner, and that technology integration should focus on the importance of community within learning environments. Although the article challenges the traditional ideas of technology integration, it fails to provide actionable ways in which educators could infuse technology into their own curriculum. Rating: 6/10

    1. Technology Integration: Connections to Educational Theories

      This article, written by five instructors at the Ohio State University at Mansfield (OSU-M), explores the ways in which OSU-M has integrated technology into their curriculum as well as the pedagogical reasons behind the integration. The article begins with a background introduction into the campus of OSU-M and its student population before explaining the required technology courses students in their teacher education program experience based on ISTE standards. Next, the article outlines six criteria the university used to develop its technology curriculum and discusses their use of developmentally appropriate practice, integrated curriculum, literature-based instruction, classroom-based inquiry, and diversity and equity. This article could serve as a practical, although dated, model by which adult educators could begin to construct a method of integrating technology into their curriculum. Ranking: 4/10

    1. At the Intersection of Technology and Pedagogy: considering styles of learning and teaching

      In this article, Gibson analyzes the use of educational technology through the lens of learning styles of students as well as through learning environments, including those that are teacher-centric and those that are student-centric. The article also discusses the differences between technologies that simply make the work already being done in classes easier to do and those technologies that fundamentally challenge pedagogy to evolve towards a more constructivist ideology.The author further explores external social and political pressures to increase technology integration in the classroom, but warns that not all integration is constructive integration. Although the article discusses many approaches to technology integration, it fails to include concrete steps that educators might take to include technology into their curriculum. Rating: 6/10

    1. Research in Educational Technology

      This textbook, published by the Oklahoma State University Library ePress, contains a chapter which summarizes the main views of knowledge in educational technology research, including postpositivism, constructivism, advocacy, and pragmatism, as well as each view's research traditions. The chapter suggests an approach to evaluating research articles through the lenses of a consistent learning theory coupled, methodologies that support that learning theory, and the conclusions that are drawn by the researchers supported through their methodologies. This chapter would help educators evaluate how and why they might include technology into their course curriculum. Rating: 7/10

    1. Technology Integration in Schools

      This article focuses on the lack of technology integration by K-12 educators into the curriculum itself based on the evaluation of the amount of access to educational technologies by both teachers and students, how often these technologies are used for instructional purposes, and how that technology is used to facilitate learning by students. The article goes on to discuss ways in which access to educational technology has been increased through one-to-one computing initiatives which has produced mixed results and open educational resources which suggests that educators produce learning materials without compensation. Next, the article suggests ways to increase instructional technology use through professional development in which teacher skills are developed using technology, collaborative environments used to increase holistic teacher engagement, and mentoring to improve teachers' attitudes towards technology implementation. Finally, the article discusses ethical issues surrounding technology use including academic dishonesty, accessibility, and ethical use behaviors.The author concludes with a set of needs in order to bring about effective use of educational technology which include pedagogically sound practices, personalized instruction, assessment, and change at the systemic level. This article provides a very well-rounded view of the challenges and affordances that educators face when considering how to integrate technology into their curriculum. Rating: 8/10

    1. Characteristics of Adult Learners With Implications for Online Learning Design

      To view this article, click "Full text." This article first discusses characteristics of adult learners before addressing the ways in which online learning design should be influenced by the adult learning theories of andragogy, self-directed learning, experiential learning, and transformative learning. By comparing the characteristics of adult learners and the ways in which the theories do or do not address those theories, the author suggests ways in which the characteristics of an adult learner should be used to develop a more holistic approach to developing online learning environments. Although the author doesn't include practical application, it is one of the few articles that expresses a need to combine multiple theories into one design approach. Ranking: 6/10

    1. Handbook of Adult and Continuing Education

      Although only a preview of this textbook is available for free, the amount of historical research included is incredible. The chapters cover a diverse range of topics that are still being discussed today and demonstrate the ideological underpinnings of many modern issues. Published in 2000, the conversation about technology integration in adult learning has moved far beyond the scope of this book, but it could certainly serve as an underpinning of many of the issues that are still being discussed and developed upon today. Ranking: 5/10

    1. Integrating Technology into the Classroom: Eight Keys to Success

      To view this article, click "Full text." This article focuses on the author's perspective of the primary concern in technology integration in educational environments - the instructor. The authors discuss the eight barriers that teachers create when trying to integrate technology: fear of change, training, personal use, teaching models, learning theories, educational climate, motivation, and support. Although the advice is practical, it is extremely rudimentary, created eighteen years ago, and does not address the more modern concerns of integration of technology in adult educational environments. Ranking: 3/10

    1. A Paradigm Shift: Technology Integration for Higher Education in the New Millennium

      To view this article, click "full text." The article discusses a paradigm shift for educational technology at a time when distance learning first started growing across the United States. Initially, institutions of higher learning were driven by technology integration standard mandates as well as competition from other institutions, but eventually the shift normalized with federal funding. The author discusses barriers to technology adaptation, focused on teacher training, before describing characteristics of the distance learner and distance teacher. Although the article may have been relevant for its time, twenty years later it serves more as a grounding article for when educational technology first began to take rise, the considerations and limitations that were addressed, and the way that technology integration in classrooms has still not realized the potential envisioned by its early adopters. Rating: 4/10

    1. Integrating Technology in the Adult Education Classroom

      This website offers an online course regarding the purposes, guidelines, and implementation of integrating technology into adult learning environments. Additionally, the course offers examples of ways to integrate that technology. Rank: 7/10

    1. Resources for Technology Integration

      This webpage hosts numerous links to help educators understand the current challenges and successes of technology integration into the educational environment. Additionally, there are resources broken down by grade level and a list of additional resources on the internet for a wide range of general and specialized learning environments.

    1. Resources for Technology Integration

      This webpage offers a wealth of links to understanding current elements of technology integration into various classrooms, links to the Center for Applied Research in Educational Technology, as well as a link to resources for technology integration which provides useful tools that teachers can begin to deploy immediately. Ranking: 9/10

    1. ISTE Standards Transform learning and teaching.  

      This section of the ISTE website offers paid resources that educators can access to improve their own understanding of the ISTE standards as well as practical ways to implement those standards in their classroom integration of technology. Rating: 6/10

  5. Feb 2020
    1. The results of the questionnaire indicated that West Town students had greater access to the Internet at home and were required to use the Internet more in school. These results suggest that a separate and independent achievement gap existed for online reading, based on income inequality.

      The achievement gap is multifaceted, so as educators, we need to attack it in more ways. Getting children library cards (internet access) and technology experiences from a younger age can help close this gap, but only if it is in a equitable way.

    1. The most popular modern secure messaging tool is Signal, which won the Levchin Prize at Real World Cryptography for its cryptographic privacy design. Signal currently requires phone numbers for all its users. It does this not because Signal wants to collect contact information for its users, but rather because Signal is allergic to it: using phone numbers means Signal can piggyback on the contact lists users already have, rather than storing those lists on its servers. A core design goal of the most important secure messenger is to avoid keeping a record of who’s talking to whom. Not every modern secure messenger is as conscientious as Signal. But they’re all better than Internet email, which doesn’t just collect metadata, but actively broadcasts it. Email on the Internet is a collaboration between many different providers; and each hop on its store-and-forward is another point at which metadata is logged. .
    1. Desk Set (1957) is a delightful Tracy-Hepburn comedy about automation and information technology. 

      Love this one. Never thought of it as future forward before, but certainly is!

    1. correspondence to the instructor and to other students, what technology should be used to communicate, and what kinds of questions might be asked (and how frequently). Similarly, multilingual students may have different cultural con-ventions governing their understanding of such issues as plagiarism

      some concerns that may need to be addressed

    2. f a student has difficulty understanding written instructions, oral and/or video in-struction might provide more clarity.
    3. should think broadly about the kinds of technolo-gies they might allow students to use in an OWC

      slow responses can be because a writer is trying to come up with the right words, but can also be technology-related. writers on their phones will have a much harder time navigating WCONLINE. but if that's all a writer has, we can't tell them not to use it. how do we support them?

    4. links to videos or online help guides

      locate instructional resources for writers to help familiarize them with expectations and practical methods for writing in academic contexts -- e.g. Purdue OWL video series on MLA formatting

    5. onsider the kinds of technologies their students might already be familiar with, or they can leave open the technologies students can use to accomplish various writing tasks (if appropriate) to draw upon students’ current literacy practices.

      consider identifying and testing out technologies that would support students' linguistic needs

  6. Jan 2020
    1. "It's not interactive, ... there's one screen, and you just have to read it," he explained. "It's the same as reading a [paper] page."

      sometimes tech isn't much of an improvement >> we need to channel to the special abilities of growing tech -hashtags, hyperlinks, interactive games and level checks, etc.

    1. technology diffused more easily along lines of latitude than along lines of longitude because climate changed more rapidly along lines of longitude making it more difficult for both humans and technologies to adapt

      Technology adapts better across latitude than longitude

    2. Anything that’s invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty-five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it.

      Before 15 it's just a part of our world creation, after 35 it's the natural order of things

  7. Dec 2019
    1. the first rule of technology: What can be done will be done—until people realize what shouldn't be done. Example one: nuclear power.
  • Tags

    Annotators

    URL

  • Nov 2019
    1. In the case of library users, there is a strong tie between technology and library use. For instance, the technology-rich profiles of Information Omnivores might suggest that their gadgets could provide all the media and data they could possibly need—yet they still patronize libraries at high levels.

      I thought this particular detail was rather illuminating. A common belief is that technology will eventually make the library obsolete. Yet, the correlation between high technology use and high library use runs counter to this belief. It is stated later, on page 3, that the highest engagement groups share a love for books, traditional paper books. They also have the highest technology use. To me, this suggests that the library should not disregard, even in the day-and-age of smartphones, their book collection. This is still the primary draw to the library for their high engagement groups and even to medium engagement groups like the Print Traditionalists. I think this is an encouraging note; people still like books and people still like to get books from the library, despite having pocket computers. But, librarians can't disregard technology either. After reading this study, I think the appropriate way for librarians to understand technology is not as a hostile take-over, but similar to how the people of this study found it to be. Technology is an "add on," a supplement to information resources. The library should provide access to books AND a wide array of relevant digital and technology resources.