1,402 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. They cannot simply put this article online on their blog: to be recognised as research work, it must be published in a respectable peer-reviewed journal.

      Why not? Why couldn't they put their articles on their own sites or even those of the libraries of their institutions where others might read and evaluate them? annotate them? argue over all the fine points?

    1. Tim Colbourn. (2021, February 22). It’s good that opening up will be done in stages, though more could be done to ensure we don’t fail after the 1st stage and end up back in lockdown due to hospitals filling up again with unvaccinated people. I hope the government don’t end up regretting not doing the above. END [Tweet]. @timcolbourn. https://twitter.com/timcolbourn/status/1363989485516693508

  2. Feb 2021
    1. Paywall: The Business of Scholarship is a documentary which focuses on the need for open access to research and science, questions the rationale behind the $25.2 billion a year that flows into for-profit academic publishers, examines the 35-40% profit margin associated with the top academic publisher Elsevier and looks at how that profit margin is often greater than some of the most profitable tech companies like Apple, Facebook and Google.

      Staying true to the open access model: it is free to stream and download, for private or public use, and maintains the most open CC BY 4.0 Creative Commons designation to ensure anyone regardless of their social, financial or political background will have access.

    1. Identity is always about groups, and group formation is always about identity formation, and both are processes of learning.
    2. I take my own definition of the word “community” from educational theorists Etienne and Beverly Wenger: “communities of practice are groups of people who share a concern or a passion for something they do, and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly.” I like this definition because it is so broad while capturing a really specific truth about groups.
    1. I’ve found Pear Deck to be fine, if somewhat clunky. There are other interactive presentation tools, most notably Nearpod, which I actually prefer to use for interactive presentations. But Pear Deck, unlike Nearpod, allows me to monitor student progress from a dashboard and allows students to click links directly from slides. So Pear Deck it is.

      My 9 year old has been using Nearpod regularly, but I haven't looked at it yet. Pear Deck's additional functionality sounds helpful though.

    2. they work through detailed tutorials to learn a tool or skill. The difference, though, is that I’ve converted the blog post-style tutorials to Pear Deck slides. [3]I’ve found Pear Deck to be fine, if somewhat clunky. There are other interactive presentation tools, most notably Nearpod, which I actually prefer to use for interactive presentations. But Pear … Continue reading jQuery('#footnote_plugin_tooltip_2241_1_3').tooltip({ tip: '#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_2241_1_3', tipClass: 'footnote_tooltip', effect: 'fade', predelay: 0, fadeInSpeed: 200, delay: 400, fadeOutSpeed: 200, position: 'top center', relative: true, offset: [-7, 0], }); Pear Deck is an interactive presentation tool designed for K-12, with a lot of interactive features
  3. Jan 2021
    1. First, power readers exert disproportionate influence on society -- think Warren Buffett, Elon Musk, Oprah, and so on.  Second, education is shifting from something you do until you’re 21 years old to something you do your entire life and books, of course, are the foundation of self-learning -- the real market to think about is education.  Finally, the world's richest man (as of last Friday) started out selling books."

      the power of power readers

    1. From 1909, Albert attended the Royal Naval College, Osborne, as a naval cadet. In 1911 he came bottom of the class in the final examination, but despite this he progressed to the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth.[
    1. I remember reading Matt Bruenig when I was in college, and he was like, “Well, actually Social Security was the most effective pathway to bring people out of poverty.”  I wrote a story in 2017 called “Why Education Is Not the Key to a Good Income,” and it was looking at this growing body of research that showed it was not your level of education that determined your chances of rising economic mobility. It was these other factors—like what kind of industries were in your community, union density, some of it was marriage. 

      makes sense... the best way out of poverty isn't education... it's money.

    1. ensure the relevance, accuracy and effective communication of its interpretation and education programs (see above for A.O.D.A. requirements) by: establishing clearly defined and measurable learning objectives and outcomes, and undertaking a process of program evaluation using appropriate expertise – including staff, volunteers, community groups, or consultants carrying out research ensure all staff involved in the development and delivery of interpretation and education programs, have the appropriate skills and training

      (2) Volunteer opportunities (programming).

  4. Dec 2020
    1. Remember, children are our future, and the majority of them are B students. If that doesn't scare you, it probably should.

      This a note to parents.

    2. I understand why the top students in America study physics, chemistry, calculus and classic literature. The kids in this brainy group are the future professors, scientists, thinkers and engineers who will propel civilization forward. But why do we make B students sit through these same classes?

      Apple revolutionized music buying and consumption. Education is primed for a shakeup.

    1. It’s no coincidence that we walk when we need to think: evidence shows that movement enhances thinking and learning, and both are activated in the same centre of motor control in the brain. In the influential subfield of cognitive science concerned with ‘embodied’ cognition, one prominent claim is that actions themselves are constitutive of cognitive processes. That is, activities such as playing a musical instrument, writing, speaking or dancing don’t start in the brain and then emanate out to the body as actions; rather, they entail the mind and body working in concert as a creative, integrated whole, unfolding and influencing each other in turn. It’s therefore a significant problem that many of us are trapped in work and study environments that don’t allow us to activate these intuitive cognitive muscles, and indeed often even encourage us to avoid them.

      I'm curious if Lynne Kelly or others have looked into these areas of research with their Memory work? She's definitely posited that singing and dancing as well as creating art helps indigenous cultures in their memory work.

    1. Or maybe a better standard was in the humanitarian world. “There’s a core ethical principle called the responsibility to protect, which is about organizations having a primary responsibility to protect their own personnel,” said Abramowitz. “What’s very clear is that many teachers are distrustful because they have been in deeply unsafe situations for a very long time.” Teachers are asked to deal with school shootings, violent children, aggressive adults, poverty, online bullying—a host of complex social problems that aren’t part of their job description, she said. “Educators are so abandoned, they no longer trust in their own system to protect them.
    1. The wise possum had never read Alexis de Tocqueville’s master work Democracy in America (1835). But whoever wants to understand what is afflicting Western postmodernity—with the U.S. going first and Europe following—should read the two chapters on the tyranny imposed not by an oppressive regime, but by a free society. 200 years ago, the young Frenchman praised America’s “extreme liberties” only to warn of a deadly downside: Nowhere else, he wrote, was there “less independence of mind and true freedom of discussion than in America.”

      The hegemony of the minority. A danger of public schooling that we never saw coming. This hegemony came about by sacrificing the potential of black america. The school system the greatest source of systemic racism..

    1. But by default, reports also let managers drill down into data on individual employees, to find those who participate less in group chat conversations, send fewer emails, or fail to collaborate in shared documents.

      This is going to be awesome when it debuts in universities. I can't imagine that any academics will be concerned when a departmental chair or administrator asks you why you're not sending more emails.

  5. Nov 2020
    1. Nous avons été prof de français. Sommés de nous offusquer des fautes d'orthographe, nous avons été pris pour les curés de la langue. Nous avons écrit pour dédramatiser, pour réfléchir ensemble et puis aussi parce qu'on a toujours pensé que l'Académie Française avait un vrai potentiel comique. "Les deux belges qui veulent simplifier la langue française" : tout est faux dans cette phrase. Pas "simplifier" mais bien faire preuve d'esprit critique, se demander si tout se vaut dans notre orthographe. Pas deux belges, mais bien deux curieux qui veulent transmettre le travail des linguistes de toute la francophonie, pas même la "langue française", seulement son orthographe. Car l'orthographe, c'est pas la langue, c'est juste le code graphique qui permet de la retranscrire. Passion pour les uns, chemin de croix pour les autres, elle est sacrée pour tous. Et pourtant, il ne s'agit peut-être que d'un énorme malentendu. Arnaud Hoedt et Jérôme Piron sont linguistes de formation. Ils ont vécu 25 ans sans se connaître, mais c’était moins bien. Ils ont ensuite enseigné pendant 15 ans dans la même école. Quand Arnaud participe à la rédaction des programmes de français en Belgique, Jérôme se spécialise en médiation culturelle. En 2016, ils écrivent et mettent en scène le spectacle « La Convivialité », au Théâtre National de Bruxelles. Ce spectacle conférence qui traite de la question du rapport dogmatique à l’orthographe tourne depuis 3 ans dans toute la francophonie. Dans la foulée, ils publient l’ouvrage « La faute de l’orthographe », aux éditions Textuel. Ils se définissent comme suit : « Linguistes dilet(t)antes. Pédagogues en (robe de) chambre. Tentent de corriger le participe passé. Écrivent des trucs. Vrais-Faux Comédiens. Bouffeurs d’Académicien ». A la question « est-ce que ça se dit ? « , Arnaud et Jérôme répondent invariablement « oui, tu viens de le faire ». This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

    1. L’éducation, de l’école à l’université, constitue également un domaine où se concentrent de fortes discriminations et inégalités liées à l’origine, qui trouvent, notamment, leur source dans le fonctionnement des institutions.
    2. L’éducation, de l’école à l’université, constitue un autre lieu névralgique où se concentrent de forts ressentis de discriminations et d’inégalités liées à l’origine
  6. Oct 2020
    1. BTech in design engineering or BTech engineering design: Design thinking is a popular concept that spans multiple industries and there are courses, independent of any branch purely focussing on designing products. This is also often referred to as an engineering design course or design engineering course. The idea is to teach how to not just bring in design to develop great products that are aesthetically perfect and ergonomically usable and consumer-focused but also to introduce design as a tool for innovative thinking. The curriculum develops design thinking concepts in a manner basis which students can conceptualise and develop products that are innovative while also boasting of high aesthetic value. These graduates are sought after by all manufacturing industries.

      Design thinking fosters innovative thinking.

      It involes designing user focused, highly utilitarian and aesthetic products.

    1. Junior school is great because you don’t learn to find a job. You’re at school to grow as a citizen, not to prepare to your future life, and actually you’re better not to think about your future if you don’t want to question yourself about the meaning of your existence. This is the same thing for side projects. See them as a way to discover a new topic and enlarge your horizon, not as something that you could action in your current position or to find a new job.

      Comparing school to side projects

    1. We do not publish small-scale evaluations of specific software/systems in specialist domains or particular courses in individual institutions (unless the findings have broader relevance that is explicitly drawn out in the paper).

      To be considered

    1. In order for a paper to fall within the scope of ACM TOCE, it must clearly address some aspect of  the teaching and learning of computing. Simply using computing students to study a general educational phenomenon is generally not enough. 

      To take into account

    1. The flipped meeting — pioneered by innovative companies like Amazon and LinkedIn, and built on the model of the flipped classroom that has been rolled out in universities across the country and around the world.  Flipping your meetings can help you win back time wasted in meetings, ensure that every meeting you attend is productive, and empower your teams to collaboratively make smarter, timelier decisions. See how, in our complete guide to flipping your meetings.
    1. By some measures distance education students are somewhat less prepared (e.g. fewer of them attended private high schools) but still have a better chance of graduating college than students who do not take distance education courses. Put simply, at a national level, even potentially less prepared students who participated in distance education early in their college careers were more likely to attain a degree than students who had not done so.

      A followup to studies of community college students in Virginia and Washington, this national study found that students who enrolled in online classes early in their college careers were more likely to complete their degrees. This was true even though students in online classes are somewhat less prepared than those in in person classes. One difference may be that this study was published a few years after the Virginia one, and more students were enrolled in online classes by then. 9/10

    1. But there is an alternative. The “flipped meeting” approach is revolutionary in its simplicity: Share the informational presentation before the meeting so participants are fully informed up front Focus the meeting on making decisions, opening discussion, and getting work done in the meeting, not afterwards This handbook includes a guide to developing a flipped meeting culture in your organization, including: Pre-meeting communication and information sharing needs In-meeting group management and best practices Ideas for using video to make flipped meetings more efficient Flipping your meetings can help you win back time wasted in meetings, ensure that every meeting you attend is productive, and empower your teams to collaboratively make smarter, timelier decisions.

      Flipped meeting solves for the unengaging long lecture.

    1. While scholars have applied the assumptions of andragogy to inform quality online course design, this work proposes that an online course designed using sound pedagogical principles can exhibit a learning experience beneficial to adult learners.

      This short article links Anderson and McCormick's pedagogical principles for online learning with Knowles' andragogical assumptions about adult learning. 8/10

    1. Accordingly, our results strongly suggest thatonlineinstructionin keyintroductorycollege-level courses, at least as currently practiced, maynot be aseffectiveasface-to-faceinstructionat2-yearcommunitycolleges.

      According to a study done across all Virginia Community Colleges, students who signed up for gatekeeper courses (basic English and Math) online did less well in those courses than did their peers who took the same classes in person. There was a higher attrition rate in the online classes as well. Students who came in with good GPAs tended to do well in online courses, but those who were struggling with academics did worse than they probably would have in person. Many statistics are included. 9/10

    1. In order to inform the development and implementation of effective online learning environments, this study was designed to explore both instructors' and students' online learning experiences while enrolled in various online courses. The study investigated what appeared to both support and hinder participants' online teaching and learning experiences.

      The authors discuss the issue of community and engagement in online graduate programs. They carried out a small case study and used a Cognitive Apprenticeship Model to examine a successful program in Higher Education. They found that students feel too many online classes are just reading and writing, regurgitating rather than applying, and lack sufficient connection with the instructor and with other students, They recommend some strategies to fix that, but admit that more work is needed. 9/10

    1. In an interview, he described how these emerging support systems engage students and evaluate their strengths and weaknesses, even when they’re not in the classroom. The systems are not an online course, but rather an online tutor, driven by artificial intelligence, that can assess a student’s strengths and weaknesses and deliver personalized individual instruction.

      An interview with Zachary Pardos, a professor at UC Berkeley who is creating adaptive tutoring software. He describes how he thinks technology and the pandemic will change education over the next several years. He expects greater accessibility to wireless provided like school buses, greater use and development of adaptive tutoring software, and more online learning. I'd need more information on how the system deals with students who don't get it - do they have multiple explanations for math, or just one? 5/10

    1. Higher education institutions need to address these challenges, and technological tools — even some surprisingly simple ones — can go a long way toward enhancing the college experience for older students, says Brian Fleming, executive director of the Sandbox ColLABorative at Southern New Hampshire University.

      Older students (over 25) are often changing careers. They tend to have more responsibilities than traditional college students, and a lower threshold for micro-frustrations like bureaucracy, form. Colleges should accommodate them with things like digital signatures and virtual meeting availability. Technology should be platform-agnostic for them (and everyone). 5/10

    2. Technology Can Help Adult Learners Get the Most Out of Higher Ed

      (Available as transcript or podcast.) This article reviews the definition of the adult learner, identifying their particular learning needs and challenges. Considerations and recommendations for implementing technology are discussed (agnostic software, alleviate micro-frustrations). 5/10

    1. While our program still faces some challenges around engaging our students and keeping them enrolled in programs long enough to complete their goals, technology has allowed us to make some remarkable strides.

      A school system that extends to adult education utilizes online apps as an option (but doesn't require internet access, as many people lack it at home). They have found them to be helpful, especially because people who work odd shift jobs and have burst of time at odd hours can get some practice in. This is most helpful for ESL learners. 6/10

    1. We eventually hope to create affect-sensitive learning environments that respond constructively and effectively to boredom and confusion. When we do, we will have made significant progress towards improving students’ learning experiences, reducing problem behaviors such as gaming the system, managing students’ frustration and confusion in the face of impasses, and ultimately improving students’ learning.

      Researchers studied students cognitive-affective states doing online learning in 3 separate, very different studies, among different student populations, ranging from 12-year-olds to college students. They found that, contrary to prior assumptions, frustration did not necessarily have negative learning outcomes. Boredom tended to last longest of the cognitive-affective states covered, led to the greatest attempts to game the system, and had the least successful learning outcomes. Confusion was sometimes beneficial and sometimes harmful. Therefore, online learning environments should be developed that guard against boredom and perhaps confusion, rather than frustration. 8/10

    1. Therefore, practitioners need to be cognisant of the important role they play in influenc-ing learner motivation when designing learning activities. Most importantly, the relevance and value of the task (e.g., online discussions) need to be clearly identified and linked to learning objectives to help learners understand how the activity can aid in the realisation of personal goals, aspirations, and interests, both in the short and longer term.

      Based on research and two small scale case studies, some students in online learning are intrinsically motivated, but others need to be motivated by the teacher and material. External influences such as deadlines and grades also influenced student motivation. Identified regulation, that is, knowing why the activity is valuable and important, make a very big difference in student motivation. This brings us back to the andragogical idea that the assignments should involve real-world situations and be applicable to students' lives. 9/10

    1. Online learning environments have a promising future for researchers, practitioners, and learners. However designing and developing more effective and efficient online learning environments is possible with ongoing research and development. This paper offers four research goals and matches four existing methodologies to improve student outcomes in online learning environments defined as learner achievement, engagement, and retention.

      The authors outline four general research goals, and then go into detail on some of the questions that should be researched within those areas. They then suggest four methodologies to use in designing students to research those questions: formative, developmental, and experimental research and activity theory. All of these could help include online learning in terms of learner achievement, engagement, and retention. 9/10

    1. Technology integration has also been shown to help create more authentic learning environments where the students are more motivated to attend, have a greater chance of communication and collaboration and have more opportunities to use higher order thinking and problem solving skills connected to real world applications (Fouts, 2000) This has led some to believe that new theories in learning needed to be developed that would help to support the creation of such learning environments. The three emerging theories discussed in this paper all possess the ability to support the creation of such learning environments.  They all support the idea that learning is through action.  They all support that cognition happens through communication and collaboration with others.  They all support the use of technology to help in the creation of such learning environments. It is through these new theories that learning environments, which support the development of these higher-level learning skills, can be created.  

      This appears to be a paper written by an upper-level undergraduate (based on the writing), describing the importance of technology in 21st century education and describing three cognitive theories, all requiring collaborative learning, The author highlights the importance of student engagement through technology, which students like, and assumes its importance in the workplace. 5/10

    1. Research about adults as learners can inform the design of effective digital learning experiences. Although there is no one principle that can be applied to all adults, the design principles outlined here are based on five of the prevailing theories about how adults learn: andragogy, experiential learning, self-directed learning, transformational learning, and neuroscience.

      This article applies the principles of andragogy, self directed learning, experiential learning, transformational learning, and neuroscience (all of which seem rather similar), to low-skilled adults, who are likely to lack confidence about learning and who may be learning in bits of free time via cell phone. Emphasizes the importance of an instructor or coach, along with good use of technology. 8/10

    1. Faculty need to focus on learning theory in the design of instructional technology so that they can create lessons that are not only technology-effective but that are meaningful from the learner’s standpoint.

      Fidishun, a librarian and Penn State's satellite campuses, expands Knowles' 6 assumptions of andragogy, and draws out some of their implications for technology-based instruction for adults. This is short and to the point, but readers would benefit from the writer going into greater details. 7/10

    1. ​Institutions that were primarily online before the pandemic are also doing well. At colleges where more than 90 percent of students took courses solely online pre-pandemic, enrollments are growing for both undergraduate (6.8 percent) and graduate students (7.2 percent).
    1. JVER v29n1 - Analysis of Technology Integration in the Teaching-Learning Process in Selected Career and Technical Education Programs

      This looks at the application of technology in career and technical education programs for adults. It looks at how and how often technology is used in these programs. 8/10, interesting and focused on technical education unlike most articles.

    1. Technology planning: A roadmap to successful technology integration in schools

      This article talks about why, when institutions have prioritized and invested a lot of money in teaching adults to utilize technology in the classroom, there are very little successful instances of integration of technology in classrooms. 5/10, not particularly interesting to me and targeted towards a specific group of adult learners.

    1. DEVELOPMENT ARTICLEA systems-based approach to technology integrationusing mentoring and communities of practice

      This article presents a model of technology integration at the system level formed around mentoring. It focuses on effective methods of teacher professional development in the area of technology integration and discusses overcoming various obstacle teachers face during adult learning/ education. 6/10, very narrow focus of adult learners.

    1. TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATIONTHROUGH PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY

      This article examines the effectiveness of learning communities to support integration of technology into classrooms and effective teacher growth in the area of technology proficiencies. 5/10, learning community findings are useful but this source is very targeted towards a specific group of adult learners.

    1. Technology Andragogy Work Content Knowledge Model as a New Framework in Vocational Education: Revised Technology Pedagogy Content Knowledge Model

      This article focuses on using adult education theory to integrate technology into vocational education. This expands adult learning opportunities to community colleges and trade schools. 8/10 interesting and different from an equity and accessibility standpoint.

    1. Language Research Bulletin,32, ICU, TokyoAndragogy in the 21st century: Applying the Assumptions of Adult Learning Online

      This article emphasizes the importance of creating online programs that have learning objectives that correspond to learners' real-world needs. It examines Knowles' Andragogical Model to provide guidelines for incorporating adult learning principles into course design. 10/10, very good blend of strategy and theory.

    1. A Comprehensive Exploration of Technology's RoleIin Adult Learning

      This article examines and gives bit of information from a book covering the intersection of adult learning and technology innovation. 4/10, while there is information here it is certainly not the entire book and therefore incomplete. It does serve as a quick and accessible alternative for those seeking the books information but lacking the time/ access to read the book.

    1. Pre-service Teachers' Practices towards Digital Game Design for Technology Integration into Science Classrooms

      This article looks at yet another new technology that has the potential to revolutionize the adult learning field. It examines the results of teaching educators about digital game design for technology integration. It looked at integrating this technology into science classrooms in particular. 9/10, very interesting new technology with lots of potential implications in the adult learning field.

    1. Application of augmented reality technologies for education projects preparation

      This article is on the cutting edge of educational technology. It discusses the potential benefits of augmented or enriched reality in education. While this article focuses on studies conducted using teaching practices in a college classroom with college students, it is reasonable to assume that this technology would have great potential for adult education too. 9/10 extremely exciting and interesting potential future technology for adult education.

    1. Teaching, Technology, and Teacher Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic:

      This article (or at least the section of it presented here) describes one institutions 5-phase model of virtual learning . It examines the state of teacher preparation and professional development in terms of technology and determines that while progress is being made, it is slow and needs to be implemented and focused on more. 4/10, the article itself is not great but it does include an extensive list of references that may be of use later.

    1. Integrating academic and everyday learning through technology: Issues and challenges for researchers, policy makers and practitioners

      This article examines the potential to connect academic with knowledge learned through life and career experience using technology and other traditional methods. Challenges and best practices are presented and all levels of individual and institution are included in the discussion. Rating 8/10. Very interesting idea and cool how many levels of organization are included.

  7. dergipark.org.tr dergipark.org.tr
    1. Blueprint for In-Service Teacher Training Program in Technology Integration

      This article looks at the gap between teacher efficiency in in-person versus online teaching and the need to effectively build teachers' competencies in the are of technology to ensure teachers are not incompetent at teaching online. This study collected data from 122 English language teachers and used the findings to create a blueprint for other institutions hoping to increases teachers' ability to successfully integrate technology into their lessons. 6/10, the study was too small to be truly persuasive scientifically and the findings were more helpful for institutions rather than individual educators.

    1. Toward a Future Adult Learning Community: If Sacra tes Had a PC. .. Toward a Future Adult Learning Community: If Socrates had a PC ...

      In this article both socratic and invisible integration approaches of technology in adult education are examined in an effort to propose a framework for future adult learning communities. Rating is 2/10, this article is much older than anticipated (somehow snuck through the date filter) and was rather outdated given how much technology has changed.

    1. The Impact of Social Media Technologies on Adult Learning

      This article takes on the challenge of investigating what role social media technologies have in adult learning/ their impact on learning outcomes for adult learners. The data showed that social media technologies follow similar patterns to other educational tools. Teaching method used in conjunction with the technology matters significantly. This being said, the article does make several recommendations for using social media in the classroom to boost adult learning outcomes. 10/10 interesting and relevant article with easy to find and utilize recommendations educators could implement.