4 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2020
    1. PLNs offer new spaces in which teachers may learn and grow as professionals with support from a diverse network ofpeople and resources. With recent advances in technology and widespread access to the Internet, teachers can expand theirweb of connections beyond their face-to-face networks, seek help and emotional support, and aggregate vast quantities ofprofessional knowledge at anytime and from anywhere (Hur&Brush, 2009;Trust, 2012; 2013). PLNs can also be differen-tiated from online communities, networks of practice (Brown&Duguid, 2000), and social media sites. Online communitiesare groups of people who connect for a shared purpose, while a network refers to a,“set of nodes and links with affordancesfor learning”(Wenger, Trayner,&de Laat, 2011, p. 9). Social media sites are digital tools that people can use to connect andcommunicate with others. Each of these terms refers to a single medium for connecting with others. PLNs are broader,multifaceted systems, that often incorporate multiple communities, networks of practice, and sites that support both on- andoff-line learning. Researchers have yet to explore PLNs as complex systems of people, resources, and digital tools.

      Helpful contrast of PLNs with online communities, networks of practice, and social media sites from Trust, T., Krutka, D. G., & Carpenter, J. P. (2016). “Together we are better”: Professional learning networks for teachers. Computers & Education, 102, 15–34. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2016.06.007

    2. Many researchers and educators have attempted to define and envision the purpose of PLNs for teachers (e.g.,Couros,2010; Flanigan, 2011; Powerful Learning Practice, 2012;Trust, 2012), but there is no agreed-upon definition. PLNs havebeen described as“reciprocal learning system[s]”(Powerful Learning Practice, 2012, p. 8),“vibrant, ever-changing group[s] ofconnections,”(Crowley, 2014; para. 4),“network[s] of fellow educators and resources”(Catapano, n. d.),“the sum of all socialcapital and connections”(Couros, 2010), and“online communities that allow the sharing of lesson plans, teaching strategies,and student work, as well as collaboration across grade levels and departments”(Flanigan, 2011). Various scholars, authors,and educators conceive of PLNs in unique, and somewhat disparate ways. Prior to this study, researchers had yet to examinehow teachers themselves defined and described their PLNs. Understanding how educators conceive of and utilize PLNs mayhelp bring more clarity to the construct.

      Helpful overview paragraph related to variety of PLN definitions from Trust, T., Krutka, D. G., & Carpenter, J. P. (2016). “Together we are better”: Professional learning networks for teachers. Computers & Education, 102, 15–34. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2016.06.007

    1. Over the past several years I’ve written a broad number of pieces about the IndieWeb. I find that many people are now actively searching for, reading, and implementing various versions of what I’ve done, particularly on the WordPress Platform.

      A reminder to review Chris Aldrich's collection of articles, tutorials, presentations and podcasts. I've modeled my Wordpress site after his to better appreciate how I can use Indieweb technologies.

    2. Create an IFTTT.com recipe to port your Hypothesis RSS feed into WordPress posts. Generally chose an “If RSS, then WordPress” setup and use the following data to build the recipe: Input feed: https://hypothes.is/stream.atom?user=username (change username to your user name) Optional title: 📑 {{EntryTitle}} Body: {{EntryContent}} from {{EntryUrl}} <br />{{EntryPublished}} Categories: Highlight (use whatever categories you prefer, but be aware they’ll apply to all your future posts from this feed) Tags: hypothes.is Post status (optional): I set mine to “Draft” so I have the option to keep it privately or to publish it publicly at a later date.

      This is my first attempt to get Hypothes.is highlights and annotations to display on my WordPress blog.