50 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2020
    1.  I often find myself saying, “I saved something about that…somewhere…<img class="emoji" role="img" draggable="false" src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/12.0.0-1/svg/1f914.svg" alt="🤔">“ Here’s what that looks like:  <img width="777" height="468" src="http://bjosephburch.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/secondbrain-2.jpg" class="attachment-large size-large" alt="Roam Digital Garden Second Brain" srcset="http://bjosephburch.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/secondbrain-2.jpg 777w, http://bjosephburch.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/secondbrain-2-300x181.jpg 300w, http://bjosephburch.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/secondbrain-2-768x463.jpg 768w" sizes="(max-width: 777px) 100vw, 777px">

      I have had this issue with my data spread over multiple sites and services and not easily searchable.

      Unless one can buy into a single system, it may be an eternal problem...

    1. Gardens were also popular, the medieval sort of garden,with orderly beds of medicinal plants and fruit trees separated by grass andsurrounded by a wall. Undoubtedly, gardens became popular with monasticand later writers because of the Song of Songs, a preeminent text for mysticalmeditation. Various other Biblical structures were often used too: the Taber-nacle described in Exodus; the Temple described in  Kings; the Jerusalemcitadel envisioned by Ezekiel and often conflated with the Heavenly City ofthe Apocalypse. We now would never think to organize an encyclopedia ofknowledge on the plan of Noah’s Ark, but for a clerical audience to whomthis text was as familiar as the order of the alphabet is to us—why not? It is asimple (if large), clearly arranged (if imaginary) composition site, containingmany useful compartments with a straightforward route among them, a sortof foundational map to use in arranging your materials (orresin Latin) as yougather them into the location of your new composition from the networksof your experiences, including of course all your experiences of books, music,and other arts. Thus, in the course of an ideal medieval education, in addi-tion to acquiring a great many segments of scriptural and classical texts, onealso would acquire an extensive repertoire of image-schemes in which to putthem, both ‘‘to lay them away’’ and ‘‘to collect them’’ in new arrangementson later occasions.

      Again, another reference to gardens with respect to memorizing information. There's a direct correlation to some of the sorts of thinking tools many are using to create digital gardens or personal wikis. These ideas aren't new! Our predecessors were simply using different structures to store and remember them. Their tools were different, but their goals and general methods were ultimately the same.

    2. The complementary principle to dividing isgathering and collecting. Eachnew composition can also be conceived as a place into which culled and rec-ollected matters are gathered. The very concept of reading in Latin is basedonthenotionof‘‘gathering,’’Latinlegere, ‘‘to read’’ having as its root mean-ing ‘‘to collect up, to gather by picking, plucking, and the like.’’ The Greekverblegōhad a similar range of meaning, from ‘‘to lay’’ something down or‘‘to lay asleep’’ to ‘‘to lay [things] in order,’’ hence ‘‘to gather, pick up,’’ ‘‘torelate,’’ ‘‘to speak purposefully.’’ The name of one venerable and essential typeof ancient and medieval encyclopedia puns on these closely allied verbs: theflorilegium, ‘‘flower-culling’’ (with a pun on ‘‘flower-reading’’), a collection ofsayings, maxims, and stories collected from past works, sometimes quotedexactly (though in mnemonically brief segments), but often just summarized.The best known of these through much of the Middle Ages was ValeriusMaximus’sDicta et facta memorabilia(early first century..), but there aremany other examples. Indeed, the premodern encyclopedia itself is a sort ofmemory-book, the flowers of (one’s extensive) reading gathered up in someorderly arrangement for the purpose of quick, secure recollection in connec-tion with making a new composition. After all, this is one essential purposeof encyclopedias even today.

      This seems awfully close to the sort of "digital gardens" I've been reading about recently. They obviously are not a new idea.

      For example see: https://github.com/MaggieAppleton/digital-gardeners

    1. Blogs tend towards conversational and quotative reuse, which is great for some subject areas, but not so great for others. Wiki feeds forward into a consensus process that provides a high level of remix and reuse, but at the expense of personal control and the preservation of divergent goals.

      And here it is, the key to the universe!

      We need something that is a meld between the wiki and the blog. Something that will let learners aggregate, ponder, and then synthesize into their own voice. A place where they can create their own goals and directions.

    1. Aside: I'd also like to explore minimaps in the future to visually represent unreads in a compact way.

      It would be cool if I had a way to look at the creation times and flow of someone's personal wiki and view new branches and leaves in a visual way. The Fraidyc.at reader is the beginning of a way of doing this, but isn't exactly the thing. Perhaps if it had read statuses? And went beyond the 10 or so most recent things using storage? It already does a good job with some temporality pieces.

    1. Some of the ideas here mirror many of those I've been looking at in having an online personal wiki where I do my collecting, annotating, and active thinking.

    1. What’s the difference between a digital garden, a note-taking app, and a blog? You can see the digital garden sitting between the former and the latter. It’s a place to share your evergreen notes—not raw notes you may have stored in your note-taking app, but not quite the level of polish you would expect on a blog. Creating a digital garden is a great way to receive early feedback on your ideas. Over time, several posts in your digital garden may be combined to create longer essays to post on your blog, but it won’t necessarily be the case.

      Anne-Laure defines a third "thing" known as a digital garden sitting in between a private note-taking/thinking tool and a blog. She calls it here a digital garden.

      The idea is interesting, but requires some additional work to create the third thing, which is okay for those who'd want it.

      In some sense, I'm more likely to create just a single thing that does all three functionalities and not worry too much about the public/private portions. I'm not opposed to maintaining all three, though it will require a tool that has the pre-built UI to make maintaining them all simple. Otherwise, I'm not sure the manual work would work for me.

    1. I decided I wanted something that was a cross between a wiki and a blog - which Ward Cunningham immediately dubbed a bliki.
    1. I have one system for the stream, and one for the garden. It's a bit 'manual til it hurts' at the moment combining the two - but not a big deal. If I had a choice, I'd go for moving the stream to org-mode too. But WordPress is so full featured for now with IndieWeb stuff, it'd take a long time to recreate all that in org-mode (there is Arcology though if only could get the source…)

      I too would give my left arm to have a fully featured IndieWeb capable wiki. TiddlyWiki is pretty close to the sort of tool I'd love, but it's missing some of the IndieWeb capabilities and it may be difficult to build them into the system.

    2. I have been wikifying past stream posts on things duplication of effort how would I avoid that duplication of effort going forwards? so that things from the stream end up in the wiki with minimal effort possibly using the org-roam timeline feature as the place to do stream posts would work for that one day… I'd want the stream to be all be indiewebified

      How could the two be merged to remove all the duplication pieces? Could there be a note/status update/Twitter-like stream for the small tidbits, then a place where further aggregation continues, and finally a finalized article that crystallizes and analyzes the thing that gets output as part of an article stream?

      Then everything is in one place and much more easily searched and referenced. I find that having things in as few places as possible is very helpful and prevents the "where did I put that idea?" problem.

    3. maybe once a week do a weekly review and put stuff back into the wiki, either new notes, or refinements of existing ones

      This regularly scheduled review and revision portion can be very important. Too often people throw things into their "stream" and then never revisit them. The reflection and review over them may help one gain greater perspective or allow them to re-think something to discover bits they may not have seen or realized before, particularly after intervening time has provided additional ideas and experience.

    1. In short to add wiki-style functionality to my blog, the only functionality that is really needed is that 1) I myself have a edit button on static items, 2) the ability to categorise and tag those items, and 3) keep those items outside of the blog posting stream on the front page, and outside of the RSS feed. WordPress pages fit that description, when I’m logged in, and after adding a plugin to allow categories and tags on pages. So a page based section it is, or rather, will be over time.

      I like the idea of this and the overall structure. It reminds me a bit of Wikity which may provide this functionality plus a bit more. I really need to spin up a version and play around with it to see if it will give me what I'm looking for in terms of a blog linked with wiki-like functionality.

    1. It is our belief that Wikimedia projects are a valuable tool for education, and that engagement with those projects is an activity which enriches the student experience as much as it does the open web itself. Educators worldwide are using Wikimedia in the curriculum – teaching students key skills in information literacy, collaboration, writing as public outreach, information synthesis, source evaluation and data science. Engaging with projects like Wikipedia – particularly through becoming a contributor – enables learners to understand, navigate and critically evaluate information as well as develop an appreciation for the role and importance of open education. Once published, material produced by students becomes immediately accessible by a global audience, giving students the satisfaction of knowing that their work can be seen by many more people than just their tutor. As individuals working in the open web in the twenty-first century it is incumbent upon us to embrace innovative learning, embedding into our practice those tools which equip our students to work collaboratively, be skilled digitally, and think critically.

      This would generally apply to almost any wiki product. In part, it's why I maintain a personal wiki on the open web.

  2. Apr 2020
    1. I began to understand that the goals of Wikity — and of any social software meant to promote deeper thought — began with increasing awareness of the ways in which our current closed, commercial  environments our distorting our reality.

      "Deep Thought" seems like a great product name for a wiki-like project!

      Related, but not, it's also reminiscent of "Deep Thoughts by Jack Handy".

    2. as far as I can tell, Wikity is the simplest way to run a personal wiki on top of WordPress.
    3. It’s a self-hosted bookmark manager for linked ideas and data that has (for me) revolutionized my ability to think through issues and find connections between ideas I would have otherwise missed.
    4. The shortest explanation of Wikity I can provide is this: Wikity is social bookmarks, wikified.
    1. There’s also the fact that wikis are used to store information that can be edited at a later time by a third party, which is something that blogs cannot do.

      Perhaps this is a part of where the definition changes for me to blur the difference between the two modalities (wikis vs. blogs). If a wiki is held as public, yet still personal and any changes to it are done by a fork and edit by a third party with a webmention back to the original, then the barrier can be removed. If one can use a webmention notification from the branch back to the original so that the new knowledge can either be aggregated or not at the first party's discretion. This allows the ideas and potentially growing voice of atomicules of information to grow and spread.

      This gives a bit of the best of the both worlds. There can be multiple minds and models working, but the information can still be shared and aggregated over time. This may also expand creativity as there isn't necessarily one canonical source, but many.

      Thus a personal wiki and blog combination can use small atoms of information in a wiki-like style to slowly build up a set of facts where a longer blog-like article then becomes a crystallization of a specific voice's synthesis and analysis of those underlying facts.

      If the wiki chunks are copyable and sharable then different people may synthesize different ideas. Additionally by reshuffling the various pieces, the author of a particular blog article may rewrite or revise their original thinking with additional smaller wiki-like pieces to come to an alternate or expanded conclusion.

      Thinking of a wiki as something that has to be voiceless and communal may be the biggest wall between the two modalities. If there were a larger community of personal wikis that were interlinked then these barriers might be broken down.

      Additionally, this is more like what the OER community may be looking for. There are very concrete topics like calculus, as an example, but there can certainly be dozens of approaches to the topic in as many or more voices to suit the needs of particular learners. In fact there are many calculus textbooks geared toward different audiences: biologists, physicists, economists, mathematicians, social sciences, etc. The underlying ideas may all be incredibly similar but could be remixed in different and creative ways.

    2. These are just two of many things that come up, and I don’t really have a great answer to these questions. In most cases I’d say it makes sense for these to remain two conceptually distinct projects, except for the big looming issue which is with the open web shrinking it might helpful for these communities to join common cause and solve some of the problems that have plagued both blogging and wiki in their attempt to compete with proprietary platforms.
    3. Should Wikity follow the wiki tradition of supplying editable source to collaborators? Or the web syndication model of supplying encoded content. (Here, actually, I come down rather firmly on the source side of the equation — encoded content is a model suited for readers, not co-authors).

      What does he mean by "encoded" content? and why is it a problem?

    4. to what extent is there value in breaking down the wall between blogging and wiki, and to what extent are these two technologies best left to do what they do best?
    5. What wiki brought to these models, which were personal to start with, was collaboration. Wiki values are often polar opposites of blogging values. Personal voice is meant to be minimized. Voices are meant to be merged. Rather than serial presentation, wiki values treating pages as nodes that stand outside of any particular narrative, and attempt to be timeless rather than timebound reactions. Wiki iterates not through the creation of new posts, but through the refactoring of old posts. It shows not a mind in motion, but the clearest and fairest description of what that mind has (or more usually, what those minds have) arrived at. It values reuse over reply, and links are not pointers to related conversations but to related ideas.
    6. Wiki is perhaps the only web idiom that is not a child of BBS culture. It derives historically from pre-web models of hypertext, with an emphasis on the pre. The immediate ancestor of wiki was a Hypercard stack maintained by Ward Cunningham that attempted to capture community knowledge among programmers. Its philosophical godfather was the dead-tree hypertext A Pattern Language written by Christopher Alexander in the 1970s.
    1. Storyspace has an always-visible Toolbar and Menu to aid students. The Toolbar (Figure 2) provides, top-left to right and down: a Writing Space tool (to create writing areas), the Arrow tool (already familiar to Macintosh users) for routine selecting and clicking, the Note tool (the star) for attaching notes to text, and the Navigation tool (double-headed arrow) for creating and following text links. The Magnify tool (three windows) decreases or enlarges the size of windows. The Linking tool (boxes connected by line) enables linking of one text to other text areas. The Tunnel tool (box within a box) permits linking over widely separated writing spaces. The Compass (four directional arrows) is used to move quickly through levels of the chart, outline, or windows.

      The design of this, which predates that of the wiki, also seems eerily familiar as a digital version of a zettelkasten or the design which seems to underlie Roam Research's product.

    2. As I'm reading this page I can't help but think about how it potentially predates and underlies the idea of the wiki which came just a few years after this piece of software.

    1. The path must not twist so much that visitors think they are being led astray, nor be so slow that visitors give up and strike cross-country through search engines. Nevertheless, twists and detours can help designers give their readers more than they expect.

      This makes me wonder if there are interesting major features or patterns we've not created for the web in general. Upsell, crosssell, alternatives, etc... are all corporate features. What about some interesting new artistic features perhaps?

      Almost no websites I run across are designed like this simple garden example. It's as if the website idea has been so rigidly crystalized that there's no room for exploration anymore.

    1. This crafted irregularity engages our senses by offering the promise of the unexpected without the threat of the wilderness.

      A reason that many wikis have functionality to find and help prevent "orphans". It helps the journey to prevent garden paths from ending.

    1. Readers enter through a single portal (top), move through found parallel lanes of introduction and motivation, and then enter the more densely-linked core discussion of parks and gardens. The opening section is a formal garden, the later discussion is parkland.

      Good gardens might have multiple entrances and potential multiple exits to other adjacent gardens.

      What is the difference between a walled garden and a ghetto? The perception of the people inside versus those who are attempting to keep them there?

      Facebook may have been a walled garden of sortsonce , but if the people in charge are coercing the residents to stay inside, is it a walled garden anymore or has it become a ghetto? a concentration camp? At some point the definition only changes based on the perception of the people being held and their ultimate fates.

  3. Mar 2020
    1. (This is a much better question for @sphygmus, who seems to have a dope Webmention setup for her TiddlyWiki.)

      Webmention in general is certainly dope.

      In looking at her set up, it looks like she's used her site to sign into Aaron Parecki's https://webmention.io/ service which gives the site two link elements to put into the <header> of the site. Webmention.io then does all the plumbing for the site and allows you to log into a dashboard to see your notifications. Signing in only requires adding rel-me links from your site to at least one service (Twitter and GitHub are common) that links back and can do the oAuth dance on your behalf.

      I've know this was possible for sites that didn't have plugins or custom code yet, but hadn't done it until I added it to my own MediaWiki site last night.

      If I recall, there's also a way to use some scripting to export the data from webmention.io to display it on your own website, but I haven't gotten that far yet.

      I suspect this is what @sphygmus is doing, though she can confirm.

  4. Feb 2020
    1. The move toward social constructivist pedagogical models, initiated by researchers such as Piaget and Vygotsky, makes the wiki a potentially useful educational tool. The wiki can provide the medium by which learners communicate and negotiate in their efforts to reach a shared understanding of a problem (Bruns, 2005).

      Social constructivist pedagogical models make the wiki a useful tool. It provides a medium by which learners communicate and negotiate in their efforts to reach a common understanding.

    2. The wiki can be used as a semantic networking tool, a way to construct meaningful connections between topics, ideas or concepts. A semantic network is composed of nodes (such as wiki pages ) with meaningful links (hyperlinks) connecting them. A semantic network of wikis can help learners to organize their ideas and to convey that organisation of ideas to others (Jonassen et al, 1999, p.165)

      semantic networking tool: a way to construct meaningful connections between topics, ideas or concepts. A semantic network is composed of nodes (such as wiki pages) with meaningful links (hyperlinks) connecting them. The pages are nodes the hyperlinks are the meaningful links. You can also see how important a concept is by the times it appears in other pages.s

    3. Formatting text is done with wiki markup (a simplified version of HTML) such as an extra blank line for a new paragraph, _underlined_, ’’emphasized text’’, ’’’strong text’’’, —- horizontal rule, etc. A word with embedded capitals (CamelStyle) saved in an existing wiki page will create a link to a form for creating a new page. Adding pictures, movies or sounds can be achieved by including the URL of the file.

      Wiki markup, markdown, and other simplified versions of HTML are very important for future graduates. I had a friend in college who was asked to edit articles in wikipedia as an assignment and one of the extraneous loads on her cognitive processing power was learning simplified markdown. The use of bolding, italics, images, ordered and unordered lists are crucial for clear messaging and a person that struggles to do that in future careers would have an issue.

    4. Mind tools are computer-based tools and learning environments that have been adapted or developed to function as intellectual partners with the learner in order to engage and facilitate critical thinking and higher order learning. (Jonassen, 2000, p.9)
    1. ikis are collaboratively authored, searchable docu ments linked internally and externally. For class room purposes, wikis are designed to be created by more than one student

      Wikis are designed with the intended purpose of being handled by more than 1 student.

    2. ikipedia, the online encyclopedia (www .wikipedia.org), is the most famous example of a wiki. But today, teachers and students are beginning to engage with this technology more and more, creat ing a variety of wiki types (see Table 1).

      Wikipedia is the most famous example, use that one. The way this technology and example shapes our understanding of wikis. We need to be aware of that.

    1. there is anothercollaborative environment which is more naturally suited for collaborative on-line projects,WikiWikliWeb (wiki wiki is Hawaiian for "quick") or wikis. Like blogs, wikis have been around for sometime and are popular among technology buffs.

      Wiki means quick

  5. Dec 2019
    1. There should be room for more static sites, sites organised by connections and links, not just by dates.

      And these are called wikis, n'cest pas?

  6. Nov 2019
    1. Is there a particular project you want to pursue?

      Though I joined late, the course has spurred me to think about the concepts of mixing blogchains with webmentions, and resparked my interest in getting wikis to accept webmentions as well for building and cross-linking information.

  7. Aug 2019
    1. However, when groups of readers come together and collectively read and write annotation in response to a shared text, then annotation can - under curated circumstances - spark and sustain conversation.

      I can't help but note that within the IndieWeb community, they're using a combination of online chat and wiki tools which to a great extent are a larger ongoing conversation. The conversation continues on a daily (almost hourly) basis and the substantive portions of that conversation are captured within the wiki for future reference. Interestingly, an internal chat bot, known as Loqi, allows one to actively make changes to the wiki from within the chat. In some sense, within this community there could be an analogy to which came first the chicken or the egg, but replacing those with conversation and annotation.

  8. Feb 2019
    1. We can look at a later iteration of Everipedia itself as an example. Right now, there is one centralized encyclopedia: Wikipedia. With the Everipedia Network, there will be a protocol that will enable people from all over the web to participate in a much broader project.

      As I look at this, I can't help think about my desire to want to be able to link to a wiki in a post and have a Webmention added to that post's "See Also" or reference section. With the link automatically added to the wiki's page like this, future readers and editors could have access to my original and could potentially synopsize and include details from my post into the wiki's article.

    1. Some other interesting wikis Credit for inspiration for this whole project comes from a variety of wikis and wiki-like collections on the web: buster.wiki/ - Strong design and everything has a date by the looks of it which enables an RSS feed. Very polished and thought through. are.na - A platform that all the cool kids use for building personal knowledge libraries. Lightly social, perhaps the right answer but slightly questionable if they’ll be around for a long time. Ymmv. Brendan’s /canon - this was part of the original inspiration for me. A curated list of pure stock - things that Brendan returns to again and again. He has a template you can copy too. Worrydream’s quotes page - just a massive list of interesting quotes collected by Brett Victor. Notice how being one giant page makes it instantly searchable. daywreckers.com - from Ben Pieratt, not quite a wiki but a very minimal site designed to collect the dots. A daily visit from me. derek sivers’ daily journal - a post from Derek Sivers on how to keep a text-file long-term store for your ideas and notes. And there’s lots more too - this twitter thread has a whole bunch of interesting rabbit holes. And, you can of course find this list of wikis on my wiki :)

      An interesting list here to be sure.

      As I'm thinking about it I also have to think about not only my own blog cum commonplace book, but I do also keep a private digital set of structures in OneNote (primarily) as well as some data Evernote which serve a lot of the same functionality.

    2. Catch up by reading my last post of digital streams, campfires and gardens.

      I immediately thought of a post from Mike Caulfield (Hapgood). Interesting to see that Tom has already read and referenced it in his prior post.

    1. How do you manage information flows? If anyone is using a personal wiki-style long term information tool I’d love to hear from you!

      I've got a handful of interesting things bookmarked here: https://boffosocko.com/tag/wikis/ which includes a rabbit hole of a request similar to your own.

  9. Nov 2018
  10. Sep 2018
    1. But imagine a world where you write an article named Subsidies and Local Government in WordPress, and that pings a notifier that indexes that page. And immediately you are notified of all pages named this, and presented with a list of pages those pages link to.

      A great argument to add webmentions to wiki software!

    2. I’m shocked and amazed that we still struggle to find materials.

      Something about this sentence and its lead up reminds of this particularly great section of the Microformats wiki about why not email: http://microformats.org/wiki/wiki-better-than-email

    3. It really is the ultimate garden.

      I've long wanted to create my own personal wiki, and while reading this thus far have continued to think about it. Perhaps I need to just jump in and build one to supplement my stream-based commonplace book? I'll need to think about how to best dovetail the two together.

    4. these abilities – to link, annotate, change, summarize, copy, and share — these are the verbs of gardening.
  11. Jul 2018