132 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2024
  2. May 2024
  3. Mar 2024
  4. Jan 2024
    1. Jordan Nicholas Sukut's Lionsberg Wiki has approximately 1.3M words which could be turned into a NeoBook. He calls it a "wiki book".

      https://lionsberg.wiki/

  5. Dec 2023
    1. https://docs.google.com/document/d/15gI7LozljTOvo_7oUwfnOIwfzD8O0VHVgWGr0oK3RI0/edit

      When comparing, one ought to take careful account of the variety of wikis and their uses (both public and private) and not fall into the availability heuristic of thinking that all wikis are used and managed like Wikipedia solely because it is one of the biggest and most popular ones.

      Some individual users slowly build their personal wikis a note at a time, but instead of linking one note to another, they place it onto a page near related ideas, which may tend to create articles over time. (Sounds a bit like folgezettel, no?) See Ward Cunningham’s (the creator of the idea of wiki) wiki for this: https://wiki.c2.com/

      Many public TiddlyWiki’s, in part because of design, are created as short note/card-based ideas which may slowly accumulate from notes to articles as well. See my own example: https://tw.boffosocko.com/

      It may take some digging in to find public versions, but many FedWiki sites have a very note (or card-based) root design rather than an article-based design: http://fed.wiki.org/view/federated-wiki

      Bill Seitz’s public wiki is broadly a melange of all these patterns as well: http://webseitz.fluxent.com/wiki/BillSeitz

      For additional contrast and comparison, see also: - https://indieweb.org/Zettelk%C3%A4sten - https://indieweb.org/digital_garden - https://indieweb.org/commonplace_book

      Looking at a variety of specific examples in practice will tend to be far more fruitful than considering a tiny handful of theoretical (and potentially non-existent) examples, particularly in light of the massive bias which is created by the existence of Wikipedia.

  6. Sep 2023
    1. https://kairos.technorhetoric.net/2.1/features/brent/index.htm

      An interesting commonplace book-like old school website with an actual "index" and fascinatingly about "Rhetorics of the Web"!

      Example of a collected quote: https://kairos.technorhetoric.net/2.1/features/brent/burke.htm

      Note also the linked ideas at the bottom of this example.

      It also has a references section: https://kairos.technorhetoric.net/2.1/features/brent/referenc.htm

      The separations of the pieces and their form is very reminiscent of a zettelkasten and the building up of pieces in places almost admits to a hand-built wiki.

  7. Aug 2023
    1. The slip box needs a number of years in order to reach critical mass. Until then, it functions as a mere container from which we can retrieve what we put in. This changes with its growth in size and complexity.

      Niklas Luhmann indicates that it may take a number of years to reach critical mass. This may be different for everyone based on the number of ideas they place into it and the amount of work they do in creating connections.

      Ward Cunningham, the creator of the wiki, has indicated that he thinks it takes roughly 500 pages in a wiki for the value to begin emerging.†

      How many notes and what level of links/complexity is a good minimal threshold for one to be able to see interesting and useful results?


      † Quote in FedWiki session on 2021-12-29

  8. May 2023
  9. Jan 2023
    1. Gwern’s suggestion for how to design internet communities to allow for conversation on different time scales:

      While done in the framing of Reddit, this general pattern is the one that is generally seen in the IndieWeb community with their online chat and wiki.

      Chat rooms + wiki = conversational ratchet for community goals

    2. But keeping a notebook with someone else is hard. The few times I’ve tried with people not married to me, the notebooks have degenerated into slums. People will usually build their own corners, afraid to mess with the words others have put in. And so the thoughts are not properly integrated, they just sprawl, and are not tended to with love. And if someone does try to integrate the collective thoughts, if someone edits other people’s notes when they are away—well, there are few things as frustrating as having someone mess up your structure of thought so it becomes less useful to you.

      Shared group note taking can be difficult as the notes one makes are often very personal and geared toward one's own particular path and needs.

      Group note taking may be easier within a marriage or a company or custom group (particularly as actors are closer to each other in a shared unit) as actors are striving to increase both their shared context as well as their shared priorities and goals.

  10. Dec 2022
    1. It’s fairly clear now that the current catalog process is too heavyweight. I hope we can move to a lighter workflow in the future that feels more like editing a wiki.
    1. https://borretti.me/article/unbundling-tools-for-thought

      He covers much of what I observe in the zettelkasten overreach article.

      Missing is any discussion of exactly what problem he's trying to solve other than perhaps, I want to solve them all and have a personal log of everything I've ever done.

      Perhaps worth reviewing again to pull out specifics, but I just don't have the bandwidth today.

    1. At the abstract level of empirical investigation concerned with the theory of science is communication with slip boxes certainly only one of many possibilities. The accidents of reading play a role just as much as misunderstandings resulting from interdisciplinary thought processes. We can confirm hat communication with slip boxes may be considered as a functional equivalent and that this approach, compared to others, has many advantages as far as speed, and mutual adaptability is concerned.

      Otras posibilidades son chatbots y wikis, entre las variantes descritas acá, dentro de las muchas posibles y por explorar.

    2. Naturally, independence presupposes a minimal measure of intrinsic complexity. The slip box needs a number of years in order to reach critical mass. Until then, it functions as a mere container from which we can retrieve what we put in. This changes with its growth in size and complexity. On the one hand, the number of approaches and occasions for questions increases. The slip box becomes a universal instrument. You can place almost everything in it, and this not just ad hoc and in isolation, but with internal possibilities of connections [with other contents]. It becomes a sensitive system that internally reacts to many ideas, as long as they can be noted down. If we ask, for instance, why on the one hand museums are empty, while on the other hand exhibitions of paintings by Monet, Picasso, or Medici are too crowded, the slip box accepts this question under the perspective of “preference for what is temporally limited.”

      Un sistema de preguntas y emergencias similares se puede hacer cuando el slipbox tiene otras materialidades. En mi caso, suelo enviarme mensajes de texto/voz a mí mismo (principalmente vía Telegram), con la esperanza futura de que las pueda tenerlas con un chatbot (en otra red) y que mi yo futuro implementará esas conversaciones algorítmicas, las interconexiones con otros ecosistemas digitales y humanos y las transiciones hacia ellas.

    3. If you wish to educate a partner in communication, it will be good to provide him with independence from the beginning. A slip box, which has been made according to the suggestions just given can exhibit great independence. There may be equally apt ways to reach this goal. The described reduction to a fixed, but merely formal order of placement and the resulting combination of order and disorder is, however, one of these ways.

      Otra de las posibilidades para dar autonomía a ese compañero de comunicación es a través de agencia algorítimica progresiva. A comienzos del milenio proponía un chatbot conectado a chats comunitarios (tipo IRC, en aquella época algo que hoy muestra ChatGPT) y ahora sería chatbots conectados con microwikis.

    4. As a result of extensive work with this technique a kind of secondary memory will arise, an alter ego with who we can constantly communicate. It proves to be similar to our own memory in that it does not have a thoroughly constructed order of its entirety, not hierarchy, and most certainly no linear structure like a book. Just because of this, it gets its own life, independent of its author. The entirety of these notes can only be described as a disorder, but at the very least it is a disorder with non-arbitrary internal structure. Some things will get lost (versickern), some notes we will never see again. On the other hand, there will be preferred centers, formation of lumps and regions with which we will work more often than with others. There will be complexes of ideas that are conceived at large, but which will never be completed; there will be incidental ideas which started as links from secondary passages and which are continuously enriched and expand so that they will tend increasingly to dominate system. To sum up: this technique guarantees that its order which is merely formal does not become a hindrance but adapts to the conceptual development.

      Esta otredad de la memoria y la emergencia de un yo "distinto", histórico y flexible para dialogar, ocurre también con los wikis y los outliners. Y lo vi pasar en mi caso con El Directorio, TiddlyWiki, Leo, e incluso con Hypotesis y la lectura anotada.

      Lepiter y otras herramientas ayudan a navegar las agrupaciones temáticas de notas enlazadas, pero la pérdida constante de información, por ejemplom en equipos robados, discos duros que no se revisan, backups inaccesibles, plataformas que cambian, ha sido una constante de esta memoria digital. En alguna medida he aceptado esa pérdida como un proceso de aprendizaje y desprendimiento, como un jardín zen que me(¿nos?) prepara para memorias más resilientes y conexas y exploraciones más colectivas de las mismas.

    5. The fixed filing place needs no system. It is sufficient that we give every slip a number which is easily seen (in or case on the left of the first line) and that we never change this number and thus the fixed place of the slip. This decision about structure is that reduction of the complexity of possible arrangements, which makes possible the creation of high complexity in the card file and thus makes possible its ability to communicate in the first place.

      Para el caso de TiddlyWiki, Leo, Grafoscopio, Lepiter y similares, esta indexación secuencial ocurre a través de los metadatos y es invisible. Cuando se hace visible, esa indexación es de difícil recordación para los humanos (ejp fecha con precisión de nanosegundos). Un índice sencillo (ejp: secuencial y letra, tiene altas probabilidades de colisión) y una con bajas probabilidades de colisión (por ejemplo NanoID, que implementamos en MiniDocs) no es muy memorable.

      Desafortunadamente, sólo múltiples indexaciones garantizan baja probabilidades de colisión y memorabilidad, de modo que los unos disminuyan las falencias de los otros y actualizarían las posibilidades del Zettelkasten cuando el archivo está distribuido en distintas máquinas en lugar de un sólo un espacio físico.

    6. Applied to collections of notes, we can choose the route of thematic specialization (such as notes about governmental liability) or we can choose the route of an open organization. We decided for the latter. After more than twenty-six years of successful and only occasionally difficult co-operation, we can now vouch for the success or at least the viability of this approach. Naturally, the route that creates a partner in communication that is meant for the long haul, is open, and not thematically limited (but only limiting itself), makes certain structural demands on the partners. You might, given the great trust that is still being put in the abilities of human beings, trust that I fulfill these presuppositions. But what about the slip box? How must it be conceived that he will acquire the corresponding communicative competence?

      En el caso de los wikis y la escritura de prosa que se entrelaza con código, esa agencia de cooperantes humanos y maquínico-algortímicos, deposita parte de la confianza en los formatos y algoritmos abiertos, que hacen la información indexable, computable y emergente,

  11. Oct 2022
    1. TiddlyWiki was inspired by @WardCunningham's glorious idea of wiki – more than anything by the way that wiki makes linking be part of the punctuation of writing.

      TiddlyWiki was inspired by @WardCunningham's glorious idea of wiki – more than anything by the way that wiki makes linking be part of the punctuation of writing. https://t.co/pLPfYcCJY2

      — TiddlyWiki (@TiddlyWiki) September 20, 2022
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
  12. Sep 2022
  13. Aug 2022
    1. On the Internet there are many collective projects where users interact only by modifying local parts of their shared virtual environment. Wikipedia is an example of this.[17][18] The massive structure of information available in a wiki,[19] or an open source software project such as the FreeBSD kernel[19] could be compared to a termite nest; one initial user leaves a seed of an idea (a mudball) which attracts other users who then build upon and modify this initial concept, eventually constructing an elaborate structure of connected thoughts.[20][21]

      Just as eusocial creatures like termites create pheromone infused mudballs which evolve into pillars, arches, chambers, etc., a single individual can maintain a collection of notes (a commonplace book, a zettelkasten) which contains memetic seeds of ideas (highly interesting to at least themselves). Working with this collection over time and continuing to add to it, modify it, link to it, and expand it will create a complex living community of thoughts and ideas.

      Over time this complexity involves to create new ideas, new structures, new insights.

      Allowing this pattern to move from a single person and note collection to multiple people and multiple collections will tend to compound this effect and accelerate it, particularly with digital tools and modern high speed communication methods.

      (Naturally the key is to prevent outside selfish interests from co-opting this behavior, eg. corporate social media.)

    1. "Why have a locked wiki when you can instead just post static Web pages?"

      What even is a locked wiki insofar as the ways it differs from traditional (pre-wiki) content publishing pipelines? Where's the wiki part of it?

  14. Jul 2022
  15. www.bookstackapp.com www.bookstackapp.com
    1. https://www.bookstackapp.com/

      mentioned by Jim Groom as one of the most popular wiki software available on Github

      BookStack is a simple, self-hosted, easy-to-use platform for organising and storing information

    1. To make a page on MySpace, all it took was text in a textbox.The text could be words or code.Anyone could read the words and see the code.
  16. Jun 2022
    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWkwOefBPZY

      Some of the basic outline of this looks like OER (Open Educational Resources) and its "five Rs": Retain, Reuse, Revise, Remix and/or Redistribute content. (To which I've already suggested the sixth: Request update (or revision control).

      Some of this is similar to:

      The Read Write Web is no longer sufficient. I want the Read Fork Write Merge Web. #osb11 lunch table. #diso #indieweb [Tantek Çelik](http://tantek.com/2011/174/t1/read-fork-write-merge-web-osb110

      Idea of collections of learning as collections or "playlists" or "readlists". Similar to the old tool Readlist which bundled articles into books relatively easily. See also: https://boffosocko.com/2022/03/26/indieweb-readlists-tools-and-brainstorming/

      Use of Wiki version histories

      Some of this has the form of a Wiki but with smaller nuggets of information (sort of like Tiddlywiki perhaps, which also allows for creating custom orderings of things which had specific URLs for displaying and sharing them.) The Zettelkasten idea has some of this embedded into it. Shared zettelkasten could be an interesting thing.

      Data is the new soil. A way to reframe "data is the new oil" but as a part of the commons. This fits well into the gardens and streams metaphor.

      Jerry, have you seen Matt Ridley's work on Ideas Have Sex? https://www.ted.com/talks/matt_ridley_when_ideas_have_sex Of course you have: https://app.thebrain.com/brains/3d80058c-14d8-5361-0b61-a061f89baf87/thoughts/3e2c5c75-fc49-0688-f455-6de58e4487f1/attachments/8aab91d4-5fc8-93fe-7850-d6fa828c10a9

      I've heard Jerry mention the idea of "crystallization of knowledge" before. How can we concretely link this version with Cesar Hidalgo's work, esp. Why Information Grows.

      Cross reference Jerry's Brain: https://app.thebrain.com/brains/3d80058c-14d8-5361-0b61-a061f89baf87/thoughts/4bfe6526-9884-4b6d-9548-23659da7811e/notes

  17. May 2022
    1. Scott, I'll spend some more in-depth time with it shortly, but in a quick skim of topics I pleasantly notice a few citations of my own work. Perhaps I've done a poor job communicating about wikis, but from what I've seen from your work thus far I take much the same view of zettelkasten as you do. Somehow though I find that you're quoting me in opposition to your views? While you're broadly distinguishing against the well-known Wikipedia, and rightly so, I also broadly consider (unpublished) and include examples of small personal wikis and those within Ward Cunningham's FedWiki space, though I don't focus on them in that particular piece. In broad generalities most of these smaller wikis are closer to the commonplace and zettelkasten traditions, though as you point out they have some structural functional differences. You also quote me as someone in "information theory" in a way that that indicates context collapse. Note that my distinctions and work in information theory relate primarily to theoretical areas in electrical engineering, physics, complexity theory, and mathematics as it relates to Claude Shannon's work. It very specifically does not relate to my more humanities focused work within intellectual history, note taking, commonplaces, rhetoric, orality, or memory. In these areas, I'm better read than most, but have no professional title(s). Can't wait to read the entire piece more thoroughly...

    1. https://www.otherlife.co/pkm/

      The PKM space has gotten crazy, but mostly through bad practice, lack of history, and hype. There are a few valid points I see mirrored here, but on the whole this piece is broadly off base due to a lack of proper experience, practice and study. I definitely would recommend he take a paid course to fix the issue, but delve more deeply into recommended historical practices.

  18. Apr 2022
    1. I have just over 1000 notes, going back over 10yrs. Style has changed significantly over time. Only 300-400 are “wiki style”. Started digital daily notes about 2 yrs ago - before that was on paper.
    1. https://blog.kowalczyk.info/

      <small><cite class='h-cite ht'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Dave Gauer</span> in Inspiration for the virtual box of cards - ratfactor (<time class='dt-published'>02/27/2022 14:21:56</time>)</cite></small>

    1. https://wiki.nikitavoloboev.xyz/

      <small><cite class='h-cite ht'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Dave Gauer</span> in Inspiration for the virtual box of cards - ratfactor (<time class='dt-published'>02/27/2022 14:21:56</time>)</cite></small>

    1. http://ratfactor.com/cards/

      Dave Gauer has nascent digital zettelkasten on his website though he calls them a virtual box of cards "(as opposed to 'zettelkasten' or 'wiki' or 'notes')".

      Given it's limited extent, the collection presents in a more wiki like fashion with such limited functionality (on the front end) that it appears more like a loose collection of web pages.

      What are the generally accepted distinctions between all these forms?

    1. Do you manage “wiki”-type notes and permanent notes separately? .t3_uapyj9._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; }

      I personally and always recommend people keep separate folders for zettelkasten and wiki like patterns primarily because you could and should be using each of them in dramatically different ways. If you're putting your zettelkasten notes into a wiki setting, then you're starting to actively place those notes into a final written form (Ahrens calls these "projects" in his book How to Take Smart Notes as a catchall for articles, chapters, books, or other long form writing.)

    1. To drive this point home:

      I sometimes get people who balk at my characterization of GitHub-style anti-wikis as being inferior to, you know, actual wikis. "You can just use the GitHub UI to edit the files", they'll sometimes say.

      A case study: a couple days ago, I noticed that the lone link in the current README for Jeff Zucker's solid-rest project is a 404. I made a note of it. Just now, I reset my GitLab password, logged in to solid/chat, and notified Jeff https://gitter.im/solid/chat?at=611976c009a1c273827b3bd1. Jeff's response was, "I'll change it".

      This case is rich with examples of what makes unwikis so goddamn inefficient to work with. First, my thought upon finding the broken link was to take note of it (i.e. so that it can eventually be taken care of) rather than fixing it immediately, as would have been the case with a wiki. More on this in a bit. Secondly, my eventual action was still not something that directly addressed the problem—it was to notify someone else† of the problem so that it might be fixed by them, due to the unwiki nature of piles of Git-managed markdown. Thirdly, even Jeff's reflex is not to immediately change it—much like my reaction, his is to note the need for a fix himself and then to tell me he's going to change it, which he will presumably eventually do. Tons of rigamarole just to get a link fixed‡ that remains broken even after having gone through all this.

      † Any attempt to point the finger at me here (i.e. coming up short from having taken the wrong action—notifying somebody rather than doing it myself) would be getting it wrong. First, the fact that I can't just make an edit without taking into account the myriad privacy issues that GitHub presents is materially relevant! Secondly, even if I had been willing to ignore that thorn (or jump through the necessary hoops to work around it) and had used the GitHub web UI as prescribed, it still would have ended up as a request for someone else to actually take action on, because I don't control the project.

      ‡ Any attempt to quibble here that I'm talking about changing a README and not (what GitHub considers) a wiki page gets it wrong. We're here precisely because GitHub's unwikis are a bunch of files of markdown. The experience of changing an unwiki page would be rife with the same problems as encountered here.

    1. Yes, the website itself is a project that welcomes contributions. If you’d like to add information, fix errors, or make improvements (especially to the visual design), talk to @ivanreese in the Slack or open a PR.

      Contribution: make it a wiki. (An actual wiki, not GitHub-style anti-wikis.)

    1. Each entry is a Markdown file stored in the _pages directory.

      Nah, dude. That's not a wiki.

  19. Mar 2022
    1. Beyond the log, I’m still trying to find the best mix between a traditional personal "knowledge base" in the form of a text file wiki versus a zettelkasten (wikipedia.org) versus this website.

      Example of someone thinking about the differences between their wiki, a zettelkasten, and a website.

    1. There are way too many dipshits who are way too happy to come out of the woodwork when this topic is brought up to try to drop an FYI wisdom nugget on you about how github.com will let you skip a few of these steps and do the edit/commit thing directly in your browser. Great job on almost entirely missing the point, morons. Let's be excruciatingly clear:

      If, at any point, "submit a PR" comes up during an explanation of how to do a run-of-the-mill edit on your project's wiki, then your project does not have a wiki.

  20. Feb 2022
    1. Students should not only learn to write papers, butalso learn facts, be able to discuss their ideas in seminars and listencarefully to lectures

      I wonder if there are any labs which not only have journal clubs, but have a shared note taking system or zettelkasten as well to keep as a community resource.

      I'm sure there are probably a few lab wikis in existence.

      Are professors keeping public note collections that they share with students or fellow researchers?

  21. Jan 2022
  22. Dec 2021
    1. Massive Wiki is a movement to create a wiki ecosystem (rather than just one engine) that provides classic wiki utility, with a plurality of tools and processes that enable decentralization and federation of the pages.

      This looks like a fascinating tool. Similar in function to what @Flancian is attempting to do?

      Perhaps I'll tinker with it soon...

    1. Even more important is that all this isn’t about the software. It is about the system you set up. Some software nudges you, sometimes even pushes you, towards system design decisions. Take Wikis as an example. Most of them have two different modes: The reading mode. The editing mode. The reading mode is the default. But most of the time you should create, edit and re-edit the content. This default, this separation of reading and editing, is a small but significant barrier on producing content. You will behave differently. This is one reason I don’t like wikis for knowledge work. They are clumsy and work better for different purposes.

      Most wikis have a user interface problem between their read and edit modes. Switching between the two creates additional and unnecessary friction for placing content and new information into them.

  23. Nov 2021
    1. I am going to rework my website to an information site rather than blog, and include all the new stuff I am doing including the languages, archaeology, applications to education and a very recent approach linking the mnemonic technologies to human evolutionary genetics.

      Perhaps a wiki (single or multiple user) would be a better tool for this?

  24. Sep 2021
    1. Why shouldn't an IntegratedDevelopmentEnvironment be like Wiki?

      Efforts in that very sense are being done by the GToolkit

  25. Aug 2021
    1. Taking turns at hosting shared the administrative load and the benefits that accrued. It was considered good practice to read all the submissions and craft your own post that would link to them, possibly exercising some selection, in a way that might entice readers to see for themselves. In that respect, because they were curated, blog carnivals to me are distinct from planets that merely accrete stuff, admittedly on a topic, without curation.

      This almost sounds like the creation of a wiki page, but in blog format.

    1. Sounds like Dave Winer is tinkering around getting Little Outliner to work with Roam or Roam like structures? He certainly might have some useful ideas for Flancian in terms of cobbling together all these note taking / wiki-like platforms.

    1. http://www.connectedtext.com/manfred.php

      A nice essay about note taking in general, the author's long history using many methods including index cards and a variety of digital versions. Ultimately he settled on a private desktop wiki called ConnectedText.

      He talks about Luhmann's zettelkasten and some of the pros/cons as well as things that can be left out when implemented in a digital version like ConnectedText.

      He's reasonably connected to the tradition of note taking, though doesn't seem to be as steeped in the Renaissance traditions of commonplace books specifically.

    2. A wiki allows one to build increasingly more complex relationships between what might appear to be at first unrelated bits and pieces of information. The motto that characterizes this approch is: "It's not the data, it's the relationship" and it certainly rings true for me in the context of note-taking.
  26. edwardbetts.com edwardbetts.com
    1. Edward Betts is using his website as a commonplace book of sorts with a wide variety of topic headings based on his reading.

      He also keeps a separate wiki: https://edwardbetts.com/wiki/

  27. Jul 2021
    1. Wikilinks are great because they allow for very easy linking: you just [[link it as you go along]], then the link either works (because someone wrote that node/article/resource already) or you can click through and backfill it. I call this procedure link-driven writing. Whenever there is more than one [[node]] with a given wikilink in an Agora (typical use case: notes kept on a certain topic by different users), the Agora will surface all of them when resolving the wikilink in question.

      What if browsers could allow the user to click and choose the resolving resource for a wikilink in much the way that they allow one to choose their search provider? Then one might have the option to choose between the [[agora]] or their own personal wiki for the search?

  28. Jun 2021
    1. I've run into Phil Jones in the digital gardens telegram group, but not looked very closely at [[Cardigan Bay]] before.

      Based on the idea of teh [[Smallest Federated Wiki]], Cardigan Bay is a wiki engine in Clojure which can be found on GitHub at interstar/cardigan-bay.

      Be sure to invite Jones to [[Gardens and Streams II]].

    1. Reflecting on how new digital tools have re-invigorated annotation and contributed to the creation of their recent book, they suggest annotation presents a vital means by which academics can re-engage with each other and the wider world.

      I've been seeing some of this in the digital gardening space online. People are actively hosting their annotations, thoughts, and ideas, almost as personal wikis.

      Some are using RSS and other feeds as well as Webmention notifications so that these notebooks can communicate with each other in a realization of Vanmevar Bush's dream.

      Networked academic samizdat anyone?

  29. May 2021
    1. Keeping your garden on the open web also sets you up to take part in the future of gardening. At the moment our gardens are rather solo affairs. We haven't figure out how to make them multi-player. But there's an enthusiastic community of developers and designers trying to fix that. It's hard to say what kind of libraries, frameworks, and design patterns might emerge out of that effort, but it certainly isn't going to happen behind a Medium paywall.

      There are a few of us using Webmention for this. Similarly there are some running open wikis or experiments like Flancian's agora.

  30. Mar 2021
    1. The Obsidian vault that I've created for the students is secure (by invitation only in Dropbox) and THEY CAN CONTRIBUTE to it. I've put the questions for discussion in the content sections, and have asked students to answer the questions on the page. This hasn't resulted in the types of threaded discussions I was hoping for, but improvements to the interface and better questions will hopefully lead to that.

      This is similar to teachers in the last two decades creating class wikis which students can add to.

      I'm curious how the differences in user interface with Obsidian may actually make this process simpler and easier. With all of these experiments, some of the issue may be the learning curve of using the new tool, so having simpler UIs certainly goes a long way.

      The side benefit of some of these is that students (within a Domain of One's Own space), might see the power and value of these systems in their introduction and then take and use these tools in their learning and working lives thereafter.

  31. Oct 2020
    1. (This is a much better question for @sphygmus, who seems to have a dope Webmention setup for her TiddlyWiki.)

      Webmention in general is certainly dope.

      In looking at her set up, it looks like she's used her site to sign into Aaron Parecki's https://webmention.io/ service which gives the site two link elements to put into the <header> of the site. Webmention.io then does all the plumbing for the site and allows you to log into a dashboard to see your notifications. Signing in only requires adding rel-me links from your site to at least one service (Twitter and GitHub are common) that links back and can do the oAuth dance on your behalf.

      I've know this was possible for sites that didn't have plugins or custom code yet, but hadn't done it until I added it to my own MediaWiki site last night.

      If I recall, there's also a way to use some scripting to export the data from webmention.io to display it on your own website, but I haven't gotten that far yet.

      I suspect this is what @sphygmus is doing, though she can confirm.

    1. However, when groups of readers come together and collectively read and write annotation in response to a shared text, then annotation can - under curated circumstances - spark and sustain conversation.

      I can't help but note that within the IndieWeb community, they're using a combination of online chat and wiki tools which to a great extent are a larger ongoing conversation. The conversation continues on a daily (almost hourly) basis and the substantive portions of that conversation are captured within the wiki for future reference. Interestingly, an internal chat bot, known as Loqi, allows one to actively make changes to the wiki from within the chat. In some sense, within this community there could be an analogy to which came first the chicken or the egg, but replacing those with conversation and annotation.

    1. Personal websites can be so much more than a progression of posts over time, newer posts showing up while everything from the past is neatly tucked on “page 2” and beyond.

      This is an interesting idea and too many CMSes are missing this sort of UI baked into them as a core idea. CMSes could do a better job of doing both: the garden AND the stream

    2. While I lament the loss of some of the artistry of the early web and lay much of the blame at the feet of blogging platforms like WordPress, such platforms also opened the web to far more people who would not have otherwise been able to create a website. Democratizing publishing is a far loftier goal than dropping animated GIFs across personal spaces.

      WordPress has done a lot to democratize publishing and make portions of it easier, but has it gone too far in crystalizing the form of things by not having more wiki-like or curation-based features?

    1. There’s also the fact that wikis are used to store information that can be edited at a later time by a third party, which is something that blogs cannot do.

      Perhaps this is a part of where the definition changes for me to blur the difference between the two modalities (wikis vs. blogs). If a wiki is held as public, yet still personal and any changes to it are done by a fork and edit by a third party with a webmention back to the original, then the barrier can be removed. If one can use a webmention notification from the branch back to the original so that the new knowledge can either be aggregated or not at the first party's discretion. This allows the ideas and potentially growing voice of atomicules of information to grow and spread.

      This gives a bit of the best of the both worlds. There can be multiple minds and models working, but the information can still be shared and aggregated over time. This may also expand creativity as there isn't necessarily one canonical source, but many.

      Thus a personal wiki and blog combination can use small atoms of information in a wiki-like style to slowly build up a set of facts where a longer blog-like article then becomes a crystallization of a specific voice's synthesis and analysis of those underlying facts.

      If the wiki chunks are copyable and sharable then different people may synthesize different ideas. Additionally by reshuffling the various pieces, the author of a particular blog article may rewrite or revise their original thinking with additional smaller wiki-like pieces to come to an alternate or expanded conclusion.

      Thinking of a wiki as something that has to be voiceless and communal may be the biggest wall between the two modalities. If there were a larger community of personal wikis that were interlinked then these barriers might be broken down.

      Additionally, this is more like what the OER community may be looking for. There are very concrete topics like calculus, as an example, but there can certainly be dozens of approaches to the topic in as many or more voices to suit the needs of particular learners. In fact there are many calculus textbooks geared toward different audiences: biologists, physicists, economists, mathematicians, social sciences, etc. The underlying ideas may all be incredibly similar but could be remixed in different and creative ways.

    2. to what extent is there value in breaking down the wall between blogging and wiki, and to what extent are these two technologies best left to do what they do best?
    3. What wiki brought to these models, which were personal to start with, was collaboration. Wiki values are often polar opposites of blogging values. Personal voice is meant to be minimized. Voices are meant to be merged. Rather than serial presentation, wiki values treating pages as nodes that stand outside of any particular narrative, and attempt to be timeless rather than timebound reactions. Wiki iterates not through the creation of new posts, but through the refactoring of old posts. It shows not a mind in motion, but the clearest and fairest description of what that mind has (or more usually, what those minds have) arrived at. It values reuse over reply, and links are not pointers to related conversations but to related ideas.
    4. These are just two of many things that come up, and I don’t really have a great answer to these questions. In most cases I’d say it makes sense for these to remain two conceptually distinct projects, except for the big looming issue which is with the open web shrinking it might helpful for these communities to join common cause and solve some of the problems that have plagued both blogging and wiki in their attempt to compete with proprietary platforms.
    5. Wiki is perhaps the only web idiom that is not a child of BBS culture. It derives historically from pre-web models of hypertext, with an emphasis on the pre. The immediate ancestor of wiki was a Hypercard stack maintained by Ward Cunningham that attempted to capture community knowledge among programmers. Its philosophical godfather was the dead-tree hypertext A Pattern Language written by Christopher Alexander in the 1970s.
    6. Should Wikity follow the wiki tradition of supplying editable source to collaborators? Or the web syndication model of supplying encoded content. (Here, actually, I come down rather firmly on the source side of the equation — encoded content is a model suited for readers, not co-authors).

      What does he mean by "encoded" content? and why is it a problem?

    1. I have one system for the stream, and one for the garden. It's a bit 'manual til it hurts' at the moment combining the two - but not a big deal. If I had a choice, I'd go for moving the stream to org-mode too. But WordPress is so full featured for now with IndieWeb stuff, it'd take a long time to recreate all that in org-mode (there is Arcology though if only could get the source…)

      I too would give my left arm to have a fully featured IndieWeb capable wiki. TiddlyWiki is pretty close to the sort of tool I'd love, but it's missing some of the IndieWeb capabilities and it may be difficult to build them into the system.

    2. I have been wikifying past stream posts on things duplication of effort how would I avoid that duplication of effort going forwards? so that things from the stream end up in the wiki with minimal effort possibly using the org-roam timeline feature as the place to do stream posts would work for that one day… I'd want the stream to be all be indiewebified

      How could the two be merged to remove all the duplication pieces? Could there be a note/status update/Twitter-like stream for the small tidbits, then a place where further aggregation continues, and finally a finalized article that crystallizes and analyzes the thing that gets output as part of an article stream?

      Then everything is in one place and much more easily searched and referenced. I find that having things in as few places as possible is very helpful and prevents the "where did I put that idea?" problem.

    3. maybe once a week do a weekly review and put stuff back into the wiki, either new notes, or refinements of existing ones

      This regularly scheduled review and revision portion can be very important. Too often people throw things into their "stream" and then never revisit them. The reflection and review over them may help one gain greater perspective or allow them to re-think something to discover bits they may not have seen or realized before, particularly after intervening time has provided additional ideas and experience.

    1. 2011-06-23 at OSBridge2011 having lunch with Ward, Tantek exclaimed: The Read Write Web is no longer sufficient. I want the Read Fork Write Merge Web. #osb11 lunch table. #diso #indieweb

      This is what I want too!

    1. I’m shocked and amazed that we still struggle to find materials.

      Something about this sentence and its lead up reminds of this particularly great section of the Microformats wiki about why not email: http://microformats.org/wiki/wiki-better-than-email

    2. It really is the ultimate garden.

      I've long wanted to create my own personal wiki, and while reading this thus far have continued to think about it. Perhaps I need to just jump in and build one to supplement my stream-based commonplace book? I'll need to think about how to best dovetail the two together.

    3. these abilities – to link, annotate, change, summarize, copy, and share — these are the verbs of gardening.
    4. But imagine a world where you write an article named Subsidies and Local Government in WordPress, and that pings a notifier that indexes that page. And immediately you are notified of all pages named this, and presented with a list of pages those pages link to.

      A great argument to add webmentions to wiki software!

    1. Some other interesting wikis Credit for inspiration for this whole project comes from a variety of wikis and wiki-like collections on the web: buster.wiki/ - Strong design and everything has a date by the looks of it which enables an RSS feed. Very polished and thought through. are.na - A platform that all the cool kids use for building personal knowledge libraries. Lightly social, perhaps the right answer but slightly questionable if they’ll be around for a long time. Ymmv. Brendan’s /canon - this was part of the original inspiration for me. A curated list of pure stock - things that Brendan returns to again and again. He has a template you can copy too. Worrydream’s quotes page - just a massive list of interesting quotes collected by Brett Victor. Notice how being one giant page makes it instantly searchable. daywreckers.com - from Ben Pieratt, not quite a wiki but a very minimal site designed to collect the dots. A daily visit from me. derek sivers’ daily journal - a post from Derek Sivers on how to keep a text-file long-term store for your ideas and notes. And there’s lots more too - this twitter thread has a whole bunch of interesting rabbit holes. And, you can of course find this list of wikis on my wiki :)

      An interesting list here to be sure.

      As I'm thinking about it I also have to think about not only my own blog cum commonplace book, but I do also keep a private digital set of structures in OneNote (primarily) as well as some data Evernote which serve a lot of the same functionality.

    2. Catch up by reading my last post of digital streams, campfires and gardens.

      I immediately thought of a post from Mike Caulfield (Hapgood). Interesting to see that Tom has already read and referenced it in his prior post.

    1. Storyspace has an always-visible Toolbar and Menu to aid students. The Toolbar (Figure 2) provides, top-left to right and down: a Writing Space tool (to create writing areas), the Arrow tool (already familiar to Macintosh users) for routine selecting and clicking, the Note tool (the star) for attaching notes to text, and the Navigation tool (double-headed arrow) for creating and following text links. The Magnify tool (three windows) decreases or enlarges the size of windows. The Linking tool (boxes connected by line) enables linking of one text to other text areas. The Tunnel tool (box within a box) permits linking over widely separated writing spaces. The Compass (four directional arrows) is used to move quickly through levels of the chart, outline, or windows.

      The design of this, which predates that of the wiki, also seems eerily familiar as a digital version of a zettelkasten or the design which seems to underlie Roam Research's product.

    2. As I'm reading this page I can't help but think about how it potentially predates and underlies the idea of the wiki which came just a few years after this piece of software.

    1. as far as I can tell, Wikity is the simplest way to run a personal wiki on top of WordPress.
    2. I began to understand that the goals of Wikity — and of any social software meant to promote deeper thought — began with increasing awareness of the ways in which our current closed, commercial  environments our distorting our reality.

      "Deep Thought" seems like a great product name for a wiki-like project!

      Related, but not, it's also reminiscent of "Deep Thoughts by Jack Handy".

    3. The shortest explanation of Wikity I can provide is this: Wikity is social bookmarks, wikified.
    4. It’s a self-hosted bookmark manager for linked ideas and data that has (for me) revolutionized my ability to think through issues and find connections between ideas I would have otherwise missed.
    1. There should be room for more static sites, sites organised by connections and links, not just by dates.

      And these are called wikis, n'cest pas?

    1. How do you manage information flows? If anyone is using a personal wiki-style long term information tool I’d love to hear from you!

      I've got a handful of interesting things bookmarked here: https://boffosocko.com/tag/wikis/ which includes a rabbit hole of a request similar to your own.

    1. This principle requires us to expand our definition of “publication” beyond the usual narrow sense. Few people will ever publish their work in an academic journal or even on a blog. But everything that we write down and share with someone else counts: notes we share with a friend, homework we submit to a professor, emails we write to our colleagues, and presentations we deliver to clients all count as knowledge made public.

      This idea underlies the reason why one might want to have a public online commonplace book or digital garden.

    1. In short to add wiki-style functionality to my blog, the only functionality that is really needed is that 1) I myself have a edit button on static items, 2) the ability to categorise and tag those items, and 3) keep those items outside of the blog posting stream on the front page, and outside of the RSS feed. WordPress pages fit that description, when I’m logged in, and after adding a plugin to allow categories and tags on pages. So a page based section it is, or rather, will be over time.

      I like the idea of this and the overall structure. It reminds me a bit of Wikity which may provide this functionality plus a bit more. I really need to spin up a version and play around with it to see if it will give me what I'm looking for in terms of a blog linked with wiki-like functionality.

    1. It is our belief that Wikimedia projects are a valuable tool for education, and that engagement with those projects is an activity which enriches the student experience as much as it does the open web itself. Educators worldwide are using Wikimedia in the curriculum – teaching students key skills in information literacy, collaboration, writing as public outreach, information synthesis, source evaluation and data science. Engaging with projects like Wikipedia – particularly through becoming a contributor – enables learners to understand, navigate and critically evaluate information as well as develop an appreciation for the role and importance of open education. Once published, material produced by students becomes immediately accessible by a global audience, giving students the satisfaction of knowing that their work can be seen by many more people than just their tutor. As individuals working in the open web in the twenty-first century it is incumbent upon us to embrace innovative learning, embedding into our practice those tools which equip our students to work collaboratively, be skilled digitally, and think critically.

      This would generally apply to almost any wiki product. In part, it's why I maintain a personal wiki on the open web.

    1. What’s the difference between a digital garden, a note-taking app, and a blog? You can see the digital garden sitting between the former and the latter. It’s a place to share your evergreen notes—not raw notes you may have stored in your note-taking app, but not quite the level of polish you would expect on a blog. Creating a digital garden is a great way to receive early feedback on your ideas. Over time, several posts in your digital garden may be combined to create longer essays to post on your blog, but it won’t necessarily be the case.

      Anne-Laure defines a third "thing" known as a digital garden sitting in between a private note-taking/thinking tool and a blog. She calls it here a digital garden.

      The idea is interesting, but requires some additional work to create the third thing, which is okay for those who'd want it.

      In some sense, I'm more likely to create just a single thing that does all three functionalities and not worry too much about the public/private portions. I'm not opposed to maintaining all three, though it will require a tool that has the pre-built UI to make maintaining them all simple. Otherwise, I'm not sure the manual work would work for me.

    1. This crafted irregularity engages our senses by offering the promise of the unexpected without the threat of the wilderness.

      A reason that many wikis have functionality to find and help prevent "orphans". It helps the journey to prevent garden paths from ending.

    1. The complementary principle to dividing isgathering and collecting. Eachnew composition can also be conceived as a place into which culled and rec-ollected matters are gathered. The very concept of reading in Latin is basedonthenotionof‘‘gathering,’’Latinlegere, ‘‘to read’’ having as its root mean-ing ‘‘to collect up, to gather by picking, plucking, and the like.’’ The Greekverblegōhad a similar range of meaning, from ‘‘to lay’’ something down or‘‘to lay asleep’’ to ‘‘to lay [things] in order,’’ hence ‘‘to gather, pick up,’’ ‘‘torelate,’’ ‘‘to speak purposefully.’’ The name of one venerable and essential typeof ancient and medieval encyclopedia puns on these closely allied verbs: theflorilegium, ‘‘flower-culling’’ (with a pun on ‘‘flower-reading’’), a collection ofsayings, maxims, and stories collected from past works, sometimes quotedexactly (though in mnemonically brief segments), but often just summarized.The best known of these through much of the Middle Ages was ValeriusMaximus’sDicta et facta memorabilia(early first century..), but there aremany other examples. Indeed, the premodern encyclopedia itself is a sort ofmemory-book, the flowers of (one’s extensive) reading gathered up in someorderly arrangement for the purpose of quick, secure recollection in connec-tion with making a new composition. After all, this is one essential purposeof encyclopedias even today.

      This seems awfully close to the sort of "digital gardens" I've been reading about recently. They obviously are not a new idea.

      For example see: https://github.com/MaggieAppleton/digital-gardeners

    2. Gardens were also popular, the medieval sort of garden,with orderly beds of medicinal plants and fruit trees separated by grass andsurrounded by a wall. Undoubtedly, gardens became popular with monasticand later writers because of the Song of Songs, a preeminent text for mysticalmeditation. Various other Biblical structures were often used too: the Taber-nacle described in Exodus; the Temple described in  Kings; the Jerusalemcitadel envisioned by Ezekiel and often conflated with the Heavenly City ofthe Apocalypse. We now would never think to organize an encyclopedia ofknowledge on the plan of Noah’s Ark, but for a clerical audience to whomthis text was as familiar as the order of the alphabet is to us—why not? It is asimple (if large), clearly arranged (if imaginary) composition site, containingmany useful compartments with a straightforward route among them, a sortof foundational map to use in arranging your materials (orresin Latin) as yougather them into the location of your new composition from the networksof your experiences, including of course all your experiences of books, music,and other arts. Thus, in the course of an ideal medieval education, in addi-tion to acquiring a great many segments of scriptural and classical texts, onealso would acquire an extensive repertoire of image-schemes in which to putthem, both ‘‘to lay them away’’ and ‘‘to collect them’’ in new arrangementson later occasions.

      Again, another reference to gardens with respect to memorizing information. There's a direct correlation to some of the sorts of thinking tools many are using to create digital gardens or personal wikis. These ideas aren't new! Our predecessors were simply using different structures to store and remember them. Their tools were different, but their goals and general methods were ultimately the same.

    1. The path must not twist so much that visitors think they are being led astray, nor be so slow that visitors give up and strike cross-country through search engines. Nevertheless, twists and detours can help designers give their readers more than they expect.

      This makes me wonder if there are interesting major features or patterns we've not created for the web in general. Upsell, crosssell, alternatives, etc... are all corporate features. What about some interesting new artistic features perhaps?

      Almost no websites I run across are designed like this simple garden example. It's as if the website idea has been so rigidly crystalized that there's no room for exploration anymore.

    1. Aside: I'd also like to explore minimaps in the future to visually represent unreads in a compact way.

      It would be cool if I had a way to look at the creation times and flow of someone's personal wiki and view new branches and leaves in a visual way. The Fraidyc.at reader is the beginning of a way of doing this, but isn't exactly the thing. Perhaps if it had read statuses? And went beyond the 10 or so most recent things using storage? It already does a good job with some temporality pieces.

    1. Some of the ideas here mirror many of those I've been looking at in having an online personal wiki where I do my collecting, annotating, and active thinking.

    1. Blogs tend towards conversational and quotative reuse, which is great for some subject areas, but not so great for others. Wiki feeds forward into a consensus process that provides a high level of remix and reuse, but at the expense of personal control and the preservation of divergent goals.

      And here it is, the key to the universe!

      We need something that is a meld between the wiki and the blog. Something that will let learners aggregate, ponder, and then synthesize into their own voice. A place where they can create their own goals and directions.

    1.  I often find myself saying, “I saved something about that…somewhere…<img class="emoji" role="img" draggable="false" src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/12.0.0-1/svg/1f914.svg" alt="🤔">“ Here’s what that looks like:  <img width="777" height="468" src="http://bjosephburch.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/secondbrain-2.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="Roam Digital Garden Second Brain" srcset="http://bjosephburch.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/secondbrain-2.jpg 777w, http://bjosephburch.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/secondbrain-2-300x181.jpg 300w, http://bjosephburch.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/secondbrain-2-768x463.jpg 768w" sizes="(max-width: 777px) 100vw, 777px">

      I have had this issue with my data spread over multiple sites and services and not easily searchable.

      Unless one can buy into a single system, it may be an eternal problem...

    1. Readers enter through a single portal (top), move through found parallel lanes of introduction and motivation, and then enter the more densely-linked core discussion of parks and gardens. The opening section is a formal garden, the later discussion is parkland.

      Good gardens might have multiple entrances and potential multiple exits to other adjacent gardens.

      What is the difference between a walled garden and a ghetto? The perception of the people inside versus those who are attempting to keep them there?

      Facebook may have been a walled garden of sortsonce , but if the people in charge are coercing the residents to stay inside, is it a walled garden anymore or has it become a ghetto? a concentration camp? At some point the definition only changes based on the perception of the people being held and their ultimate fates.

    1. I decided I wanted something that was a cross between a wiki and a blog - which Ward Cunningham immediately dubbed a bliki.
    1. Is there a particular project you want to pursue?

      Though I joined late, the course has spurred me to think about the concepts of mixing blogchains with webmentions, and resparked my interest in getting wikis to accept webmentions as well for building and cross-linking information.

    1. We can look at a later iteration of Everipedia itself as an example. Right now, there is one centralized encyclopedia: Wikipedia. With the Everipedia Network, there will be a protocol that will enable people from all over the web to participate in a much broader project.

      As I look at this, I can't help think about my desire to want to be able to link to a wiki in a post and have a Webmention added to that post's "See Also" or reference section. With the link automatically added to the wiki's page like this, future readers and editors could have access to my original and could potentially synopsize and include details from my post into the wiki's article.

  32. Sep 2020
  33. Feb 2020
    1. The move toward social constructivist pedagogical models, initiated by researchers such as Piaget and Vygotsky, makes the wiki a potentially useful educational tool. The wiki can provide the medium by which learners communicate and negotiate in their efforts to reach a shared understanding of a problem (Bruns, 2005).

      Social constructivist pedagogical models make the wiki a useful tool. It provides a medium by which learners communicate and negotiate in their efforts to reach a common understanding.

    2. The wiki can be used as a semantic networking tool, a way to construct meaningful connections between topics, ideas or concepts. A semantic network is composed of nodes (such as wiki pages ) with meaningful links (hyperlinks) connecting them. A semantic network of wikis can help learners to organize their ideas and to convey that organisation of ideas to others (Jonassen et al, 1999, p.165)

      semantic networking tool: a way to construct meaningful connections between topics, ideas or concepts. A semantic network is composed of nodes (such as wiki pages) with meaningful links (hyperlinks) connecting them. The pages are nodes the hyperlinks are the meaningful links. You can also see how important a concept is by the times it appears in other pages.s

    3. Formatting text is done with wiki markup (a simplified version of HTML) such as an extra blank line for a new paragraph, _underlined_, ’’emphasized text’’, ’’’strong text’’’, —- horizontal rule, etc. A word with embedded capitals (CamelStyle) saved in an existing wiki page will create a link to a form for creating a new page. Adding pictures, movies or sounds can be achieved by including the URL of the file.

      Wiki markup, markdown, and other simplified versions of HTML are very important for future graduates. I had a friend in college who was asked to edit articles in wikipedia as an assignment and one of the extraneous loads on her cognitive processing power was learning simplified markdown. The use of bolding, italics, images, ordered and unordered lists are crucial for clear messaging and a person that struggles to do that in future careers would have an issue.

    4. Mind tools are computer-based tools and learning environments that have been adapted or developed to function as intellectual partners with the learner in order to engage and facilitate critical thinking and higher order learning. (Jonassen, 2000, p.9)