320 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2019
    1. Ideally, an open pedagogy project explicitly welcomes future participation and adaptation (Robbins, “Guidelines”).

      Timothy Robbins emphasizes this goal in his guidelines for contributors to the latest Rebus Community iteration of the Open Anthology of Earlier American Literature. In a distillation I find particularly elegant, he notes: "In its best iteration, “open pedagogy” entails the spread of access to knowledge with an invitation to participate in the re-creation of new knowledge" ("Guidelines: Section Introductions.") 

    1. Research advances in learning and teaching over the past few decades provide a way to meet these challenges. These advances have established expertise in university teaching: a set of skills and knowledge that consistently achieve better learning outcomes than the traditional and still predominant teaching methods practiced by most faculty. Widespread recognition and adoption of these expert practices will profoundly change the nature of university teaching and have a large beneficial impact on higher education.

      Carl Wieman paper on evidence based learning implementation in the disciplines

  2. Sep 2019
    1. When assignments are optional, compliance will vary and you risk exacerbating differences in study skills, background knowledge, and the like.

      I can't help but wonder if the emphasis on "content retention" and "compliance" that seems to be core to the authors' concept of learning doesn't make some bad assumptions: that learning is something that an instructor does to a student, and not something that students have agency over. This seems to me to be in extreme conflict with what might be even more inclusive practice: far less emphasis on the grade, more individual attention and greater emphasis on personal growth, less teacher control and more student agency. This is basic Freire stuff. Students aren't vessels to be filled.

    2. Reach out to those who didn’t do so well and express your willingness to help them. Check in with students who have missed a class or two.

      It's worth noting that none of this is easy or efficient. If it was, we'd all do it. One must make a concerted effort to ensure students feel like they belong and that they're supported so that they can learn best. If that's not part of an instructor's job, then what exactly is the instructor's job?

    3. Think-pair-share

      They're used to death, but for good reason. There are few things better than a good TPS for getting students warmed up for discussion. One can even allow the TPS to inform the entire lesson: if the TPS results in a class-generated set of questions or learning objectives, teach from that, or plan to teach from it in the next class session.

    4. minimize inequities

      minimize inequities = reduce harm; clear similarities to Hippocratic oath. See also Kaufman & Schipper (2018) Teaching With Compassion, p. xxiii

    5. Traditional teaching methods do not serve all students well.

      Emphasis on all. Frequently defensiveness kicks in when traditional teaching is called into question, because it does work, but just for some.

    6. The more structure, the better for all students. 
    7. set clear expectations — and avoid unnecessary stress and miscommunication

      minimize student anxiety w these 5 tips

    1. Supporting Personalised Learning Frequently mentioned throughout the interviews was the goal of allowing learners to explore their personal interests, culture and social context through assessment. Several participants sought to design assessment that allowed learners to tap into these aspects of their personal lives. Where learners could exercise choice and pursue projects of personal interest, a greater sense of ownership was observed. James commented that “they love the idea that they are in control of what they do”, when given more choice around assessment. Other participants suggested it was possible to have learners working on projects that could benefit their personal lives or professional trajectories as part of formal coursework. In her final assignment, Olivia provides the learners “absolute free reign in terms of what kind of a thing they produced.” Learners use their creative interests to develop resources for the course, as Olivia reflects “some opted for essays still, but other students created digital timelines, infographics, podcasts, comic books, videos.” Personalisation of assessment was suggested to allow learners to represent and situate themselves authentically and creatively through their work.

      Giving learners more autonomy in their learning is a great pedagogical principle, and in the context of the article focusing on learning design, I can see how this fits with "open" as it does require that the course design needs to be more "open" as in flexible to allow for this kind of learner autonomy. There is overlap here between authentic learning and open pedagogy.

    1. Some researchers have referred to this type of learning arrangement as anchored discussion.23 When students “talk” with one another about a shared text through digital annotation, evidence suggests.d-undefined, .lh-undefined { background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2) !important; }.d-undefined, .lh-undefined { background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5) !important; }3Lauren Zucker, Jeffrey Pomerantz, Maha Bali annotation affords richer conversation as students pay closer attention to the text, establish more proximal connections between their discussion and the source material, and embrace opportunities to elaborate their ideas, clarify, and learn from the viewpoints of their peers.
    2. After all, Harry Potter wouldn’t have completed his Potions course were it not for an annotated version of the Advanced Potion-Making textbook.

      One also has to question for pedagogy’s sake why the new professor of the course continued the adoption of that text which was patently “off” in its recipes to the point that a student who had the corrections and better descriptions (via those annotations) excelled while others were only passable?

  3. Aug 2019
    1. Its aim is producing students who can think critically, be considerate of others, take risks, think dangerously and imagine a future that extends and deepens what it means to be an engaged citizen capable of living in a substantive democracy.

      What does Giroux's "be considerate of others" look and feel like in practice? How is it related to the problematic calls for civility?

  4. Jul 2019
    1. Freire pedagogy was a political and performative act organized around the ‘instructive ambivalence of disrupted borders’ (cited in Bhabha, 1994, p. 28), a practice of bafflement, interruption, understanding, and intervention that is the result of ongoing historical, social, and economic struggles

      Further articulation of Freire's vision of pedagogy. I'm interested in what "bafflement" looks like in this context. An openness to being surprised? A kind of Socratic ignorance? A beginner's mind?

    1. he yellowkitchen where she used to share her lunch with studentsin need of various forms of sustenance

      A compelling image that captures hooks' vision of engaged pedagogy.

    2. Agendas had to be flexible, had to allow for spon­taneous shifts in direction.

      I found spontaneity to be one of the hardest things to grow comfortable with as a teacher. I think that's the case because I rarely ever witnessed spontaneity as a student, and if I did, I doubt I knew what had just occurred was, in fact, unplanned. I think the more teachers can make their pedagogy transparent to students, the better both groups can understand why and how to create more opportunities for the kind of excitement hooks is describing.

    1. Institutions, publics, and some media elites are encouraging academics to be more visible in the public sphere.

      I can't help but be reminded of the early professoriate in the 1400's when teachers were expected to be well known or interesting enough to have their own local following and pull in their own individual students. If they weren't the right sort of thought leaders or didn't teach the "right" subjects, they failed as teachers and were kicked out of the university. Social media in this era would have been more interesting whereas, now it barely seems to be a direct economic factor. (cross reference O. Gingerich, The Book Nobody Read)

    1. "We learn by engaging and sharing with others, and a digital environment enables you to do that in a much more effective way."

      An interesting pedagogical point, but then the question becomes: "Should we necessarily do it within your company's specific siloed domain?"

    1. “you have to buy the class, basically pay for the class […] you had to pay, there’s no way to go around it.”

      Which again raises the question of pedagogy. The practice also creates a classroom environment based at least in part on begrudging compliance and resentment. Not great!

    2. My professor shows us slides, but, um, the book is not used at all

      The student's description of the course reminds me that conversations about OER go hand-in-hand with conversations about pedagogy. How does adopting and (co)creating OER texts affect the how's and why's of teaching and learning? And for instructors (and students) new to OER, how can they receive support before, during, and after the use/creation of an OER text?

  5. Jun 2019
    1. Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences should not be conflated with the idea of "learning styles". Most people benefit from multiple modes of learning.

    1. There is no lesson plan or outline we must read in order to enact an educational experience; instead, the website lets us have an educational experience right away and then lends itself to a series of follow-up questions, exercises, and reflective practices. Otherwise put, the website actively facilitates a pedagogical experience rather than providing access to pedagogical documents. There is no set up required.

      This is an interesting comment. I'm struck by the notion that the site enacts the learning process rather than provides materials. I'm also wondering how this might fit into the "open education" ethos.

    1. On one hand, DH pedagogy can no longer be meaningfully said to be entirely in service of or secondary to the research project.

      !!!

      Yes! How does DH end up caught in the trap of focusing solely on research? I'm loving the notion of more attention to DH pedagogy separate from the research discussion

  6. Apr 2019
    1. Andrews, P., & Hatch, G. (2001). Hungary and its characteristic pedagogical flow. Proceedings of the British Congress of Mathematics Education, 21(2). 26-40. Stockton, J. C. (2010). Education of Mathematically Talented Students in Hungary. Journal of Mathematics Education at Teachers College, 1(2), 1-6.

      references to read

    2. Moreover, the teacher repeatedly asks, “Did anyone get a different answer?” or “Did anyone use a different method?” to elicit multiple solutions strategies. This highlights the connections between different problems, concepts, and areas of mathematics and helps develop students’ mathematical creativity. Creativity is further fostered through acknowledging “good mistakes.” Students who make an error are often commended for the progress they made and how their work contributed to the discussion and to the collective understanding of the class.
    1. I find it somewhat interesting to note that with 246 public annotations on this page using Hypothes.is, that from what I can tell as of 4/2/2019 only one of them is a simple highlight. All the rest are highlights with an annotation or response of some sort.

      It makes me curious to know what the percentage distribution these two types have on the platform. Is it the case that in classroom settings, which many of these annotations appear to have been made, that much of the use of the platform dictates more annotations (versus simple highlights) due to the performative nature of the process?

      Is it possible that there are a significant number of highlights which are simply hidden because the platform automatically defaults these to private? Is the friction of making highlights so high that people don't bother?

      I know that Amazon will indicate heavily highlighted passages in e-books as a feature to draw attention to the interest relating to those passages. Perhaps it would be useful/nice if Hypothes.is would do something similar, but make the author of the highlights anonymous? (From a privacy perspective, this may not work well on articles with a small number of annotators as the presumption could be that the "private" highlights would most likely be directly attributed to those who also made public annotations.

      Perhaps the better solution is to default highlights to public and provide friction-free UI to make them private?

      A heavily highlighted section by a broad community can be a valuable thing, but surfacing it can be a difficult thing to do.

  7. Mar 2019
    1. Teaching Adults:What Every Trainer Needs to Know About Adult Learning Styles

      This paper, a project o the PACER Center, discusses learning styles specifically as they pertain to adult learners. From the nitty-gritty podagogy vs. andragogy to the best ways to train for adults, this is a good tool for those who don't know much or need a refresher on adult learning theory and training adults. I love that it is set up in a textbook style, so it's friendly but has a considerable amount of information in a variety of formats. The section, "Tips for Teaching Adults" is helpful to me as it's a series of quick reminders about how to present my information best. 8/10

    1. Adult Learning Theory

      This article by the University of Utah discusses Lindeman's and Knowles's theories on adult learning. Andragogy uses the teacher differently from pedagogy: the teacher in an adult learning environment becomes a facilitator instead of the knower. I think this is an important distinction to make for people who go from teaching children to teaching adults. There are two of these people on my team at work. One taught third grade and one taught sixth grade, and both of them tend to try to put the instructor in the knower's position instead of the facilitator's position. They have to catch themselves often and rework some instruction to be more student-focused instead of content-focused. 8/10

  8. Feb 2019
    1. to expand their pedagogical repertoire

      Indeed. Just as it requires knowledge and skill to design, develop, and deliver an online learning experience, the same applies to blended learning. Making informed decisions about how to blend is deep, deep, deep.

    1. A teacher with deep pedagogical knowledge understands how students construct knowledge and acquire skills and how they develop habits of mind and positive dispositions toward learning

      (Maybe use this quote). Understanding students and how they learn helps us to incorporate technology and teach content so that they can get a full understanding of what we are trying to teach.

    2. Pedagogical knowledge (PK) is teachers’ deep knowledge about the processes and practices or methods of teaching and learning. They encompass, among other things, overall educational purposes, values, and aims. This generic form of knowledge applies to understanding how students learn, general classroom management skills, lesson planning, and student assessment

      This is what we learn in "teacher school". This is why we learn about many different ways of teaching and why the education system is set up the way that it is. Pedagogy is probably the most important aspect of lesson planning because it shows that we have an understanding of not only making content interesting to our students but managing behavior and assessing if they understand the information, all at the same time.

    3. Equally important to the model are the interactions between and among these bodies of knowledge, represented as PCK, TCK (technological content knowledge), TPK (technological pedagogicalknowledge), and TPACK

      The interaction of all three areas is important because it will help us to understand technology when it comes to lesson planning and content knowledge. Knowing what types of technology to use based on our pedagogical methods and the content that we are teaching our students will help us to implement them to ensure full understanding from our students.

    1. Ideally, an open pedagogy project explicitly welcomes future participation and adaptation (Robbins, “Guidelines”).

      Timothy Robbins emphasizes this goal in his guidelines for contributors to the latest Rebus Community iteration of the Open Anthology of Earlier American Literature. In a distillation I find particularly elegant, he notes: "In its best iteration, “open pedagogy” entails the spread of access to knowledge with an invitation to participate in the re-creation of new knowledge" ("Guidelines: Section Introductions.") 

    2. it is also the process of designing architectures and using tools for learning that enable students to shape the public knowledge commons of which they are a part

      Rajiv Jhangiani connects this point both to the 2008 Cape Town Open Education Declaration's outline of open pedagogy and to UNESCO's UNESCO’s Education for Sustainable Development Goals (or ESD), which he excerpts in more detail in his presentation:

      “ESD does not only integrate contents such as climate change, poverty and sustainable consumption into the curriculum… It asks for an action-oriented, transformative pedagogy, which supports self-directed learning, participation and collaboration, problem-orientation, inter- and transdisciplinarity and the linking of formal and informal learning. Only such pedagogical approaches make possible the development of the key competencies needed for promoting sustainable development.”

      Jhangiani, Rajiv. "Open Educational Practices in Services of the Sustainable Development Goals." Open Con, United Nations Headquarters, New York, 2018. Recording and transcript; Permalink.

    1. grades (whether or not accompanied by comments) promote a fear of failure even in high-achieving students (Pulfrey et al., 2011)

      And add to this the cumulative effect of stressors of all kinds on learning; that the measure of that learning is a stressor in itself is inexcusable.

    1. Learning and Teaching Letter Grades are the Enemy of Authentic & Humane Learning: Bernard Bull discusses how grades work against authentic and self-determined learning. Although they are ingrained in education, he recommends considering the aspects of life free from grades and having these conversations with others. What is interesting is this is only one post being shared at the moment. Bill Ferriter shared his concerns about the association between standard grades and fixed mindset, while Will Richardson argues that grades only matter because we choose to let them matter.This continues some of the points discussed in Clive Rose’s book The End of Average and Jesse Stommell’s presentation on grades and the LMS. It is also something that Templestowe College has touched in the development of alternative pathways to higher education.

      Thanks for aggregating a variety of sources here!

      I'd recently come across Robert Talbert's post <cite>Traditional Grading: The Great Demotivator</cite> which likely fits into this same sub-topic.

    1. In other words, the human mind neither learns nor acts by large leaps, but by steps organized or structured so that each one depends upon previous steps.

      Learning theory.

    1. when critics come to particulars,

      Lad Tobin, in Writing Relationships (it's a composition pedagogy book), talks about how making an increasingly complex rubric of evaluation of a paper leads to increasing scrutiny, but that doesn't produce better writing, just more disagreement between teacher and student.

      That may only be tangentially related, but this essay seems like it might be a fun one to read in light of composition and how we teach it.

  9. Jan 2019
    1. A study by Nyhan and Reifler showed that having test subjects engage in a self-affirmation exercise significantly reduced their level of defensive processing when faced with counter-attitudinal information on policy issues.

      Relation to stereotype threat?

    1. Active-learning techniques — like sharing the responsibility for leading discussions or framing classroom expectations with our students — show them they indeed belong in this "scholarly space" and give them the confidence to engage with the course and one another.

      The ProfHacker article by Maha Bali and Steve Greenlaw explores this more concretely. Active learning for inclusion needs to be scaffolded in such a way that it does not reinforce the privilege of dominant cultures and personalities.

    2. More specifically

      Inclusive pedagogy as an element of things faculty are probably already doing.

    3. Am I having my students read a bunch of monographs, all authored by white males, for example?

      We need better ways to incentivize the finding and sharing of these more diverse arrays of knowledge forms and knowledge producers, particularly I think at introductory levels. When faculty balk at the labor of finding appropriate and diverse readings, we need resources to show that some of the work has already been done.

    1. Or you can ask them to take 1-5 minutes in class before you start discussion.

      We can also think of this pre-writing or even free writing as a mindfulness exercise which helps students reflect and potentially manage stress (beyond the stress of having to speak in public).

    2. It is important for the instructor to determine what the problem is for each particular class.

      This feels like one of the big issues in "inclusive pedagogy" - the desire for one-size-fits-all solutions necessarily opposes the goal of treating each person as an equal individual. (That said, "one size fits most" solutions are important steps forward.)

  10. Dec 2018
    1. If you think mathematics is difficult, tough, or you're scared of it, this article will indicate why and potentially show you a way forward for yourself and your children.

    2. The low achievers did not know less, they just did not use numbers flexibly—probably because they had been set on the wrong pathway, from an early age, of trying to memorize methods and number facts instead of interacting with numbers flexibly.4
    1. inclusive pedagogy is inherently open, and open pedagogies are indeed inclusive.

      I might propose inclusive pedagogy is a subset of open pedagogy. Inclusive pedagogy does not necessarily mean open. IP does not entail OP. Courses may be inclusive without components of Open (e.g. using openly-licensed materials; curating, creating and sharing content with the wider public; student-driven learning experiences).

  11. Nov 2018
    1. At its core, open pedagogy is teaching practices that facilitate the collaborative and transparent construction of knowledge made openly available through online communities.

      This might be one of the most succinct definitions of open pedagogy I have seen.

    1. a decline in public sentiment for the sage on the stage figure,

      Do active learning pedagogical approaches contribute to this decline in interest/legitimacy?

    1. Technological Pedagogical ContentKnowledge: A Framework for TeacherKnowledge

      The authors discuss the fact that traditional learning has been an intersection of content knowledge and pedagogical knowledge, but with today's learning environment, it must also intersect with technological knowledge which requires further professional growth and development. The authors further discuss the challenges keeping up with the rate of change of technology and suggest that this is just a foundation for the ongoing research in educational technology.

      RATING: 7/10

    1. This article stuck me immediately as a former K-12 teacher who now works in higher education. Andragogy and Pedagogy are both extremely similar and unalike in many ways. It is important to understand technological styles in pedagogy, as this article demonstrates, in order to effectively apply similar principles in the higher education setting.

      Rating: 8/10

  12. Oct 2018
    1. For those of us on the frontline of K-12 teaching, “education as the practice of freedom” requires forthright discussion and action regarding subjects that are messy (at least in terms of their challenge to the agreed narrative and the cultural status quo) and this messiness can potentially make people uncomfortable, confused, upset, angry, and even potentially confrontational or worse, violent. Administrators and teachers and colleagues generally do not want to embrace the concept of education as the practice of freedom if it means rocking the boat too much.
    2. Dissimilarly, in Teaching to Transgress, bell hooks urges teachers to contemplate “Education as the practice of freedom” as their point of departure for praxis. A phrase originating from the work of Paulo Freire, hooks writes that “education as the practice of freedom” will come easiest “to those of us…who believe that our work is not merely to share information, but to share in the intellectual and spiritual growth of our students. To teach in a manner that respects and cares for the souls of our students is essential if we are to provide the necessary conditions where learning can most deeply and intimately begin.” Transgressive education and disruptive thinking therefore begin with the soul, and not the prospective career opportunities, of students.
  13. Sep 2018
    1. Third, the post-LMS world should protect the pedagogical prerogatives and intellectual property rights of faculty members at all levels of employment. This means, for example, that contingent faculty should be free to take the online courses they develop wherever they happen to be teaching. Similarly, professors who choose to tape their own lectures should retain exclusive rights to those tapes. After all, it’s not as if you have to turn over your lecture notes to your old university whenever you change jobs.

      Own your pedagogy. Send just like anything else out there...

    1. Within the context of this study, OER refer to free, open textbooks, which replaced previously adopted expensive, traditional, commercial textb

      suggests that OERs replace traditional textbooks or purchased resources, thus is there any relationship to any pedagogical change related to the use of OERs?

    1. The basic assumption that underlies typical reading instruction in many schools is that learning to read is a natural process, much like learning to talk. But decades of scientific research has revealed that reading doesn't come naturally. The human brain isn't wired to read. Kids must be explicitly taught how to connect sounds with letters — phonics.

      . . .

      But this research hasn't made its way into many elementary school classrooms. The prevailing approaches to reading instruction in American schools are inconsistent with basic things scientists have discovered about how children learn to read. Many educators don't know the science, and in some cases actively resist it.

      https://www.apmreports.org/story/2018/09/10/further-reading-hard-words

  14. Aug 2018
    1. The "inclusive" aspect of the model means that every student has the same materials on the first day of class, with the charge included as part of their tuition.

      It almost sounds to me like they know they're not getting a cut of the money from poorer students who are finding the material for free online anyway, so they're trying to up the stakes of the piece of pie that they're getting from a different angle.

      This other model of subscription at the level of the college or university is also one that they're well aware of based on involvement with subscription fees for journal access.

    1. What David told me was his energy, enthusiasm in the class was at a much higher level with the OER approach. Sure we choose the polished “professional” textbook because of its assumed high standards, quality etc, but then its a more passive relationship a teacher has with it. I make the comparison to growing and/or making your own food versus having it prepared or taking it out of a package. Having produced our own food means we know everything about it from top to bottom, and the pride in doing that has to make the whole experience much more energized.

      As I read both this post and this comment from Alan, I can't help but think again about scholars in the 14th century who taught students. It was more typical of the time that students were "forced" to chose their own textbooks--typically there were fewer, and at the advent of the printing press they were significantly higher in price. As a result students had to spend more time and attention, as Robin indicates here, to come up with useful things.

      Even in this period students often annotated their books, which often got passed on to other students and even professors which helped future generations. So really, we're not reinventing the wheel here, we're just doing it anew with new technology that makes doing it all the easier.

      As a reference, I'll suggest folks interested in this area read Owen Gingerich's The Book Nobody Read.

    2. working in public, and asking students to work in public, is fraught with dangers and challenges.
    1. They are allowed to operate independently and explore with personal freedom.

      There is still typically a "thing(s)" they need to learn, a goal they need to reach, or standards that are typically set, so the freedom only goes so far.

    1. Because students know their work will be used both by their peers and potentially by future generations of students, they invest in this work at a different level.

      I'm wondering if Greg McVerry stated something along these lines at the beginning of EDU522? I suspected he's planning something along these lines, but I'm unsure if it was stated specifically. Students should also know about creative commons and be actively opting in to creating this content as open while they're doing it. They also shouldn't be forced into opening it up, or if they do, not necessarily taking credit for it if they choose not to.

    2. Free to accessFree to reuseFree to reviseFree to remixFree to redistributeThe question becomes, then, what is the relationship between these additional capabilities and what we know about effective teaching and learning? How can we extend, revise, and remix our pedagogy based on these additional capabilities?

      I look at this and think immediatly about the Git model of allowing people to not only fork and reuse/redistribute pieces, but what about the ability to do pull requests to take improvements and push them back up the the source so that everyone potentially benefits?

    1. And to Vivian Rolfe’s point made at OpenEd 16, are we are paying enough attention to voices of the past?

      And of course, there's the flip side of thinking about the voices of the future as well. Looking at the past is a nice exercise, but consider what those in the past would have potentially done differently if they could have seen the future? We should spend a moment or two of reflection on what the future potentially holds with the prior of where we are right now.

    2. open pedagogy is currently a sort of proxy for the use and creation of open educational resources as opposed to being tied to a broader pedagogical objective.
    3. us ed tech folks will recognize some of the themes – individualized learning, learner choice, self-direction, – to name a few.

      Aren't these all just Montessori principles under a different name?

    4. Paquette outlines 3 sets of foundational values of open pedagogy, namely:  autonomy and interdependence; freedom and responsibility; democracy and participation.
    1. The current buzz about open pedagogy got kick-started in David Wiley’s 2013 blog post. Wiley defined open pedagogy as any approach or technique that would not be possible without the “5Rs” (at the time listed as the “4Rs plus free to access”: free to access, free to reuse, free to revise, free to remix, free to redistribute – the right to retain came later…) of OER.
    1. cyberinfrastructure is something more specific thanthe network itself, but it is something more general than a tool or a resource developed for a particular proj-ect, a range of projects, or, even more broadly, for a particular discipline.

      Mentioned in the video https://youtu.be/lelmXaSibrc?t=17m35s

  15. Jul 2018
  16. Jun 2018
    1. could both study and create “non-print,” “electronic,” and “visual” texts

      Perhaps because I studied Calkins and Atwell, with an emphasis in the work of James Moffett, a transition through workshop to applying technology was easier than for those who had not, and still have not, experienced the personal and individual nature of a writer. The emphasis is on the writer as a writer.

  17. May 2018
    1. Fostering an accountable, inclusive and stimulating environment requires an instructor to be acutely sensitive to individual differences between learners and the emotional dimensions of learning. In an online environment, in the majority of cases, the instructors cannot see the students’ facial expressions, they cannot hear the tone of their voices or capture any unwritten reactions, thoughts or feelings; therefore, we should choose our words carefully, and be aware of how the message may be miscommunicated and misunderstood.

      So much of this depends on course design and faculty presence. Makes all the difference in the world. Frankly, I've been in face-to-face courses that felt far less inclusive than well-designed and facilitated online courses.

  18. Apr 2018
    1. Our pedagogical values necessitated arguments for small class sizes and studio-type teaching environments. We repeatedly returned to these pedagogical arguments, in reports, in meetings, in conversations, in emails—anytime we needed to advocate for resources that would help us to best teach communication studies in theory and practice. These repeated ideas and approaches became the basis for what we call our design philosophy—our particular ideas about the purpose of built environments and what they should accomplish. Written in plain English with minimal jargon, the statement reflects our shared beliefs and specific objectives regarding teaching spaces. Our design philosophy became a tool to effectively interface with a variety of stakeholders, from administration to facilities to IT. It became a tool to guide our process of production; at times, it served as our creed, or manifesto.

      Pedagogy points of emphasis

    1. The eight distinct sub-topics within open education over the past four decades were identified as open access, OER, MOOCs, open educational practice, social media, e-learning, open education in schools and distance learning.

      What I notice is missing from here is open pedagogy which, as Tannis Morgan noted, has historical roots in the late 70's in Quebec. However, it may be that because this is a historical look at open education, and open pedagogy is a relatively recent (despite the work Tannis has discovered) area of interest for open educators, there may just be a lack of formalized research supporting the idea of open pedagogy.

  19. Mar 2018
    1. Try, explore, fail, share, revise.

      Yes. Time to get past the fear of all of these things, especially the trying, failing and revising. And the exploring...yes, all of them!

    2. Let students curate course content.

      Absolutely. The course should be something we make together rather than something students "take" and faculty "deliver."

    3. Build course policies, outcomes, assignments, rubrics, and schedules of work collaboratively with students. Once we involve students in creating or revising OERs or in shaping learning architectures, we can begin to see the syllabus as more of a collaborative document, co-generated at least in part with our students.

      Would love to see more institutional support and encouragement for doing this.

    4. Students can choose to openly license the work that they post on these sites, thereby contributing OERs to the commons; they can also choose not to openly license their work, which is an exercising of their rights and perfectly in keeping with the ethos of Open Pedagogy. If students create their own learning architectures, they can (and should) control how public or private they wish to be, how and when to share or license their work, and what kinds of design, tools, and plug-ins will enhance their learning. It is important to point out here that open is not the opposite of private.

      Yes. Shades of open. Informed agency.

    5. So one key component of Open Pedagogy might be that it sees access, broadly writ, as fundamental to learning and to teaching, and agency as an important way of broadening that access.

      Access + agency = Open Pedagogy

    6. Will they be able to read their Chemistry textbook given their vision impairment? Will their LMS site list them by their birth name rather than their chosen name, and thereby misgender them? Will they have access to the knowledge they need for research if their college restricts their search access or if they don’t have Wi-Fi or a computer at home? Are they safe to participate in online, public collaborations if they are undocumented? Is their college or the required adaptive learning platform collecting data on them, and if so, could those data be used in ways that could put them at risk?

      Crucial questions here. It's challenging for faculty to ask and answer all of them at the same time. But we simply must.

    7. Open Pedagogy” as a named approach to teaching is nothing new. Scholars such as Catherine Cronin,[1] Katy Jordan,[2] Vivien Rolfe,[3] and Tannis Morgan have traced the term back to early etymologies. Morgan cites a 1979 article[4] by the Canadian Claude Paquette: “Paquette outlines three sets of foundational values of Open Pedagogy, namely: autonomy and interdependence; freedom and responsibility; democracy and participation.”

      This historical framing is important - a wonderful reminder of previous democratizing and empowering currents in education.

    8. We hope that this chapter will inspire those of us in education to focus our critical and aspirational lenses on larger questions about the ideology embedded within our educational systems and the ways in which pedagogy impacts these systems. At the same time we hope to provide some tools and techniques to those who want to build a more empowering, collaborative, and just architecture for learning.

      For me this is an essential summons -- the pedagogies we cultivate and perpetuate are not ideologically neutral. Open Ed, OEP and Open Ped have the potential to challenge the neoliberal currents many of us find so antithetical to our calling and commitment as educators. Keeping the focus on the nexus of theory and practice is critical.

    9. avoid digital redlining,[26] creating inequities (however unintentionally) through the use of technology.

      So many challenges here, and we really must address all of them. I'm also interested in learning how to make sure my websites and other affordances I use are accessible to people with disabilities.

    1. “Open Pedagogy and a Very Brief History of the Concept.” Explorations in the Ed Tech World, 21 Dec. 2016, https://homonym.ca/uncategorized/open-pedagogy-and-a-very-brief-history-of-the-concept/.

    2. For Paquette, open is very much about learner choice, (albeit for him this is really about creating a classroom environment where this can be optimized).  Good stuff right? Of course, this becomes much more fascinating if you consider the sociopolitical context in which these ideas were playing out.

      I so appreciate this framing - context is essential (and always sociopolitical). Thank you!

    1. Este libro fue creado íntegramente por estudiantes en la sección de otoño de 2016 del Seminario de primer año en la Universidad Estatal de Plymouth. Llamamos al curso "OpenSem" porque se organizó en torno a un conjunto básico de prácticas pedagógicas abiertas. El tema del curso fue "¿De quién es este curso, de todos modos?" Los estudiantes crearon todos los resultados de aprendizaje, tareas, políticas de curso y procesos de calificación. Los estudiantes seleccionaron el contenido y crearon el plan de estudios a medida que se desarrollaba el curso. Los estudiantes publicaron todo el trabajo en sus propios ePorts públicos, obtuvieron una licencia que funciona abiertamente, y luego cedieron una muestra de ese trabajo a esta colección para compartirla fácilmente. Puede ver nuestro hashtag en Twitter en #opensem y ver el programa en 

      This part I identify with "Learner Generate"

    1. Aunque el maestro dicte lo que se aprende, los estudiantes deciden qué parte de esa información recogen. Nadie ayudará a un alumno si no comienza a ayudarse a sí mismo. En conclusión, esta es la razón por la que la

      I think that this part it could be " reflexive practice"

  20. Feb 2018
    1. Some benefits of inclusive teaching are:You can connect with and engage with a variety of students.You are prepared for “spark moments” or issues that arise when controversial material is discussed.Students connect with course materials that are relevant to them. Students feel comfortable in the classroom environment to voice their ideas/thoughts/questions. Students are more likely to experience success in your course through activities that support their learning styles, abilities, and backgrounds.How can you teach inclusively?Be reflective by asking yourself the following:How might your own cultural-bound assumptions influence your interactions with students? How might the backgrounds and experiences of your students influence their motivation, engagement, and learning in your classroom?How can you modify course materials, activities, assignments, and/or exams to be more accessible to all students in your class?
    1. The purpose of these four summits is to create a community of practice focused on developing a culture of shared norms and values that establish an inclusive learning environment, one that prohibits anyone from being disadvantaged or unjustly treated because of social identity or status. The Student Success Summits will offer information, strategies, and guidance to support the identification, integration and implementation of inclusive pedagogical methods that promote discipline-specific learning objectives.
  21. Jan 2018
    1. With a partner, the students will try to play the first two rounds of the game. Based on the strategies they examined and how their partner performed the game actions, students will try to guess which cards their partner has. Students can do this activity several times before playing a real game with four players.

      Another great step -- play a character but be observed by another player in order to get feedback on how you played, or on what language issues you had. This offloads a lot of the cognitive demands of the game perhaps? Or at least gives the "player" the opportunity to get appropriate feedback!

  22. Dec 2017
    1. a pedagogy of small

      I love this phrase. I am reminded of Robert Twigger's splendid book Micromastery. The subtitle to his book is "learn small, learn fast", i.e. pedagogies of small.

      That takes me in a natural way to Buckminster Fullers metaphor of the "trim tab". Ho loved that idea so much, he put it on his grave stone.

      Let's find the trim tabs, the micromasteries, the small pedagogies that might work as we learn together. That is the kind of we-search I can support. Wholly.

  23. Nov 2017
    1. new methodologies

      Are they really new? Or is it figuring out how to utilize tech to support interactivity, engagement, community etc. but in an asynchronous community when time and space CANNOT be leveraged.

    1. This is certainly how the debate about licensing has played out.

      In fact, Rory McGreal adamantly argues that CC-BY-NC material is too restrictive to be called “OER”. We had a short exchange about this. In Quebec’s Cégep system, NC was the rule for reasons which are probably easy to understand. So the focus is on licenses, in this scene, not on practices. Hence the whole thing about Open Textbooks. Often made me wonder if any of these people had compared textbook-based teaching to any of the other modalities. In my teaching, textbooks are a problem, even when they’re open. Sure, some of those problems can be solved when you have access to the code and can produce your own textbook from that. That’s the typical solution offered in the GitHub sphere:

      Just Fork It!

      But the core problem remains: if you’re teaching with a textbook, you may not really be building knowledge with learners.

      (Should probably move this here.)

  24. Oct 2017
    1. While I've experimented with many alternatives to traditional assessment, I have primarily relied on self-assessment. I turn in final grades at the end of the term, but those grades usually match the grades students have given themselves. (I do tell students 'I reserve the right to change grades,' but this is rare and I mostly have to raise them, because students are often their own harshest critics.)

      Jesse Stommel

    1. And they invite faculty to ask questions about how we can impact access in ways that go beyond textbook costs

      Interesting point. Once we start talking about access through textbook costs, we open the door to faculty thinking about access in the other ways listed above too.

    1. In this FLT article, I am introducing a new pedagogy I call the Pedagogy of Retrieval. This is the pedagogy I use to try to interrupt the automatic use of lower potential learning strategies in my flipped classrooms at The University of Texas at Austin, and it is built on the collective body of research and efforts of my colleagues mentioned above.
  25. Sep 2017
    1. Geisler (1994) and Russell and Yañez (2002) discuss a comparable situation in theUSA, where to fulfil general education requirements, undergraduates take a numberof disciplinary courses in fields which are not their major. They note the contradic-tions involved in conflating the aims of general education and disciplinary encultura-tion, with lecturers using a disciplinary discourse that is not only unfamiliar tostudents, but also seen as irrelevant to their individual aims and aspirations. Similarly,Moore (2000) discusses the tension between integration and disciplinarity in an inter-disciplinary foundation course in South Africa, voicing concerns that the attempt topromote generic competences risks undermining the disciplinary basis of academicperformance (p. 192).

      research and bibliography on the mismatch between gen ed or breadth students and the rhetoric of instructors who are intending to socialise people in their field.

    1. Thus, the integration of multiple modalities can be beneficial for learning and this practice is conflated with the learning styles neuromyth. In other words, this particular neuromyth presents a challenge to the education field because it seems to be supporting effective instructional practice, but for the wrong reasons. To dispel this particular myth might inadvertently discourage diversity in instructional approaches if it is not paired with explicit discussion of the distinctions between learning styles theory and multimodal instruction.
  26. Aug 2017
    1. Perhaps we should only use open as a modifier for other pedagogies,

      I feel like this is where consensus between the parties divided above might come in. I don't know the right -ism, but aren't there many fundamental and shared pedagogical principles between open web and open resource advocates when it comes to how these things effect teaching and learning?

    1. This edited book represents a sliver, albeit a substantial one, of the scholarship on the science of learning and its application in educational settings. Most of the work described in this book is based on theory and research in cognitive psychology. Although much, but not all, of what is presented is focused on learning in college and university settings, teachers of all academic levels may find the recommendations made by chapter authors of service.
  27. Jul 2017
    1. The focus is not so much on what we are learning but on how we are learning.5

      People need the ability to understand how to learn, NOT the just the ability to learn stuff.

  28. May 2017
    1. ne critical element in the effectiveness of these networks is “working in the open.” This includes a number of simple practices commonly associated with open source software: making curriculum and tools easy for others to discover; publishing using an editable format that allows others to freely use and adapt them; using an open license like Creative Commons. It also includes a set of work practices that make it easy for people to collaborate across organizations and locations: collaborative writing in shared online documents; shared public plans on wiki or other editable documents; progress reports and insights shared in real time and posted on blogs. These simple practices are the grease that lubricates the network, allowing ideas to flow and innovations to spread. More importantly, they make it possible for people to genuinely build things together—and learn along the way. This point cannot be emphasized strongly enough: when people build things together they tend to own them emotionally and want to roll them out after they are created. If the people building together are from different institutions, then the innovations spread more quickly to more institutions.

      These are all important aspects of open pedagogy, imo. Transparent, network practices that connect, but also create space and opportunities for particiaption by those on the edges. Working in the open is an invitation to particiaption to others.

  29. Apr 2017
    1. I think the locking down of open is dangerous. I think it draws lines where they need not be, and it reconsolidates power for those who define it. More than that, the power around open has been pretty focused on a few people for too long, and I count myself amongst them.

      amen.

  30. paulesau.com