1,887 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. She was openly critical of the Supreme Court’s decision in Brown vs. Board of Education, which declared racial segregation of public schools unconstitutional. “When Brown comes out, her point is ‘I don’t want to have to force someone to associate with me,’” Strain says. Today she would probably be considered a libertarian.

      Interesting...

    1. Il existe une autre gratuité (que l’on ne saurait pourtant qualifier de « vraie », car elle ne l’est pas réellement), que Jean-Louis Sagot-Duvauroux appelle la gratuité « par cotisation », financée par les impôts, les taxes. Celle des services publics, par exemple, que sont l’éducation, la santé (pour partie), la sécurité, la défense… Le financement en est à la fois connu et méconnu. Cette gratuité-là n’est pas suspecte, mais elle se trouve souvent dévalorisée ou jugée dangereuse. Parce que le bénéficiaire ne perçoit pas la valeur de ce qui lui est offert. De nombreux économistes de la santé, par exemple, regrettent que le coût des soins, des examens de laboratoire, des médicaments ne soit pas toujours perceptible par le patient. Une réflexion de même nature sur le secours en montagne a conduit à faire payer aux alpinistes imprudents certains des frais engagés pour les secourir. En espérant une prise de conscience plus grande.
    1. Around 1956: "My next task was to prepare my course. Since none of the textbooks known to me was satisfactory, I resorted to the maieutic method that Plato had attributed to Socrates. My lectures consisted essentially in questions that I distributed beforehand to the students, and an abstract of the research that they had prompted. I wrote each question on a 6 × 8 card. I had adopted this procedure a few years earlier for my own work, so I did not start from scratch. Eventually I filled several hundreds of such cards, classed them by subject, and placed them in boxes. When a box filled up, it was time to write an article or a book chapter. The boxes complemented my hanging-files cabinet, containing sketches of papers, some of them aborted, as well as some letters." (p. 129)

      This sounds somewhat similar to Mark Robertson's method of "live Roaming" (using Roam Research during his history classes) as a teaching tool on top of other prior methods.

      link to: Roland Barthes' card collection for teaching: https://hypothes.is/a/wELPGLhaEeywRnsyCfVmXQ

  2. Jan 2023
    1. The posture of democratic citizenship is avowal of rights and obligations of membership in a civic community. The rationale for this is the moral and political goodness of a civic way of living and the shared promise of human self-realization through interdependence. As such it is the exemplary, most inclusive form of membership; it is a precondition for the sustainability in the modern secular era of other expressions of membership in our lives—social, economic, kinship, familial, and intimate.[17] Again, citizenship avows—makes a vow, takes on a trust—on behalf of a future of moral and political potential toward which it is reasonable to strive. Citizenship is iterative and ongoing; it provides continuity and provokes innovation; each generation of democratic citizens begins a new story of the demos and continues an ongoing one.[18]

      !- key finding : citizenship is a trusteeship - in which the individual takes on responsibility to participate in upholding the mutually agreed principles and promises leading to collective human self-realization - the individual works with others to collective realize this dream which affects all individuals within the group

      !- implement : TPF / DH / SRG -implement this education program globally as part of Stop Reset Go / Deep Humanity training that recognizes the individual collective entanglement and include in the Tipping Point Festival as well

    1. He points out that the power of takingnotes efficiently does not come by nature, but that,it is an art that improves with cultivation,
    1. Repérer et accompagner les personnes en difficulté avec le numériquerecommandation 16Organiser un test d’évaluation des apprentissages fondamentaux de l’usage du numérique àl’occasion de la journée défense et citoyenneté.Suites données depuis trois ansAu niveau du ministère de l’Éducation nationale : certification PIX au collège et en classe determinale / 1h30 de sciences du numérique en classe de seconde / apprentissage du codage aucollège et au lycée en cours de mathématiques. Négociation en cours entre le GIP PIX et le ministèredes Armées pour intégrer un test dans le cadre de la Journée Défense et Citoyenneté.
    1. He also open-sourced his entire curriculum, templates and all. Link in first comment 👇

      Matt Mochary leader coaching. open-sourced his entire curriculum

    1. FREE Google #Courses you need to take in 2023.

      Free Google Course to take in 2023

      1. Google Analytics for Beginners
  3. Dec 2022
    1. With medicine, the story was slightly different because of theconstant and urgent need for it. Medical knowledge was alwaysuseful, always relevant, so books on medicine were constantly indemand, and would have been available in the majority of libraries inlate antiquity.

      Transmission of medical knowledge has a more immediate and direct application for people; as a result it may tend to be transmitted more faithfully either in written or oral forms. The written record of medical scrolls from antiquity were in constant demand.

    1. FOSSDLE Commons (new OER Foundation project) https://social.fossdle.org/ 4 OERu https://mastodon.oeru.org/ 6 Open EdTech https://openedtech.social/ 8 Fossodon (open source) https://fosstodon.org/ 1 Wikis World (wiki enthusiasts) https://wikis.world 1
    1. “I thought that art schools should just be places where you thought about creative behavior, whereas they thought an art school was a place where you made painters,” he said later.

      We should do better at teaching and training creative behavior in schools. We say that we encourage exploration but somehow do it in all the wrong ways such we discourage it wholly.

    1. The magic bullet of education and skillseliminating poverty is an alluring one, but without a substantial increase in thenumber and quality of opportunities available, it is only a mirage.
    2. Musical Chairs

      The authors analogize educational levels and unemployment rates to playing musical chairs to underline the zero sum game being played in the labor market.

      This becomes a useful argument for why a universal basic income ought to be implemented, not to mention the bullshit job thesis which pairs with it.

    3. What greater education and skills allow an individual to do is to move fur-ther up in the overall queue of people looking to find a well-paying and re-warding job. However, because of the limited number of such jobs, only a setamount of people will be able to land such jobs. Consequently, one’s positionin the queue can change as a result of human capital, but the same amount ofpeople will still be stuck at the end of the line if the overall opportunities re-main the same.

      There is a direct analogy to statistical mechanics and thermodynamics to be drawn here.

    4. Human capital consists of those skills and resources that eachof us brings into the labor market. They include the quantity and quality ofeducation we have attained, job training received, acquired skills and experi-ence, aptitudes and abilities, and so on.
    5. One of the most enduring poverty myths across the political and ideologicalspectrum is that if we were able to provide individuals with enough educationand skills, poverty could be eliminated.
  4. Nov 2022
    1. In the last two years while teaching in various schools and institutions all around the world, we’ve been experimenting with a new workshop format called Design with Other Intelligences.
    1. Donations

      To add some other intermediary services:

      To add a service for groups:

      To add a service that enables fans to support the creators directly and anonymously via microdonations or small donations by pre-charging their Coil account to spend on content streaming or tipping the creators' wallets via a layer containing JS script following the Interledger Protocol proposed to W3C:

      If you want to know more, head to Web Monetization or Community or Explainer

      Disclaimer: I am a recipient of a grant from the Interledger Foundation, so there would be a Conflict of Interest if I edited directly. Plus, sharing on Hypothesis allows other users to chime in.

    1. competition relies upon universal quantification and comparison. The result is that workers, job-seekers and public services of every kind are subject to a pettifogging, stifling regime of assessment and monitoring, designed to identify the winners and punish the losers.

      This cultural entrenchment infects may other areas of activity, including education practice, where a gospel of competeition undermines the core ethos of practice to turn a core function of human culture and civilization into a winnowing process assuring maintainence of privilege.

    1. “Our kids have lost so much—family members, connections to friends and teachers, emotional well-being, and for many, financial stability at home,” the article begins, sifting through a now-familiar inventory of devastation, before turning to a problem of a different order. “And of course, they’ve lost some of their academic progress.”
    1. Analysts have labelled this as “learning loss,” and many have blamed school closures and remote instruction in the course of the past two years as the culprit. Essentially, schools serving largely Black and Latino populations were more likely to turn to remote teaching.
    2. These labor actions underscored the frustrations of teachers, who have had to navigate not only the pandemic but also political harangues about their curricula, as well as insufficient pay and other long-standing issues tied to their actual work as educators. Teachers were already leaving the profession, but stress induced by the pandemic accelerated the pace.
    1. Paper gives surprisingly good overview of models of learning within the cognitive sciences up to 2008. Attempts to dispel myths and summarize the literature on multimodal learning. Link to paper on Semantic Scholar

    2. Scaffolding is the act of providing learners with assistance or support to perform a taskbeyond their own reach if pursued independently when “unassisted.”

      Wood, Bruner, & Ross (1976) define scaffolding as what? (Metiri Group, Cisco Sytems, 2008) The act of providing learners with assistance or support to perform a task beyond their own reach if pursued independently when "unassisted."

      What term do Wood, Bruner, & Ross (1976) define as "The act of providing learners with assistance or support to perform a task beyond their own reach if pursued independently when 'unassisted.'"? (Metiri Group, Cisco Sytems, 2008) Scaffolding

    3. Schemas are chunks of multiple individual units of memory that are linked into a system ofunderstanding

      How do Bransford, Brown, & Cocking (2000) define schemas? (Metiri Group, Cisco Sytems, 2008) As chunks of multiple individual units of memory that are linked into a system of understanding

      What term is defined by Bransford, Brown, & Cocking (2000) to be "chunks of multiple individual units of memory that are linked into a system of understanding"? (Metiri Group, Cisco Sytems, 2008) Schemas.

    4. Learning is defined to be “storage of automated schema in long-term memory.

      How is learning defined by Sweller in 2002? (Metiri Group, Cisco Sytems, 2008) The storage of automated schema in long-term memory

      What term does Sweller define as the "storage of automated schema in long-term memory"?

    1. Hello! Daisy Thomas is my name. I recently earned an Economics Ph.D. degree from the University of Arizona, Tucson, USA. I earned my CSET AND CBEST (Multiple Subjects) teaching certificates on the side and graduated with a 7.75 GPA! I am an expert in Economics, statistics and Money Market. I worked on this Economics Homework Help and for exam purpose take my economics exam website and my client was so impressed with my work and also gave me 9.2/10 ratings. If you want to me to work for you then you can hire me anytime, I will never disappoint you.

    1. two streams of thought which run through the history of education—they areusually called the progressive and the formal.
    2. social historian G. M. Trevelyan (1978) put theissue some time ago, ‘Education...has produced a vast population able to readbut unable to distinguish what is worth reading.’
    3. It’s a basic question—what are children and young people in school for?
    4. As the British prime minister WilliamGladstone put it at the time in the Edinburgh Review, speaking of the remarkablePrussian success in the Franco-Prussian War: ‘Undoubtedly, the conduct of thecampaign, on the German side, has given a marked triumph to the cause ofsystematic popular education.’
    5. it was clear that the European and US competitors werebenefiting from these changes to the curriculum in advances in commerce, inindustry, and even on the battlefield.

      Compulsory education and changes in curriculum in the United States and some of it's competitors in the late 19th century clearly benefitted advances in commerce, industry, and became a factor in national security.

    6. Forster’sAct in 1870, which mandated education for all children up to the age of 10 inBritain.
    7. Samuel Bowles and Herbert Gintis intheir classic Schooling in Capitalist America

      Bowles and Gintis apparently make an argument in Schooling in Capitalist America that changes in education in the late 1800s/early 1900s served the ends of capitalists rather than the people.

    1. https://hypothes.is/search?q=tag%3A%27etc556+etcnau%27

      Randomly ran across a great tag full of education resources...

      Seems to be related to this class:<br /> ETC 556 - Contexts And Methods Of Technology In Adult Education

      Description: This course is designed for adult educators in the various contexts, including: higher education, military, non-profit, health and business settings. Through research, readings and collaborative activities, students will gain an understanding of various adult learning methods that include, but are not limited to, training, professional development, performance improvement, online and mobile learning. Letter grade only.

      https://catalog.nau.edu/Courses/course?courseId=011553&catalogYear=2223

    1. Putting transformative learning theory into practice
      • I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with examples of how transformative learning theory can be put into practice in higher education settings and its limitations.

      -rating 7/10

      Christie, M., Carey, M., Robertson, A., & Grainger, P. (2015). Putting transformative learning theory into practice. Australian journal of adult learning, 55(1), 9-30.

    1. Experiential Learning Theory as a Guide for Experiential Educators in Higher Education

      This article will provide me with an overview of the experiential learning theory and how it can be applied to higher education settings.

      -rating 8/10

      Kolb, A. Y., & Kolb, D. A. (2017). Experiential learning theory as a guide for experiential educators in higher education. Experiential Learning & Teaching in Higher Education, 1(1), 7-44.

    1. Examining some assumptions and limitations of research on the effects of emerging technologies for teaching and learning in higher education

      -I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will give me perspective on the limitations of current research on teaching and learning with technology in higher education settings.

      -rating 8/10

      Kirkwood, A., & Price, L. (2013). Examining some assumptions and limitations of research on the effects of emerging technologies for teaching and learning in higher education. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(4), 536-543.

    1. The integration of information technology in higher education: a study of faculty's attitude towards IT adoption in the teaching process

      -This article will provide me with insight as to faculty's attitudes towards adopting new technologies and incorporating them in higher education settings.

      -rating 7/10

      John, S. P. (2015). The integration of information technology in higher education: A study of faculty's attitude towards IT adoption in the teaching process. Contaduría y administración, 60, 230-252.

    1. Teaching with Technology: Using Tpack to Understand Teaching Expertise in Online Higher Education

      -I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article provides an overview of how midwestern university professors use technology and teaching pedagogies to teach online courses.

      -rating 7/10

      Benson, S. N. K., & Ward, C. L. (2013). Teaching with technology: Using TPACK to understand teaching expertise in online higher education. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 48(2), 153-172.

    2. Teaching with Technology: Using Tpack to Understand Teaching Expertise in Online Higher Education

      -I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article provides an overview of how midwestern university professors use technology and teaching pedagogies to teach online courses.

      -rating 7/10

    1. Using technology for teaching and learning in higher education: a critical review of the role of evidence in informing practice

      -I will download the full article in EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with insight into whether the use of technology in higher education classrooms is effective.

      -rating 6/10

      Price, L., & Kirkwood, A. (2014). Using technology for teaching and learning in higher education: A critical review of the role of evidence in informing practice. Higher Education Research & Development, 33(3), 549-564.

    1. Teaching and technology in higher education: student perceptions and personal reflections

      -I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article provides insight to students perspectives of how they learned with technology in their higher education classrooms.

      -rating 7/10

      Milliken, J., & Barnes, L. P. (2002). Teaching and technology in higher education: student perceptions and personal reflections. Computers & Education, 39(3), 223-235.

    1. Teaching with technology in higher education: understanding conceptual change and development in practice
      • I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with insight on how to use technology to teach in higher education settings. This presents what conceptual change means and how it has been used in higher education settings.

      -rating 6/10

      Englund, C., Olofsson, A. D., & Price, L. (2017). Teaching with technology in higher education: understanding conceptual change and development in practice. Higher Education Research & Development, 36(1), 73-87.

    1. Teaching excellence in higher education: critical perspectives

      -This article will provide me insight on what excellent teaching looks like in higher education settings.

      -rating 6/10

      Gourlay, L., & Stevenson, J. (2017). Teaching excellence in higher education: Critical perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education, 22(4), 391-395.

  5. www.middlesex.mass.edu www.middlesex.mass.edu
    1. Student Involvement: A Developmental Theoryfor Higher Education

      -This article will provide me with an overview of the learning theory known as student involvement and how it can be used in higher education settings.

      -rating 7/10

      Astin, A. W. (1984). Student involvement: A developmental theory for higher education. Journal of college student personnel, 25(4), 297-308.

    1. Evaluation of competence-based teaching in higher education: From theory to practice

      -I will download full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with insight on the evaluation of competence-based teaching theory in higher education and how it is put into practice.

      -rating 8/10

      Bergsmann, E., Schultes, M. T., Winter, P., Schober, B., & Spiel, C. (2015). Evaluation of competence-based teaching in higher education: From theory to practice. Evaluation and program planning, 52, 1-9.

    1. How should the higher education workforce adapt to advancements in technology for teaching and learning?

      -I will download the full article through EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with insight into how to use technology for teaching and learning in higher education settings.

      -rating 8/10

      Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2012). How should the higher education workforce adapt to advancements in technology for teaching and learning?. The Internet and Higher Education, 15(4), 247-254.

    1. Peer-to-peer Teaching in Higher Education: A Critical Literature Review

      -I will download the full article in EBSCO.

      -This article will provide me with information on the popular learning theory of social constructivism and its benefits.

      -rating 7/10

      Stigmar, M. (2016). Peer-to-peer teaching in higher education: A critical literature review. Mentoring & Tutoring: partnership in learning, 24(2), 124-136.

    1. Technology-enhanced learning and teaching in higher education: what is ‘enhanced’ and how do we know? A critical literature review

      -I will download full article in EBSCO.

      -This article will give me some insight on what technology- enhanced learning means and how it has been incorporated in higher education settings.

      rating 7/10

      Kirkwood, A., & Price, L. (2014). Technology-enhanced learning and teaching in higher education: what is ‘enhanced’and how do we know? A critical literature review. Learning, media and technology, 39(1), 6-36.

  6. Oct 2022
    1. Mr. Sunak said in a series of tweets that Britain’s 30 Confucius Institutes, most of which are Chinese government-run facilities located on British university campuses, will be shuttered under his government’s new China policies.  cnxps.cmd.push(function () { cnxps({ playerId: '2dd9afad-0104-402b-b341-830f7d9e8ccc' }).render('52b1f7f094294ef9a64f6c534558cada'); }); “Almost all UK government spending on Mandarin language teaching at school is channeled through university-based Confucius Institutes, thereby promoting Chinese soft power,” Mr. Sunak said. Mr. Sunak also said he will seek a new alliance of free nations to counter Chinese cyber threats and to improve the security of technology, a major target of Chinese covert and overt acquisition.

      It is good to see a significant Western leader cracking down on the so-called Confucius Institutes and explaining why they are threats. I hope that his CCP policies match his series of tweets.

    1. information technology can support organizational memory in twoways, either by making recorded knowledge retrievable or by makingindividuals with knowledge accessible

      I tried to do this in my last role as a lab manager and we have a PhD student spreadsheet I added variables to for this specific purpose.

      Check it out here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/10qMAJjYc7fTGLLSmvrD7pk8v1KeHJYLC47JMBvqxG8A/edit?usp=sharing

    1. Bryan Caplan has made a spirited defense of school as signaling in his book, The Case Against Education. He argues that what is taught in school isn’t particularly useful on the job. Instead, schooling provides a mechanism for figuring out who has the talent, ambition and obedience to learn on the job successfully.
    2. Having an MIT degree is probably more valuable than having an MIT education.
    1. For the sole true end of educationis simply this: to teach men how to learn for themselves; and whateverinstruction fails to do this is effort spent in vain.
    2. disport itself happily in its new and extended Quadrivium withoutpassing through the Trivium. But the scholastic tradition, though broken andmaimed, still lingered in the public schools and universities:

      Is it possible that with the flowering of the storehouse of knowledge and the rise of information overload following Gutenberg's moveable type, we became overly enamored with Sayers' subject-based Quadrivium that we forgot to focus on the basics of the Trivium?

    3. We dole out lip-service to the importance of education—lip-service and, just occasionally, a little grant of money; we postpone theschool leaving-age, and plan to build bigger and better schools; the teachersslave conscientiously in and out of school-hours, till responsibility becomes aburden and a nightmare; and yet, as I believe, all this devoted effort is largelyfrustrated, because we have lost the tools of learning, and in their absencecan only make a botched and piecemeal job of it.
    4. We will endow them with exceptionally docile parents;

      Hilarious that she sees "exceptionally docile parents" as a necessary condition for educational reform!

    5. modern education concentrates onteaching subjects, leaving the method of thinking, arguing, and expressingone’s conclusions to be picked up by the scholar as he goes along;

      Compared to classical education, modern education concentrates on teaching only "subject" areas and relying on one to osmose the methods for thinking, arguing, and properly expressing one's ideas as they proceed, if in fact they do at all.

    1. Émile flew offthe shelves in 18th-century Paris. In fact, booksellers found it more profitable torent it out by the hour than to sell it. Ultimately the excitement got too much forthe authorities and Émile was banned in Paris and burned in Geneva

      Émile: or On Education was so popular that it was rented out by the hour for additional profit instead of being sold outright. [summary]


      When did book rental in education spaces become a business model? What has it looked like historically?

    2. Rousseau’sheretical view was that anything which was outside children’s experience wouldbe meaningless to them, much as Plato, Comenius, and others had warned. Hisinsights had condensed principally out of the prevailing intellectual atmosphereat the time—empiricism, explicated by philosophers such as John Locke. We’lllook at Locke and Rousseau in more detail in Chapter 2.

      Just as the ideas of liberty and freedom were gifted to us by Indigenous North Americans as is shown by Graeber and Wengrow in The Dawn of Everything, is it possible that the same sorts of ideas but within the educational sphere were being transmitted by Indigenous intellectuals to Europe in the same way? Is Rousseau's 18th century book Emile, or On Education of this sort?

      What other sorts of philosophies invaded Western thought at this time?

    3. Jean-Jacques Rousseau, who shockedthe world with Émile: or On Education ([1762] 1993).

      Rousseau, Jean-Jacques. Émile, or On Education. Translated by Alan Bloom. 1762. Reprint, Basic Books, 1979. https://www.basicbooks.com/titles/jean-jacques-rousseau/emile/9780465019311/

    4. Czech teacherComenius (1592–1670). He championed universal education, which hepromoted in his Didactica magna, arguing for the commonality of education—itwas for everyone, including, shockingly, females.

      Comenius championed not only lifelong learning in Didactica magna, but he also argued for educating females, something not commonplace in the 17th century.

    5. Theodulf, bishop of Orléans, hadordered that ‘the priests establish schools in every town and village.
    6. ‘Now, all this study of reckoning and geometry...must be presented to them while still young, not inthe form of compulsory instruction.’ ‘Why so?’ ‘Because,’ said I, ‘a free soul ought not to pursueany study slavishly; for while bodily labours performed under constraint do not harm the body,nothing that is learned under compulsion stays with the mind.’ ‘True,’ he said. ‘Do not, then, myfriend, keep children to their studies by compulsion but by play.’The Republic, 536d–e; 537a

      Apparently one couldn't ever force children to learn anything...

    7. Albert Einstein asserted that‘Education is what remains when we have forgotten everything that has beenlearned at school.’
    8. Winston Churchill’s ‘The only time my educationwas interrupted was while I was at school.’
    9. Mark Twain quipped, ‘I have never let my schooling interfere with myeducation.’
    10. schools and education, are not, sadly, necessarily linked at all

      It's worth keeping in mind that schools and education aren't necessarily linked.

    11. Education: A Very Short Introduction. Second Edition. Very Short Introductions. Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, 2021. https://global.oup.com/academic/product/education-a-very-short-introduction-9780198859086?cc=us&lang=en&

    1. In the context of public schools, it would make sense for the City to consider merging student IDs with travel Metro Cards... well it would if the City wasn't moving away from Metro Cards. Issue would be extending the solution to private schools. However, in this case, the issue is just general NYC incompetence.

    1. The Department of Education has been rolling out its own free grades, attendance and messaging applications, to replace banned third-party software that was involved in a data breach of more than 800,000 students last school year.

      The NYCDOE was correct to sever its tie with third-party services, but why was the default response to build its own service? It was not long ago that there were no mobile applications for grades, attendance, and messaging.

    1. . The goal a reader seeks-be itentertainment, information or understanding-determines theway he reads.

      There are three goals of most reading: education, information, and understanding.


      Are there others we're missing here?

    2. The Activity and Art of Reading 15 If you ask a living teacher a question, he will probably answer you. If you are puzzled by what he says, you can save yourself the trouble of thinking by asking him what he means. If, however, you ask a book a question, you must answer it yourself.

      What effect might this have on the learning process of purely oral cultures?

    1. Wieman, Carl. “How to Become a Successful Physicist.” Physics Today 75, no. 9 (September 2022): 46–52. https://doi.org/10.1063/PT.3.5082

      The details here are also good in teaching almost all areas of knowledge, particularly when problem solving is involved.

      How might one teach the practice of combinatorial creativity?

  7. Sep 2022
    1. Consider another example—education. It is true that in most countries, asin the United States, a higher level of educational attainment is typically as-sociated with a lower risk of economic insecurity. But the penalties associatedwith low levels of educational attainment, and the rewards associated with highlevels of attainment, vary significantly by country. Full-time workers without ahigh school degree in Finland, for instance, report the same earnings as thosewith a high school degree. In the United States, however, these workers ex-perience a 24 percent earnings penalty for not completing high school.23 InNorway, a college degree yields only a 20 percent earnings increase over a highschool degree for full-time workers, versus a much higher 68 percent increase inthe United States.24 The percentage of those with a high school degree earningat or below the poverty threshold is more than 4 times higher in the UnitedStates than in Belgium.25

      The US penalizes those who don't complete high school to a higher degree than other countries and this can tend to lower our economic resiliency.

      American exceptionalism at play?

      Another factor at play with respect to https://hypothes.is/a/2uAmuEENEe2KentYKORSww

    2. Employment, education, and marriage are helpful in both avoiding povertyand exiting faster if one does become poor.
    1. imagine a future where educators are able to trace the impact they have had on learners' journeys. Educators can identify which teaching methods worked best for which learners and which approaches were most effective at enabling the learners to translate that learning into practice

      There is some transformative potential here for these insights to be valuable for Educators as well as to serve as data points that help Learners. be more informed consumers (especially when the data allows for "twinning" that allows for Learners to approximate anticipated outcomes based on historical outcomes for people who share characteristics with them). At the same time, a clear hurdle separating the aspirations from the reality is the priority of the ownership. It seems that for all the exciting potential, getting there necessarily triggers a dynamic of multiple stakeholders having legitimate assertions of ownership over the data, meaning that compromises must be made, and that we may quickly begin to see qualifications to the notion of learner ownership that are a far cry from any absolute, binary interpretation. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but if it is in fact a thing, it's something to be acknowledged and centered so as to avoid appearing (or being) disingenuous brokers of the conversation.

    1. Traditionally, doctoral students are expected to implicitly absorb thisargument structure through repeated reading or casual discussion.

      The social annotation being discussed here is geared toward classroom work involving reading and absorbing basic literature in an area of the sort relating to lower level literature reviews done for a particular set of classes.

      It is not geared toward the sort of more hard targeted curated reading one might do on their particular thesis topic, though this might work in concert with a faculty advisor on a 1-1 basis.

      My initial thought on approaching the paper was for the latter and not the former.

    2. Unfortunately, many graduate and professional students rely onreading strategies taught in high school or college for their academicwork. One example is taking notes only during lectures andhighlighting passages of academic texts

      It seems broadly true in the new millennium and potentially much earlier that students are not taught broader reading strategies within academic settings. The history of note taking strategies and teaching would indicate that this wasn't always true.

      In prior centuries there was more focus in earlier education on grounding in the trivium and quadrivium including rhetoric. These pieces and their fundamentals are now either glossed over or skipped altogether to focus more training on what might be considered more difficult and more important material. It would seem that educational reforms from the late 1500s shifted the focus on some of these prior norms to focus on other materials, and in particular reforms in the early 1900s (Charles William Eliot , et al) which focused on training a workforce for a more industrialized and capitalistic society weaned many of these methods out of earlier curricula. This results in students dramatically under-prepared for doctoral research, analysis, and writing.

    1. California Could Mandate Kindergarten— What’s This Mean For School Districts And Childcare Providers?A bill that would create a mandatory kindergarten program in California has passed the legislature and is now heading to governor Gavin Newsom’s office for a final decision. The legislation, Senate Bill 70, would require children to complete one year of kindergarten before they’re admitted to the first grade. This comes as districts in California struggle with enrollment, having been a major issue during the pandemic. But if this legislation were to be signed by Governor Newsom, how would it affect teachers, the child care industry, and the children themselves.Today on AirTalk, we discuss the bill and it support among public schools with Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) superintendent Alberto Carvalho and Justine Flores, licensed childcare provider in Los Angeles and a negotiation representative for Child Care Providers United.

      Timestamps 19:11 - 35:20

      CA Senate Bill 488 2021; signed, in process,

      Orton-Gillingham method (procedure/process) but can be implemented differently. Rigorous and works. Over 100 years old.

      Wilson program uses pieces of OG. What's this? Not enough detail here.

      Dyslexia training will be built into some parts of credentialling programs.

      Each child is different.

      This requires context knowledge on the part of the teacher and then a large tool bag of methods to help the widest variety of those differences.

      In the box programs don't work because children are not one size fits all.

      Magic wand ? What would you want?

      Madhuri would like to have: - rigorous teaching in early grades - if we can teach structured literacy following a specific scope in sequence most simple to most complex - teaching with same familiar patterns over and over - cumulative (builds on itself) - multisensory - explicit - Strong transitional kindergarten through grade 3 instruction

      Prevention trumps intervention.

      Otherwise you're feeding into the school to prison pipeline.

      Madhuri's call for teaching that is structured, cumulative, multisensory, and explicit sounds a lot like what I would imagine orality-based instruction looks like as well. The structure there particularly makes it easier to add pieces later on in a way that literacy doesn't necessarily.

  8. Aug 2022
    1. NAAL defines literacy as both task-based and skills-based.

      I wonder if there are also soft skills in literacy

    2. NAAL defines literacy as both task-based and skills-based

      I wonder if there are also soft skills in literacy/

    1. Teaching suggestions for diversifying logic courses and suggestions for how to make logic more accessible for students from a wide variety of backgrounds included getting rid of genius culture and stereotypes in logic, focusing on logic as a practical tool which requires practice to get good at, using low-cost materials, implementing mastery grading and providing mentorship opportunities.

      Oh, come on. "Genius culture" exists in all academia to one degree or another. To say that logic is somehow more susceptible to this than other disciplines is stunningly arrogant and cloistered thinking.

    1. the task maybe undertaken by any instructor who finds that good notesare necessary for successful work in his course.

      Just as physics and engineering professors don't always rely on the mathematics department to teach all the mathematics that students should know, neither should any department rely on the English department to teach students how to take notes.

    1. Marketing. For example, information about your device type and usage data may allow us to understand other products or services that may be of interest to you.

      All of the information above that has been consented to, can be used by NetGear to make money off consenting individuals and their families.

    2. USB device

      This gives Netgear permission to know what you plug into your computer, be it a FitBit, a printer, scanner, microphone, headphones, webcam — anything not attached to your computer.

    3. as well as and other software, mobile apps, and features.

      This could give Netgear the consent to watch every application you use, from The Sims to SETI to Photoshop to You Need A Budget.

    1. The potential for digital technology to support learners in this process was highlighted in the studies reviewed, but commonly learners lacked the competence to use digital technologies for educational purposes. Learners often required support, especially with the planning and reviewing aspects of self-directed learning, as well as guidance regarding how digital technologies can be used effectively for educational purposes. Importantly, studies that focus on understanding the facilitation of self-directed learning in childhood education are seldom. Further studies on self-directed learning in childhood education are vital – given that this is a fundamental competence for preparing our youth to deal with work and life in our rapidly changing world.

      Learners often required support, especially with the planning and reviewing aspects of self-directed learning, as well as guidance regarding how digital technologies can be used effectively for educational purposes. Importantly, studies that ..

    1. Monasteries and convents served as models for the dorm and for the campus itself. Walled off from a threatening medieval world, they provided security for contemplation and worship while also serving as a place where learning, the arts, music, horticulture, and other cultural activities might flourish.

      College dormitories rooted in monastery and convent styles

    1. In U.S.schools, young people, regardless of their race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status, live amidenduring patterns of social and economic inequality. Indeed, American public schools arecharacterized by the many significant gaps between communities in the provision of educationand educational enrichment opportunities (Kozol 2012)

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  9. Jul 2022
    1. 3D universes create a collaborative space with which we can analyze different objects or concepts simultaneously, providing more detail in our teaching approach because teaching in virtual reality increases the depth of knowledge,”

      virtual reality increases the depth of our knowledge

    1. We don’t expect National Defence or health care to promote growth: we just accept that territorial integrity and a healthy populace are good things.

      Been making that point about health (especially since, like education, it's a provincial jurisdiction). It's easy to think of perverse incentives if a profit motive dominates education and health. Physicians would want people to remain sick and teachers would prefer it if learners required more assistance.

      Hadn't thought enough about the DND part. Sure gives me pause, given the amounts involved. Or the fact that there's a whole lot of profit made in that domain.

      So, businesspeople are quick to talk about "cost centres". Some of them realize that those matter a whole lot.

    1. They're drawing primarily from students with the following broad interests: - learning sciences / educational psychology - sociology of education (to influence policy/practice) - those with strong real-world experience (looking to apply it to a specific area)

      tuition coverage & stipend<br /> must be based in Baltimore<br /> prefer one speaks to faculty members for alignment of research areas and mentorship prior to joining

    1. 这本书提出的一个问题是,我们应该在多大程度上将亚裔的成功归因于文化差异。这是一个非常有争议的话题,原因不难理解,如果你说亚裔美国人的文化规范能够帮助他们在学业上表现出色,那么问题就会转向为什么其他人群表现不佳。对这个问题,你的研究有什么发现吗?

      Asian culture values education which I believe was implanted through their long history. The learned the lesson that to survive, to live better live, to have ore power, they need higher degree. It is such good question to think that maybe other culture that do not have this ideology build in will be disadvantaged.

    1. Think about the sad essay we all used to write for your (insert language here) class: back then you didn’t have permission to generate original ideas.

      I'm not sure that's the correct diagnosis.

      Alternative take: you were not, at that point in your life, equipped to understand that you could be generating new ideas and that you should walk away from that writing course with an appreciation for writing as a vehicle for what you'd like to accomplish with a given subject/format. It's fine that you didn't—many people don't—and your instructors, institution, parents, community, etc. probably could have done a better job at communicating this to you, but it was there, and it was the point all along.

    1. During the seventeenth century, this associative view vanished and was replaced by more literallydescriptive views simply of the thing as it exists in itself.

      The associative emblematic worldview prevalent prior to the seventeenth century began to disappear within Western culture as the rise of the early modern period and the beginning of the scientific revolution began to focus on more descriptive modes of thought and representation.


      Have any researchers done specific work on this shift from emblematic to the descriptive? What examples do they show which support this shift? Any particular heavy influences?

      This section cites:<br /> William B. Ashworth, Jr. “Natural History and the Emblematic World View,” in Reappraisals of the Scientific Revolution, David C. Lindberg and Robert S. Westfall, eds #books/wanttoread<br /> which could be a place to start.


      Note that this same shift from associative and emblematic to descriptive and pedantic coincides not only with the rise of the scientific revolution but also with the effects of rising information overload in a post-Gutenberg world as well as the education reforms of Ramus (late 1500s) et al. as well as the beginning of the move away from scholasticism.


      Is there any evidence to support claims that this worldview stemmed from pagan traditions and cultures and not solely the art of memory traditions from ancient Greece? Could it have been pagan traditions which held onto these and they were supplemented and reinforced by ecclesiastical forces which used the Greek traditions?


      Examples of emblematic worldview: - particular colors of flowers meant specific things (red = love, yellow = friendship, etc.) We still have these or remants - Saints had their associative animals and objects - anniversary gifts had associative meanings (paper, silver, gold, etc.) We still have remnants of these things, though most are associated with wealth (gold, silver, platinum anniversaries). When did this tradition actually start? - what were the associative meanings of rabbits, turtles, and other animals which appear frequently in manuscript marginalia? (We have the example of the bee (Latin: apes) which where frequently used this way as being associated with the idea of imitation.) - other broad categories?

    1. Unfortunately, many corporate software programsaim to level or standardise the differences betweenindividual workers. In supporting knowledgeworkers, we should be careful to provide tools whichenable diversification of individuals’ outputs.Word-processors satisfi this criterion; tools whichembed a model of a knowledge worker’s task in thesoftware do not.

      Tools which allow for flexibility and creativity are better for knowledge workers than those which attempt to crystalize their tasks into ruts. This may tend to force the outputs in a programmatic way and thereby dramatically decrease the potential for innovative outputs. If the tools force the automation of thought without a concurrent increase in creativity then one may as well rely on manual labor for their thinking.


      This may be one of the major flaws of tools for thought in the educational technology space. They often attempt to facilitate the delivery of education in an automated way which dramatically decreases the creativity of the students and the value of the overall outputs. While attempting to automate education may suit the needs of institutions which are delivering the education, particularly with respect to the overall cost of delivery, the automation itself is dramatically at odds with the desire to expand upon ideas and continue innovation for all participants involved. Students also require diverse modes of input (seen/heard) as well as internal processing followed by subsequent outputs (written/drawn/sculpted/painted, spoken/sung, movement/dance). Many teachers don't excel at providing all of these neurodiverse modes and most educational technology tools are even less flexible, thus requiring an even larger panoply of them (often not interoperable because of corporate siloing for competitive reasons) to provide reasonable replacements. Given their ultimate costs, providing a variety of these tools may only serve to increase the overall costs of delivering education or risk diminishing the overall quality. Educators and institutions not watching out for these traps will tend to serve only a small portion of their intended audiences, and even those may be served poorly as they only receive a limited variety of modalities of inputs and outputs. As an example Western cultures' overreliance on primary literacy modes is their Achilles' heel.


      Tools for thought should actively attempt to increase the potential solution spaces available to their users, while later still allowing for focusing of attention. How can we better allow for the divergence of ideas and later convergence? Better, how might we allow for regular and repeated cycles of divergence and convergence? Advanced zettelkasten note taking techniques (which also allow for drawing, visual, auditory and other modalities beyond just basic literacy) seem to allow for this sort of practice over long periods of time, particularly when coupled with outputs which are then published for public consumption and divergence/convergence cycles by others.

      This may also point out some of the stagnation allowed by social media whose primary modes is neither convergence nor divergence. While they allow for the transmission/communication portion, they primarily don't actively encourage their users to closely evaluate the transmitted ideas, internalize them, or ultimately expand upon them. Their primary mode is for maximizing on time of attention (including base emotions including excitement and fear) and the lowest levels of interaction and engagement (likes, retweets, short gut reaction commentary).

    1. Thanks for all the fantastic literature tips! Added to the list 😊

      If these are the types of things that are interesting, you might also try a shared bibliography that a handful of readers/researchers share and contribute to: https://www.zotero.org/groups/4676190/tools_for_thought

    2. I've spend a lot of time in the education, pedagogy, and instructional design spaces in the past decade. I can guarantee you that he hasn't solved the problem. People have been talking about education reform for centuries and it's still no where close to being solved. If anything perhaps it's even gotten worse, particularly in Western culture.

      If this is your area, I'd recommend taking a look at some of Andy Matuschak's work on mnemonic medium and Lynne Kelly's work on orality and memory which take some non-standard approaches to some of these wholly unsolved questions. Annie Murphy Paul's recent book The Extended Mind will also outline some fun recent work and potentially show you gaping holes in the thought enterprise.

    1. The richest 10 percent accounted for over half (52 percent) of the emissions added to the atmosphere between 1990 and 2015. The richest one percent were responsible for 15 percent of emissions during this time – more than all the citizens of the EU and more than twice that of the poorest half of humanity (7 percent).

      This is a key leverage point strategy for Stop Reset Go for Rapid Whole System Change (RWSC) strategy. As argued by Kevin Anderson https://youtu.be/mBtehlDpLlU, the wealthy are a crucial subculture to target and success can lead to big decarbonization payoffs.

      The key is to leverage what contemplative practitioners and happiness studies both reveal - after reaching a specific level of material needs being met, which is achievable for staying within planetary boundaries, we don’t need any more material consumption to be happy. We need an anti-money song: https://youtu.be/_awAH-JJx1kamd and enliven Martin Luther King Junior’s quote aspirational: the only time to look down at another person is to give them a hand up. Educate the elites on the critical role they now play to solve the double problem of i equality and runaway carbon emissions.

    1. Sep 26, 2016 — Skills for innovation. Education policies to foster innovation have traditionally focused on increasing participation in science, technology ...
  10. Jun 2022
    1. Open educational resources (OERs) are fungible functional units used in education by both educators and students

      OERs on Ethereum

    1. This reveals that we have the capacity for sustained attention, but persistence is best understood as a disposition, not a capacity. The triadic model of dispositions allows us to understand better what is going on here. A behaviour becomes a disposition when we combine the capabilities it demands with the desire to use them and an awareness of situations where the behaviour is appropriate.

      I guess it depends on what a "disposition" is too. One definition is "a person's inherent qualities of mind and character." But if it's inherent, then it's not something that emerges from behaviours in the right circumstances.

    2. Contrary to popular belief, students don’t have short attention spans. They can focus for hours on a single project. But it has to feel relevant and meaningful to them, and they need to have the time and the space to accomplish it. It’s not easy in a world of school bells and curriculum maps. However, it’s something we should strive for. We should draw students into the deeper, slower work of creativity — because when that happens, learning feels like magic. - “Myth and Mystery of Shrinking Attention Span” - Dr K. R. Subramanian

      This should be motivation enough for instructors to take the time - assuming their bureaucratic overloads allow it - to find ways to make education relevant. This is something, however, that must be baked into people at a young age. And that's the real problem.

    3. We are used to instant gratification. Multiple opportunities for engagement and distraction surround us. If the result we are after does not come immediately, it is easy to seek an alternate path. An economy built on fast food, same-day home delivery, open all hours service model feeds our desire for instant results. Buy now, pay later, why wait when you can have it now.?

      We need to slow down - in every aspect of our lives - so we can attend to the present more thoughtfully, seriously, and appreciatively. Now will never happen again.

    4. “Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan Press On! has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race.” - Calvin Coolidge

      This is clearly a political statement intended to get more people to contribute to the country's economy. It is, however, woefully wrong in the broader sense.

      Persistence does matter, but it isn't "omnipotent". Persistence, like education, can and should be acquired. But without talent and intelligence (and curiosity, and honour, and truthfulness, and...), persistence alone will not suffice.

    1. For Jerome Bruner, the place to begin is clear: “One starts somewhere—where the learner is.”

      One starts education with where the student is. But mustn't we also inventory what tools and attitudes the student brings? What tools beyond basic literacy do they have? (Usually we presume literacy, but rarely go beyond this and the lack of literacy is too often viewed as failure, particularly as students get older.) Do they have motion, orality, song, visualization, memory? How can we focus on also utilizing these tools and modalities for learning.

      Link to the idea that Donald Trump, a person who managed to function as a business owner and president of the United States, was less than literate, yet still managed to function in modern life as an example. In fact, perhaps his focus on oral modes of communication, and the blurrable lines in oral communicative meaning (see [[technobabble]]) was a major strength in his communication style as a means of rising to power?

      Just as the populace has lost non-literacy based learning and teaching techniques so that we now consider the illiterate dumb, stupid, or lesser than, Western culture has done this en masse for entire populations and cultures.

      Even well-meaning educators in the edtech space that are trying to now center care and well-being are completely missing this piece of the picture. There are much older and specifically non-literate teaching methods that we have lost in our educational toolbelts that would seem wholly odd and out of place in a modern college classroom. How can we center these "missing tools" as educational technology in a modern age? How might we frame Indigenous pedagogical methods as part of the emerging third archive?

      Link to: - educational article by Tyson Yunkaporta about medical school songlines - Scott Young article "You should pay for Tutors"


      aside on serendipity

      As I was writing this note I had a toaster pop up notification in my email client with the arrival of an email by Scott Young with the title "You should pay for Tutors" which prompted me to add a link to this note. It reminds me of a related idea that Indigenous cultures likely used information and knowledge transfer as a means of payment (Lynne Kelly, Knowledge and Power). I have commented previously on the serendipity of things like auto correct or sparks of ideas while reading as a means of interlinking knowledge, but I don't recall experiencing this sort of serendipity leading to combinatorial creativity as a means of linking ideas,

    2. Collegial pedagogy, a term introduced by Lissa Soep and Vivian Chávez, describes a dynamic where both teacher and learner stand mutually invested in a shared project, where neither party could complete the work without the other. They need each other to get it right. “Collegiality is a relationship of shared collective responsibility.”
    3. Best practices will not give these students voices. Best practices will not help them build community. Best practices will not align them with their own agency. You have to do that.

      This makes me wonder how one might take a community chat space like the IndieWeb chat and replicate the experience for a classroom or for an entire university? It would require a huge amount of tummeling?

    4. We become convinced, because the LMS doesn’t measure for such things, that online there are no pregnant pauses, no under-the-breath chuckling, no eye rolls.

      phatic communication is important in the social interaction components of education

      How can this be put into edtech?

    5. Jesse Stommel and I wrote once that, In the room with our students, we can know if they’re engaged and participating, even as each of them participates in his or her own unique fashion. In an online discussion forum, it’s difficult to observe such nuance, and impossible to quantitatively evaluate it.

      The answer shouldn't necessarily be to figure out how to quantify the online unseen portions of the learning process.

      Similarly how might one assess the end results of things which are non-literate?