240 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice was one example, with Pratchett pointing out the help provided by the Wellcome Trust’s Public Engagement Fund. The trust is a foundation in England that gives grants to projects in film, TV and video games that have a biological or neurological component. Part of the grant process also comes with support from consultants, who work with recipients. For Hellblade, that meant replicating Senua’s psychosis in a convincing and sensitive way, and so University of Cambridge’s Professor Paul Fletcher became integral to the game’s development.

      I didn't play Senua's Sacrifice personally, I saw a let's play of it on YouTube. And it was amazing. It makes so much sense now that there was such a great collaboration between the company, Trust fund, Uni and writer(s) - because the psychosis reflected in the game that you experience through Senua's perspective WAS really well done, and done with care/sensitivity. It also is the way mental illnesses should be done in games from now on.

    1. “To write a great book, you must first become the book.”  - Atomic Habits
    2. I could and probably will write an entire article (or 10) on how I approach SEO research, but for the purpose of this article, I’ll just share that I use these tools: Ahrefs, Keyword Planner, and Keywords Everywhere.

      SEO tools to consider while writing a blog post:

    3. Conversations, books and articles, personal experiences, and random Google searches

      Sources of ideas

    4. What is something that I can uniquely contribute?

      Good question to ask while searching for idea to write about

    5. I set an open invitation to my brain to take note of anything interesting. More specifically, I look for anything within the intersection of: (1) interesting, (2) doesn’t exist online in that exact form, and (3) something I can contribute uniquely to

      Ideation - look for topics to write about: Idea Ikigai

    6. In my opinion, writing should never be something that you do just to check off of your to-do list. At its core, writing is a mechanism to try to deliver value to others. And over time, I’ve defined that as my core goal.

      Indeed, writing for others is a great devotion

    7. There’s a great tool called Draftback, which essentially lets you “go back in time to look over your own shoulder as you write”

      Draftback Chrome Extension allows to "rewatch" your writing process

    8. Writing Process Steps:Ideation: PassiveTracking: ActiveOutline - ActiveIdea Arbitrage - PassiveResearch - ActiveWriting - Active

      Proposition of steps to follow while writing. Active state requires a "hard-core execute mode".

      1. Ideation (passive)
      2. Tracking (active)
      3. Outline (active)
      4. Idea Arbitrage (passive)
      5. Research (active)
      6. Writing (active)
  2. Oct 2019
    1. How to Be a Better Person

      Many philosophers throughout the centuries have preached the same thing that life is a journey and becoming better every day is a goal. As a general rule of thumb, most of us wish to become a better person. Unfortunately, many people become stuck and fixate on the mistakes they’ve made in life, preventing them from becoming a better version of themselves. Meanwhile, many others aren’t aware of how to go about bringing self-improvement. The good news is that it is possible for every human being on the planet to become a better person. Learning to love oneself is a skill, and much like any other skill, it can be learned. Take the example of an online essay writing service. No service becomes the best essay writing service without dedication and consistent practice. In a similar vein, no person can learn to be a better person without consistent and conscious efforts. Thankfully, thanks to thousands of years of human existence, we have other people’s experience to guide us towards the path to being a better person. Here are some tips that can help anyone become better versions of themselves. Compliment Yourself In our world full of comparisons and competition, it can be very easy to drown with self-pity and lack of self-esteem. This is further bolstered by the presence of social media in today’s society, where it seems like everyone is achieving success and living the best life. This is why it’s so important to be aware of one’s own good quality. Finding out the positives in yourself and complimenting yourself for it will allow you to break free from the mental shackles and adopt more positive habits. It also makes one happy and happiness, as we all know, is contagious. Don’t Make Excuses Making excuses or blaming someone else for mishaps or shortcomings is very easy. However, this leads nowhere. By accepting responsibility, owning mistakes and learning from them, one can grow in both personal and professional life. It breeds a sense of control over life, and ultimately makes one happier, which in turn makes one a better person. Let Go of Anger All of us go through different experiences in life. No one’s life is perfect, and there are bound to be negative experiences in everyone’s life. Human beings aren’t perfect; hence they tend to hurt others intentionally or intentionally. However, being angry at someone and not letting go of it only affects you. It casts a cloud over one’s judgement and decision-making ability. That is why it’s so important to let go of anger. Understanding that everything happens for a reason allows one to be content and focus efforts on other more important things. Practice Forgiveness This tip goes along with the last point. Forgiving others, as well as the self, is an incredibly elating experience. Forgiveness is one of the greatest forms of sacrifice. It requires sacrificing one’s ego, the greatest enemy to personal betterment and growth. Things like meditation and self-reflection can help a lot in this department.

  3. Sep 2019
    1. “students will write differently, you know, if they know it’s not just going to their professor.

      Changes the audience and gets students to think about writing for a larger, perhaps more general audience. This is an important aspect if we want to have, say, highly technical disciplines, like sciences, learning to engage more broadly with the public. Having learners understand the importance of writing for an audience that is more general could become an important open pedagogy principle for disciplines that want to have their work have a broader impact with the general public.

    1. disk Use disk only in the context of Azure cloud storage and virtual machines.Use hard drive, not disk, fixed disk, hard disk, or disk drive to refer to the drive on a PC where programs are typically stored.
    1. so byinsisting that the poetic impulse could not be fulfilled unless the sexualimpulse was repressed, Milton was in effect creating an equivalence betweenthem.

      This sounds very similar to how many some people today believe that as both are an act of creation, there are some similarities between writing and reproduction from a certain philosophical point of view.

  4. Aug 2019
    1. Moreover, annotation is the agreed upon means of starting and sustaining that conversation.

      With this text appearing on bookbook.pubpub.org being an excellent example of just this. #meta

      I'm sort of hoping for some discussion of Kathleen Fitzpatrick's process behind her book Planned Obsolescence which was released in draft form for open peer review in fall 2009, much like Annotations. It's the first example I can think of a scholar doing something like this digitally in public, though there may have been other earlier examples.

  5. Jul 2019
    1. See also the author's own take.

      If the Modernists loved revision so much that they kept at it throughout the literary process, including when their work was in proofs — and one of Sullivan’s key points is that these discrete stages actually encouraged revision — then why didn’t their printers and publishers complain? ... changing work in proofs is expensive.

      That's because Modernists had the support money to revise and to experiment with the rules of revision.

      In her memoir Shakespeare & Company, Sylvia Beach recalls Joyce’s publisher warning about “a lot of extra expenses with these proofs. . . . He suggested that I call Joyce’s attention to the danger of going beyond my depth; perhaps his appetite for proofs might be curbed.”

      But Beach explains that, for her, the most important thing was that Joyce could work as diligently and obsessively as he wanted to:

      I wouldn’t hear of such a thing. Ulysses was to be as Joyce wished, in every respect. I wouldn’t advise ‘real’ publishers to follow my example, nor authors to follow Joyce’s. It would be the death of publishing. My case was different. It seemd natural to me that the efforts and sacrifices on my part should be proportionate to the greatnes of the work I was publishing.

    1. Damn right I just drew fire breathing sharks.

      very good example of post with engaging style

  6. May 2019
    1. About this time I met with an odd volume of the Spectator.[18] It was the third. I had never before seen any of them. I bought it, read it over and over, and was much delighted with it. I thought the writing excellent, and wished, if possible, to imitate it. With this view I took some of the papers, and, making short hints of the sentiment in each sentence, laid them by a few days, and then, without looking at the book, try'd to compleat the papers again, by expressing each hinted sentiment at length, and as fully as it had been expressed before, in any suitable words that should come to hand. Then I compared my Spectator with the original, discovered some of my faults, and corrected them. But I found I wanted a stock of words, or a readiness in recollecting and using them, which I thought I should have acquired before that time if I had gone on making verses; since the continual occasion for words of the same import, but of different length, to suit the measure, or of different sound for the rhyme, would have laid me under a constant necessity of searching for variety, and also have tended to fix that variety in my mind, and make me master of it. Therefore I took some of the tales and turned them into verse; and, after a time, when I had pretty well forgotten the prose, turned them back again. I also sometimes jumbled my collections of hints into confusion, and after some weeks endeavored to reduce them into the best order, before I began to form the full sentences and compleat the paper. This was to teach me method in the arrangement of thoughts. By comparing my work afterwards with the original, I discovered many faults and amended them; but I sometimes had the pleasure of fancying that, in certain particulars of small import, I had been lucky enough to improve the method of the language, and this encouraged me to think I might possibly in time come to be a tolerable English writer, of which I was extremely ambitious. My time for these exercises and for reading was at night, after work or before it began in the morning, or on Sundays, when I contrived to be in the printing-house alone, evading as much as I could the common attendance on public worship which my father used to exact of me when I was under his care, and which indeed I still thought a duty, thought I could not, as it seemed to me, afford time to practise it.

      Even the greats copied or loosely plagiarized the "masters" to learn how to write.The key is to continually work at it until you get to the point where it's yours and it is no longer plagiarism.

      This was also the general premise behind the plotline of the movie Finding Forrester.

    1. phonetic signs, introduced to transcribe the name of individuals, marked the turning point when writing started emulating spoken language

      Interesting connection to identity and self-representation there.

    2. Writing was used exclusively for accounting until the third millennium BC, when the Sumerian concern for the afterlife paved the way to literature by using writing for funerary inscriptions

      I'm interested in this apparent instrumental - abstracted - literary/metaphysical progression. It seems to be recapitulated with great frequency (and not a one-way progression.)

  7. Apr 2019
    1. We expect authentic writing from our students, yet we do not write authentic assignments for them.

      I'd like to understand this better. How much choice is required for an assignment to be "meaningful" or "authentic". I can't recall a single writing assignment when I didn't have some freedom to choose a topic (within the bounds of the class) - though there were certainly lots of formal constraints in the way I wrote.

    2. Actually, a whole gotcha industry has sprung up.

      The "gotcha" industry has this whole Inspector Javert aspect to it - plagiarism is a thing that students do intentionally to hurt teachers (not something which might come out of ignorance or have motivations completely unrelated to the teacher) and teachers become the agents of a justice system mostly interested in rooting out offenders.

    1. Interesting how the events of the time shaped the story of 1984 (e.g. rationing in food and fuel). Also a potent image of Orwell writing while he was so sick. His journal entries suggest the inspiration for and the act of writing never stop.

  8. Mar 2019
    1. But it’s far more that just a cultural signpost. The reason Coney Island of the Mind has held up so well is that it also marks the first full flowering of Ferlinghetti’s considerable poetic gifts. Employing open elastic lines that often seesaw across the page, Ferlinghetti’s verse is a unique combination of Whitmanesque proclamation and Dionysian celebration, where a deep love for life and art is interlaced with call for the human race to finally begin living up to its potential. … Fifty years on, Coney Island of the Mind, Ferlinghetti’s artistic and commercial breakthrough, still stands as an excellent example of both his social and poetic contributions, and is not only a worthy but probably a necessary volume for the library of anyone truly serious about understanding where English-language poetry has been and where it is going.

      Go, Ferlinghetti, for at least another 100 years.

    1. This is Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive objectives. I selected this page because it explains both the old and new versions of the taxonomy. When writing instructional objectives for adult learning and training, one should identify the level of learning in Blooms that is needed. This is not the most attractive presentation but it is one of the more thorough ones. rating 4/5

    1. what is plain language This government site describes the rationale for plain language and more importantly provides some tools for using it. Plain language can be useful when writing text for e-learning products, among other things; this is a useful site to review. There is a list of resources as well. rating 4/5

    1. This 69 page PDF offers good advice on writing a variety of types of test questions. It is called "Is this a trick question?" Despite the length of the PDF, it is easy to browse if you are interested in writing a specific type of question. As may be suggested by the length, this resource is more comprehensive than others. Rating 5/5

  9. Feb 2019
    1. first draft could represent a free outpouring of thoughts

      This paragraph outlines a truly augmented way of writing that cannot happen using paper. To me noting on paper has changed purpose. Sometimes it is an echo noting of a quote, a key word, a diagram. It is closer to drawing. But writing as thinking out loud, writing as trying to make sense...that is tech aided. I am sure my mind changes its processimg focus depending on whether I face a screen or a copybook. Just as you shift perspective when you watch through a camera lens to take a good pic...you see more.

    1. one needs little stylistic ornament because people arc naturally attracted lo truth if they can sec it clearly.

      In other words, don't write like an academic--or a lawyer.

    2. I have made no distinction in what has been said between Speaking and Writing, because tho they are talenL'i which do not always meet, yet >"'1•""�� there is no material difference between 'cm.

      I think Ong would take issue with the notion that there is no "material difference" between speaking and writing. Writing is a "technology" so to speak, and thus presents itself differently than mere thought through speaking. One can go back and edit writing, whereas orality is not so easily done.

    1. am aware it will be said, that written language is only a copy of that which is spoken

      Others have theorized that this is just not true. Yagelski sees writing and thought as running more fluidly together with experiences and "being in the world."

    1. These outcomes and estimated effect sizes bring us back to a key applied question: Which method—longhand (on paper or eWriter) or laptop—should students use to take notes? At this point, we would argue that the available evidence does not provide a definitive answer to this question.
    1. Even poets and other authors,whose compositions are chiefly calculated toplease the imagination,

      I have never viewed writing as a calculation. This is an interesting idea.

  10. Jan 2019
    1. The interplay between the present as actual and the presentas virtual spells the rhythms of subject formation.

      Following their Foucault reference, this reminds me of his "Self Writing" piece. The self is formed through the physical, material act of writing -- "the present as actual" -- and the transmission of self across space and time through the letter -- "the present as virtual". The subject, then, emerges against the interplay of the material and the virtual.

    1. Or you can ask them to take 1-5 minutes in class before you start discussion.

      We can also think of this pre-writing or even free writing as a mindfulness exercise which helps students reflect and potentially manage stress (beyond the stress of having to speak in public).

    1. It’s not a problem I can solve, but it’s a reality I can acknowledge, a paradigm through which I can understand my actions.

      writing = therapy :)

    1. Regardless of your discipline, there’s a good chance that at some point you will be responsible for teaching or grading writing in some shape or form.

      This is an important point that a lot of people in fields outside of the liberal arts don't realize. Writing happens in all disciplines.

    1. What if we rode harder onthe performative, as Barad urges, seeing it as“material enactments that contribute to, andare a part of, the phenomena we describe.”19This ontological shift asks us to situate thehuman more complexly in the material world, and seek out fresh understandings ofhow it manifests in who we are and what we do.

      This reminds me of Foucault's Self Writing.

    2. ee it instead as extended out and threadedthrough material objects and practices

      To relate this to writing, writing isn't simply a transcription tool for the brain; the process (the tools used to compose, the revisions, the space you work within -- the "material objects and practices") is itself generative of new modes of inquiry and ideas.

    3. I will complicate both narratives, showing that each depends on earlier devel-opments.

      classic scholarly move -- I'm appreciating the repeated use of the personal "I" through here. I've noticed (both here and in Paul's class) that scholars of rhetoric seem more amenable to personal insertion into academic writing.

    1. Seneca

      Cicero also identifies writing as essential in De Oratore. It crops up a few times, but one of them is in Book I, section 150 or so.

    2. CORRESPONDENCE

      Throughout this section, Foucault characterizes correspondence as a way to reveal the self: "a certain way of manifesting oneself to oneself and to others," to "show oneself," "a decipherment of the self by the self as an opening one gives the other onto oneself."

      This sort of 'opening' is to make oneself vulnerable, to be seen by others. (cf. Marback's "A Meditation on Vulnerability in Rhetoric")

      This is characteristic particularly of writing that is intended for others (correspondence), but in what ways are other forms of writing equally--if not more--revealing of the self?

      (That also makes me question whether any writing is truly for the self and not intended in some way for others. Even diaries/journals are written with the possible eventuality that someone other than the writer will read it.)

    3. The letter one sends in order to help one’s correspondent —advise him, exhort him, admonish him, console him— constitutes for the writer a kind of training: something like soldiers in peacetime practicing the manual of arms, the opinions that one gives to others in a pressing situation are a way of preparing oneself for a similar eventuality.

      With the advent of social media and digital communication letter writing has become lost. With less letter writing, do think we have lost this type of training?

    4. notebooks serving as memory aids. Their use as books of life, as guides for conduct

      Hm. So in the analogy above, does that mean "others" in a community serve as reminders of how not to live (in the case of non-ascetics) or how to live (other ascetics)?

      Plato wouldn't like that (Phaedrus, writing as destructive to memory).

    5. writing about oneself appears clearly in its relationship of complementarity with reclusion

      Ong argues that writing in general (not just self-reflective writing) is isolating. In his "Writing Is a Technology that Restructures Thought," he says, "Writing is diaeretic. It divides and distances, and it divides and distances all sorts of things in all sorts of ways," one of which is the way the writer becomes reclusive and divided from the world when caught up in the act of thinking and writing.

    1. You don't need complex sentences to express complex ideas. When specialists in some abstruse topic talk to one another about ideas in their field, they don't use sentences any more complex than they do when talking about what to have for lunch. They use different words, certainly. But even those they use no more than necessary. And in my experience, the harder the subject, the more informally experts speak. Partly, I think, because they have less to prove, and partly because the harder the ideas you're talking about, the less you can afford to let language get in the way.
    2. It seems to be hard for most people to write in spoken language. So perhaps the best solution is to write your first draft the way you usually would, then afterward look at each sentence and ask "Is this the way I'd say this if I were talking to a friend?" If it isn't, imagine what you would say, and use that instead. After a while this filter will start to operate as you write. When you write something you wouldn't say, you'll hear the clank as it hits the page.Before I publish a new essay, I read it out loud and fix everything that doesn't sound like conversation. I even fix bits that are phonetically awkward; I don't know if that's necessary, but it doesn't cost much.
    3. If you simply manage to write in spoken language, you'll be ahead of 95% of writers. And it's so easy to do: just don't let a sentence through unless it's the way you'd say it to a friend.
  11. Dec 2018
    1. As with all of the arts, literature was once upon a time entirely made possible through patrons. This goes at least as far back as Shakespeare and Ben Jonson. They were able to write because their patrons provided them financial support. And this was of course true of all of the other arts. Beginning in the middle of the nineteenth century, however, literature and commerce got mixed.

      In some sense, there is a link between these areas of art/writing and funding and what we see in social media influencers who in some sense are trying to create an "art" for which they get paid. Sadly, most are not making art and worse, most of them are being paid even worse.

    1. like you kind of hide yourself in school but when you’re outside of school, it’s like you open yourself up. You unfold everything.

      Despite the fact this makes me sad, etc., to hear, it is beautifully said!

  12. Nov 2018
    1. by 2009, the rate for men was 61% higher than the rate for women.

      Careful, you're cherry-picking data here to make the results seem more dramatic. This appears to be just a fluctuation between 2007 and 2009, not an overall trend worth reporting.

    2. TBI-related death rates decreased from 2001 to 2010 from 5.2 to 4.3 deaths per 100,000 children aged four and younger, from 3.2 to 1.9 deaths per 100,000 adolescents aged five to 14, from 23.4 to 15.6 deaths per 100,000 individuals aged 15 to 24, and from 17.6 to 14.6 deaths per 100,000 adults aged 25 to 44.

      Again, you don't need to write this out.

    3. increased in individuals 65 years and older.

      This is interesting, and readers will want to know the leading theories. Deaths went down for all other age groups but went up among the elderly. Why? Ask a geriatric specialist for thoughts on this. I know you didn't have time for that sort of thing, but you should try to follow up and make this even stronger for your portfolio.

    4. TBI-related emergency department visits increased from a rate in 2001 of 420.6 per 100,000 people to 715.7 per 100,000 people in 2010. TBI-related hospitalizations increased from 2001 to 2010 from 82.7 per 100,000 people to 92.7 per 100,000 people. TBI-related deaths decreased from 2001 to 2010 from a rate of 18.5 deaths per 100,000 people to 17.1 deaths per 100,000 people.

      You don't need to write all of this out. That's what the chart is for -- it shows us all of this. And the title of the chart is awkward and confusing because of the commas ('ER Department, Hospitalizations, and Deaths...'). I think your missing the word 'visits.'

    1. Writing is selection. Just to start a piece of writing you have to choose one word and only one from more than a million in the language. Now keep going. What is your next word? Your next sentence, paragraph, section, chapter? Your next ball of fact. You select what goes in and you decide what stays out. At base you have only one criterion: If something interests you, it goes in—if not, it stays out. That’s a crude way to assess things, but it’s all you’ve got. Forget market research. Never market-research your writing. Write on subjects in which you have enough interest on your own to see you through all the stops, starts, hesitations, and other impediments along the way.

      This one is reminiscent of W. Zinsser's notes in On Writing Well. He makes the argument that one has to first trim out as much as possible, before considering adding back embellishments.

  13. Oct 2018
    1. (cf. Neal et al. 2012; Painter et al. 2002; Hearn et al. 1998).

      Potentially interesting further reading for blog post?

    2. Unfortunately, David Allen’s technique cannot simply be transferred to the task of insightful writing. The first reason is that GTD relies on clearly defined objectives, whereas insight cannot be predetermined by definition.

      Potentially interesting for blog post on process. How to apply GTD to writing?

    3. regularly check if our tasks still fit into the bigger picture

      Essential part of the PhD and research process in general.

    4. breaking down the amorphous task of “writing a paper” into small and clearly separated tasks

      That's it! One of the most difficult things about the PhD is that it is definitely an amorphous task!

    5. Planners are also unlikely to continue with their studies after they finish their examinations. They are rather glad it is over. Experts, on the other hand, would not even consider voluntarily giving up what has already proved to be rewarding and fun:

      This could be a hint for instructional design/approaching teaching?

    1. “One cannot think without writing.”

      This is important to take into account. Furthermore, connect with Austin Kleon's 'Share your work' in thinking about the process, not the product.

  14. Sep 2018
  15. Aug 2018
    1. In all these cases, the notion of temporal structuring through ongoing practices helps us understand and bridge the temporal oppositions underlying the research litera­ture. We tum now to an empirical example to demonstrate how this perspective can offer a new understanding of the temporal conditions and consequences of organizational life.

      Succint summation of previous section and transition.

    2. While adopting one side or the other of this dichotomy may offer re­searchers analytic advantages in their temporal studies of organizations, difficulties arise when these positions are treated-not as conceptual tools-but as inherent prop­erties of time. Focusing on one side or the other misses seeing how temporal structures emerge from and are em­bedded in the varied and ongoing social practices of peo­ple in different communities and historical periods, and at the same time how such temporal structures powerfully shape those practices in turn. By focusing on what or­ganizational members actually do, our practice-based per­spective on temporal structuring may offer new insights into how people construct and reconstruct the temporal conditions that shape their lives.

      Nice summation of how practice-based experiences of time are not well-served by treating the objective-subjective dichotomy as properties of time.

      Need for a different perspective to explore other emergent ways people engage with or experience time.

    3. Our purpose in this paper is to develop the basic out­lines of an alternative perspective on time in organiza­tions that is centered on people's recurrent practices that shape (and are shaped by) a set of temporal structures. We see this emphasis on human practices (as distinct from external force or subjective construction) as bridg­ing the current opposition between objective and subjec­tive conceptualizations of time, and thus as making pos­sible a new understanding of the temporal conditions and consequences of organizational life. By grounding our perspective in the dynamic capacities of human agency we believe we gain unique insights into the creation, use, and influence of time in organizations.

      Strong why does this matter section -- 3 sentences.

    4. In this paper we explicitly integrate the notion of social practices from this literature with that of enacted struc­tures drawn from the theory of structuration (Giddens 1984 ), arguing that the combination can be valuable for the study of organizations in general and of time in or­ganizations in particular. With respect to the latter, we have obtained important insights into how temporality is both produced in situated practices and reproduced through the influence of institutionalized norms.

      Turns of phrase:

      "We explicitly integrate the notion of social practices from this literature ..."

      "We have obtained important insights ..."

    5. We contribute to this discussion within organizational re­search by offering an alternative third view-that time is experienced in organizational life through a process of temporal structuring that characterizes people's everyday engagement in the world. As part of this engagement, people produce and reproduce what can be seen to be temporal structures to guide, orient, and coordinate their ongoing activities.

      How the concept of temporal structures fits in the literature.

    6. researchers explore the embodied. embedded. and mate­rial aspects of human agency in constituting particular social orders (Hutchins 1995, Lave 1988, Suchman 1987).

      Nice succinct high-level summary of DCog, LPP, and situated learning.

    1. You don't understand: You a jazz musician by default. And that just opened me up.

      I adore this, b/c this is one powerful aspect of literacy IN ACTION. The writer (artist, performer, singer, etc.) is doing something, feels it intuitively. Then a teacher, or peer or fellow collaborator helps them to name what they are doing. Call it author's craft, or technique, or approach. But it invites the learner/actor to do deeper into their craft and join the discourse of actors before them.

    2. And when you like a sound or an instrumental, you want to approach it the right way. So you sit on it.

      Every writer should read this paragraph. Sometimes you need to sit on it, give it time to marinate. So many ways to approach sitting on it, of course, but that's just glorious detail.

    3. It starts there first, before I even heard any type of melody or lyric. That's just DNA

      This is flat out a paen to absorbing literacies through the early experiences with our families and communities, but especially, especially our parents. Kendrick says it himself, his parents sharing their culture made his glorious unfolding possible.

    1. tossing white hair like a Pentateuchal prophet.

      Not only does the hairstyle imply age but his use of Pentateuchal provides a biblical reference to prophets that lived over 100 years.

    2. vaulting mode.

      Imagery of acceleration along with elevation and excitement.

    3. feeling squeezed in the form

      shows how he was forced to write in a certain way at The New Yorker Imagery of discomfort

    4. eliminating apocrypha

      Biblical reference here. Pretty clever

    5. That is no way to start a writing project, let me tell you. You begin with a subject, gather material, and work your way to structure from there. You pile up volumes of notes and then figure out what you are going to do with them, not the other way around

      He uses a personal anecdote about his writing experience to provide personal insight

    6. the busty Swede they expected turned into a short and bearded man.

      The verbiage in this portion also adds to the humor as the use of 'turned into' is unconventional

    7. the busty Swede

      Colloquial and keeps with the humorous writing already prevalent in the intro

    8. they didn’t give sex.

      Spontaneousness adds to the humor and is a creative way to begin to talk about such a subject.

    9. They massaged everything from college football players to arthritic ancients

      The use of everything instead of everyone dehumanizes their patients, both football players and arthritic ancients. Also, it adds humor to the statement in being so unconventional.

  16. Jul 2018
    1. We’re asking faculty to play “Icky Thump” when they haven’t mastered “Love Me Do.” We’re asking them to knit complex cables when they haven’t even combined knits and purls. We’re asking them to bomb down a black diamond run when they haven’t figured out how to stay upright on the green run.

      This is a grand, grand, grand piece of writing. Perhaps somewhere there's an open educator - rocker - knitter - skier who's not thrown by any of these terms, but for the rest of us at least one of these examples should be disorienting.

    1. Can't annotate stupid JSTOR page images. But: "When we read for typos, letters constitute the field of attention; content becomes virtually inaccessible. When we read for content, semantic structures constitute the field of attention; letters - for the most part - recede from our consciousness."

    1. Except that if the written assessment is such that it can be graded accurately by software, that’s probably not very good assessment. If what’s important are the facts and key concepts, won’t multiple-choice do?

      Terrific thought here. We don't teach good test design well enough and I suspect many faculty members, being people who test well, mistakenly conflate "multiple choice" with "easy" and "open ended" with "complex."

    2. Automated grading is supposed to “free” the instructor for other tasks, except there is no more important task.

      Absolutely vital for our understanding of grading and faculty work.

    1. "The idea is bananas, as far as I'm concerned," says Kelly Henderson, an English teacher at Newton South High School just outside Boston. "An art form, a form of expression being evaluated by an algorithm is patently ridiculous."
  17. Jun 2018
    1. nothingness haunts the text

      In Re-writing Freud by Simon Morris, words are randomly selected from Interpretation of Dreams, although "flashes of meaning persist, haunting the text."

    1. Digital Writing

      Is the phrase "digital writing" as fraught as "digital native"? Or has it morphed into just plain writing? I still find myself bridging the gap analog -digital gap. For example, a summer goal is to make annotation of pdf's as close to paper as I can. I invested in a reMarkable tablet to make this happen. Do I consider it "digital writing"--yes and no. It is the merging of digital and analog. I do it so as to have less friction and quicker feedback with students. None of this matters if students can't take in the feedback or if my feedback sucks, but that is another pedagogic and compositional concern.

  18. Apr 2018
    1. Some characters were given simplified glyphs, called shinjitai (新字体). Many variant forms of characters and obscure alternatives for common characters were officially discouraged.

      The simplification of Japanese kanji was done to a lesser extent than that of the Chinese hanzi.

    1. His parents had abandoned their property in the Cuban province of Camagüey to become janitors in Los Angeles, to give their three children a new country.

      Dominguez's parents were willing to sacrifice their way of life for their son.

  19. Mar 2018
    1. To facilitate and promote the writing, publishing, and reading of literature in electronic media.

      I think that ELO's definition pretty much sums up what E-Lit, or Electronic Literature is. And I think that this concept is only going to grow bigger, and become the new norm for future generations.

  20. Feb 2018
  21. Jan 2018
    1. Chiang: There’s a passage in Annie Dillard’s The Writing Life where she’s telling her neighbor that she hates writing and would rather do anything else, and her neighbor says, “That’s like a guy who works in a factory all day, and hates it.” Writing is so difficult for me that I have often wondered whether I’m actually suited for it, and I’ve had experiences with the publishing industry that made me quit writing for years. But I keep coming back to it because, I suppose, writing is an essential part of who I am. As for advice to slow writers, I’d say that writing is not a race. This isn’t a situation where only the most prolific writers get an audience; publish your story when you’re ready, and it will find readers.
    1. After winning the Forward prize, Vuong told the Guardian that he suspected dyslexia runs in his family, but felt it had positively affected his writing: “I think perhaps the disability helped me a bit, because I write very slowly and see words as objects. I’m always trying to look for words inside words. It’s so beautiful to me that the word laughter is inside slaughter.”
    2. Vuong, who now lives in Massachusetts and works as an assistant professor in the MFA Program for Poets and Writers at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, only gained a taste for poetry in his 20s
    3. Born in Saigon, Vuong spent a year in a refugee camp as a baby and migrated to America when he was two years old, where he was raised by his mother, grandmother and aunt. Two aspects of Vuong’s life – his sexuality and the absence of his father – recur in his work
  22. Nov 2017
    1. Wm Jones

      Personally, I did not believe the Democratic Writing Project to be helpful or well designed. It is a good idea but it would have been more beneficial if this conversation took place out loud among a class, rather than online. I will never read any annotations outside of my own and the four that I will comment on, and that is upsetting. This is nothing more than a way to force everyone to participate and have something tangible to grade, and the students are not retaining the value of analyzing this document. I think this would have been better if we all read it at home and we compared physical annotations in class.

    1. the ever-changing digital landscape

      I think of myself as a Moffett guy, in that early on in my teaching I found the notion of "Teaching the Universe of Discourse" and exciting and clear map for building curriculum and for assessing my students' progress at any moment. I learned to focus on a balance of the different kinds of writing in the UNIVERSE of discourse. When I began to think about what it meant to teach digital writing, I returned to Moffett's notion of looking at the range of possibility. And as the words here, "ever-changing" and "landscape," suggest, we can constantly be thinking about what to include in our digital curriculum. Snapchat? Instagram? Is blogging still an important part of the landscape? What does it mean to have more characters available on Twitter? Do my students need more time in something like a Google community with short, interactive online conversation or do they need to slow down a bit and create a web page? It's exciting to be playing in this field, and it's even more exciting when youth recognize that they can choose where they want to play and make a difference digitally as well -- and what they need to learn to have an impact digitally.

  23. Oct 2017
    1. Amazon.com : You're annotated out there. Gibson: Yeah it's sort of like there's this nebulous extended text.
    2. Well, I worried about that. I sometimes don't like to confess how little I know about these things when I start them, but I'm starting to admit to myself that the less I know at the beginning probably the better it's going to go.
  24. www.townofsananselmo.org www.townofsananselmo.org
    1. —Writing Lab

      Good resource for students seeking jobs or needing a refresher on basic writing skills.

    1. Emden, C. (1998). Establishing a ‘track record’: Research productivity and nursing academe.Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing,16(1), 29–33

      Discusses the adequacy of writing training and support in PhD programmes.

    1. Kamler, Barbara. 2008. “Rethinking Doctoral Publication Practices: Writing from and beyond the Thesis.” Studies in Higher Education 33 (3): 283–94. doi:10.1080/03075070802049236.

  25. Sep 2017
    1. These posts are our travel stories.

      The author shapes their writing by being personal to where the audience can relate to them on a closer level.

    1. Indeed, as noted earlier, one well-known thought-enhancement technology is written language itself and perhaps use of language more generally. As Levy writes, “speech does not merely allow us to articulate thoughts that we would have had in any case. Instead, it allows us to externalize our thoughts and thereby treat them as objects for contemplation and manipulation. Externalized thoughts can be worked over, criticized, and improved.”21:38-39

      This is an interesting concept, particularly with regards to writing, because many people, myself included, think as they write. I often times do not even really know what I think about a topic until I start writing about it. Essays, for example, are usually difficult to start, but I end up figuring out what my argument is by the end because the process of writing itself has allowed me to think through the subject in a way normal biological cognition would not normally allow me to.

    1. Seven of the ‘arts’ students described a process of this sort, compared with only twoof the ‘science’ students. There was, however, another approach to revision, involvingonly one revision cycle. This was mentioned by five interviewees, four of whom werefrom ‘science’ backgrounds. Um ... rewriting? No. I can probably, once I’ve got the, I’ve got the feel of it, it probablytakes me a couple of hours to write, and then, shuffling stuff around, ... it’ll probably takeme, I don’t know, a morning or something to do a fair draft of it. (Ewan, 2002, science)Only one ‘arts’ student mentioned using a single revision cycle, and he had originallygraduated in science before starting his OU arts study

      science vs arts revision cycles: science students one draft; arts multiple moving things around.

    2. Although some ‘science’ students reported similar problems, it was only ‘science’students who talked in terms of ‘padding out’ their answers in order to reach therequired length: I’m more this, get all the facts down, yes it’s only three hundred words, but that’s it in anutshell. And it’s a lot harder then to flower it up to say either five hundred words or athousand words. (Larry, 2002, science)I’m not used to waffling I think that’s the problem. A lot of the art students say oh I’vewritten too much, ... and I have the opposite problem I kind of write down what Ithink the answer’s and I’ve only got like 200 words and I have to pad it out. (Ruth,2003, science)The tendency for some ‘science’ students to write relatively short essays may berelated to their conceptions of knowledge. If it is seen as factual, then once the factshave been stated, the student might see the task as complete; as Larry said, ‘that’s itin a nutshell’. If knowledge is relativistic, however, then competing views are equallyworthy of consideration and greater elaboration is needed to make a case

      how science students see "waffling"

    3. While the ‘arts’ students frequently described a strug-gle to make their essay ‘flow’, the ‘science’ students did not talk about textual struc-ture as problematic

      science students don't see structure as an issue; arts students do.

    4. North, Sarah. 2005. “Different Values, Different Skills? A Comparison of Essay Writing by Students from Arts and Science Backgrounds.” Studies in Higher Education 30 (5): 517–33. doi:10.1080/03075070500249153.

    5. ‘However’ is a textual theme with the function of indicating the relationship of theclause to the preceding text; ‘it is apparent’ is an interpersonal theme with the func-tion of indicating the writer’s stance towards the proposition that follows; ‘during thesecond half of the sixteenth century’ is an experiential theme providing informationabout circumstances surrounding the event or situation. In the discussion that followsI refer to these three types of non-subject theme as orienting themes. Unlike thesubject, none of them is grammatically compulsory and their use reflects a choicemade by the writer about how to frame the proposition presented within the clausecomplex.These orienting themes were consistently more common in the ‘arts’ students’essays, and the difference between the two groups was highly significant (t= 2.865,p < 0.006). ‘Arts’ students used on average 31.50 textual and 15.14 interpersonalelements in every 100 clause complexes, compared to 24.28 textual and 9.75 inter-personal elements for the ‘science’ group. They also tended to use more clausecomplexes containing an experiential orienting theme, although this difference wasnot significant. Since essays which used more orienting themes were also significantlymore likely to receive a higher mark (t= 2.336, p< 0.023), it is clearly worth investi-gating further the differing ways in which these were deployed by ‘arts’ and ‘science’students.

      Very interesting. This agrees with my experience that Science students have a lot of trouble with signposting!

    6. Such tutor comments suggest that ‘science’ students are less ready to criticallyevaluate source material, a feature that can be related to the tendency already notedin their writing to downplay the role of human interpretation in the construction ofknowledge

      This whole section so agrees with my read on this! What an amazing bit of research to show specifically what the hunch was.

    1. Elizabeth, as we have seen, understands marriage as progressive, parallel to and inextricable from internal growth; Charlotte, by contrast, regards her internal narrative of growth and her social life as a single and then married woman as two separate strands: people are as likely to grow apart as grow together

      Moe reiterates her main argument towards the end of her article to pick up momentum and emphasize her thoughts.

  26. Aug 2017
    1. Focusing on the fundamentals of grammar is one approach to teaching writing.

      CUE ELA Protocols +UDL Research and background information that can be used to provide support for the use of the protocols

  27. Jul 2017
    1. For design this is a crucial factor, and a profound change. The designer of such ‘pages’ / sites is no longer the ‘author’ of an authoritative text, but is a provider of material arranged in relation to the assumed characteristics of the imagined audience. The power of the designer is to assemble materials which can become ‘information’ for the visitor, in arrangements which might correspond to the interests of the visitor. For the visitor however “Information is material which is selected by individuals to be transformed by them into knowledge to solve a problem in their life world” (Boeck, 2002)
  28. May 2017
    1. Within a couple of decades Strunk was a full professor of English, and decided to privately publish a little book called The Elements of Style (1918).

      Such a famous book! (For nerds!)

    1. simultaneous

      Technology has changed this drastically. With the growing popularity of videos, podcast, and even radio shows, an audience doesn't even have to be in a specific setting to hear a speaker. This update in speaking access has definitely bridged the gap between writing and speaking.

    1. learns to talk

      I have to disagree with this point that writing cannot be "natural." Yes, generally everyone learns how to speak, while some don't event learn how to write. But, the percent that do learn about writing can translate information more "naturally" because they can better explain their thoughts. If he the point is that talking is more a "natural" function, but it has to be learned just like writing. Just not as intense.

    2. technology of writing

      Interesting phrasing here. The way I'm reading this is that writing has turned into a luxury or something that others need to develop for us.

  29. Apr 2017
    1. joy

      Her description of the writing process reminds of Douglass' recounting of when he first learned to read. Reading was painful for him at first, because he realized the extent of his oppression, but it becomes a tool for liberation.

  30. Mar 2017