10 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. Student evaluations of teachers are notoriously biased against women, with women routinely receiving lower scores than their male counterparts.

      I recall some work on this sort of gender bias in job recommendations as well. Remember to dig it up for reference as well.

  2. Sep 2019
    1. Short-term (i.e., “This year, I will see...”) and long-term (i.e., “In 10 years, I will see...) indicators are needed.

      Metrics must represent short and long-term view to capture impact over time.

    2. These guidelines offer a lens that is distinct to our field and represent emergent directions in our work that are important to capture, particularly larger-scale change initiatives in alignment with college and university priorities.

      CTLs need guidelines for evaluation of their work. In the last two years, more research is beginning to emerge on how to analyze the unique impacts of CTLs.

    3. These guidelines define evaluation as information used for local decision making, which can also make a CTL’s work visible on campus.

      Evaluation to raise visibility of CTLs on campus.

  3. Jan 2019
  4. May 2018
  5. May 2017
  6. Jan 2017
  7. Jun 2016
    1. I often use a supplemental evaluation form at the end of the term. There are two competing functions of the evaluation. The first is to give you feedback for course improvement, and the second is to assess performance. What the students might think is constructive feedback might be seen as a negative critique by those not in the classroom. It’s in our interest to separate those two functions onto separate pieces of paper. Before we went digital, I used to hold up the university form and say: “This form [holding up the scantron] is being used by the school as a referendum on my continued employment. I won’t be able to access these forms until after the next semester already starts, so they won’t help me out that much.” Then I held up another piece of paper [an evaluation I wrote with specific questions about the course] and said, “This one is constructive feedback about what you liked and didn’t like about the course. If you have criticisms of the course that you want me to see, but don’t think that my bosses need to see them, then this is the place to do it. Note that this form has specific questions about our readings, homework, tests and lessons. I’m just collecting these for myself, and I’d prefer if you don’t put your names on them.” I find that students are far more likely to evaluate my teaching in broad strokes in the university form when I use this approach, and there are fewer little nitpicky negative comments.

      A version of the famous advice to let students evaluate you twice: once privately and once formally