1,511 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jun 2021
    1. I passed all of them except for my math. My senior year I actually passed it, but I didn't graduate. I just would go to school, literally eat lunch, just get out. It got boring for me and I was really good. I should have never started.

      Time in US - education - dropping out - not graduating

    2. So I would always try to focus every little bit of energy on my schoolwork, trying to be the best at it, because I wanted to show everybody even if you don't got nothing, there's still something. There's still something to fight for.

      Time in US - employment - job

    3. So sometimes I would have to miss school, sometimes I wouldn't go to school. So then it was chaos.

      Time in US - education - employment

    4. It kind of messed me up, got me depressed a little bit. I started hanging out with bad people, doing the wrong things, and I dropped out my senior year.

      Time in the US - Immigration status - being secretive - lost opportunities - sadness, disillusionment

    5. After that I got to the United States and I started going to school. I didn't really know English, so that was kind of tough, but I picked it up quick, because kids out there are just like—or kids anywhere you know how they could be.

      Time in US - picking up English - education

    6. I passed all of them except for my math. My senior year I actually passed it, but I didn't graduate. I just would go to school, literally eat lunch, just get out. It got boring for me and I was really good. I should have never started.

      Time in the US - Dropping out of school - higher education

    1. Ong puts it this way:“Ramus can adopt memory intodialectic because his entire topically conceived logic is itself a system of local memory”(Ramus280).However, it is a simplified systemunlike the classical one: The ancient precepts about images and theirfacilitation of invention have been dropped.

      What is gained and lost in the Ramist tradition versus the method of loci?

      There is some simplicity to be sure and structure/organization aid in the structured memory.

      We lose the addition work, creativity, and invention. We also loose some of the interest that students might have. I recently read something to the effect that we always seem to make education boring and dull. (cross reference this, which I haven't read: https://daily.jstor.org/why-school-is-boring/)

      How does this interact with Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's idea of flow? Does Ramism beat out the fun of flow?

      How also, is this similar to Kelly's idea of the third archive as a means of bringing these all back together?

    1. Luisa: I wanted to be challenged and I did my research. Whitney Young is supposed to be for people who are gifted and I wanted to be challenged. I wanted something more. Everything has always been extremely easy for me. When I put my mind to it, I get what I want. It sounds bad, but it's true. I think the problem with human beings is that you’re your only true enemy. You block yourself from doing everything in life, and the moment that you accept you can do everything, you can actually do everything [Laughs, sniffles].Luisa: That's what I wanted. I wanted a challenge. I wanted something more. I wanted teachers who actually listened. I wanted teachers who paid attention. I didn't want teachers who were bored and sick of it because these students are like Puerto Rican and gang members and they don't matter. I didn't want that. I wanted somebody who cared, but I didn't get that. I kind of got it. I got the IB program, which was great [Chuckles]. Still not a challenge. It was still not a challenge.

      Time in the US, School, Working Hard/ Getting Good Grades

    2. Mr. R. is the best teacher I have had and he changed my life. Mr. R is a beautiful, beautiful, beautiful human being. [Pause] I had a lot of teachers that would not … They would question me and they would ... All the stuff that I would write, they would question if I was okay mentally because of all this darkness [Chuckles] that I would write about, because a lot of my stories or a lot of my poetry was extremely dark. I don't think that's a bad thing you know. I think that's just trying to get rid of the … it's a catalyst. You're trying to get rid of everything that's inside of you, and that's how I did it.

      Time in the US - mentor - teachers - education

    3. I think in fourth grade was the first largest book that I read. It was the Bram Stoker's Dracula, the big one. That was the first biggest book that I read, and then I had an obsession with Roald Dahl. Roald Dahl was my thing. I loved Roald Dahl. The BFG, the Twitches, the Witches, all of it, I loved it. I loved it. I loved it. Matilda, Matilda. Oh, my God. I loved Matilda. Roald Dahl was a huge thing -- as well childrens’ books -- but I was also reading adult books at the same time. Around this time is when I started getting my obsession with the Holocaust, with all this tragedy.

      Time in US - passing the time - reading books - learning - education

    4. In Miss S. class, I remember there were two boys who were nice to me, J___ and— what's his name? Sorry. I still know him. He's still a good friend of mine. O___. They both kind of spoke Spanish, so they kind of helped me out as well, but I wasn't allowed to speak to anyone. The teacher was not having it … She was extremely strict. I think she was the kind of teacher that should not have ever taken up teaching as a job because some people just don't have the vocation. Is that the word in English? They don't have that in them and I don't think she had it, but they helped out a lot. J___ and Osvaldo, thank you wherever you are now. I know O___ is getting married soon, so yes.

      Time in US - Fitting in - making friends - primary education

    5. Yes, [Chuckles] very sarcastic. Did not speak a lick of Spanish. Not one sentence. I don't think she knew how to pronounce anything, and she was as WASP [White Anglo-Saxon Protestant] as you can get. This woman would get extremely frustrated with me—extremely—and I didn't know what was going on. To me, it was a completely … [Disgusted sound] it was mind-boggling how I could go from—I knew how to read and write in Spanish. I was a pretty smart kid. I knew how to read and write in Spanish at six years old. So I go into first grade and I can't even understand what my teachers are saying, so it was extremely frustrating and this teacher found it extremely frustrating as well, so she would lay me down face down half the day on the magic carpet where she would read stories to everyone because she didn't want to deal with it anymore. I told my mom—

      Time in the US - education - primary school - learning English -

    1. he actual ratio of face-to-face to online instruction can differ greatly and still be considered hybrid instruction

      Really important for two reason - (1) we may not mean the same thing so we should clarify what we're talking about when in conversation on this important issue; and (2) What works in one course/setting may not work in another - great reminder to honor the unique nature of courses/settings.

    2. Hybridity, by definition, is the combination of more than one thing, and thus hybrid teaching and learning will not ascribe to one set of rules; rather, it will ask students to be flexible and practice resilience, thinking critically about the nuance of context and the shifting roles and expectations for themselves and others therein.

      Great reminder that this is a Brave New World! Old thinking doesn't match new realities, although of course it informs us.

  3. May 2021
    1. Some people, regardless of their experience level are horrible as teachers. A school teacher gets asked the same question every year. Every year they answer them, even if it seems redundant, and the answers are simple to THEM. Teaching requires patience and the acceptance of being asked "dumb questions" repeatedly. If they cannot handle that, then they should simply not teach or pretend to be a teacher.
    1. I like the idea of where Downes is going here in taking a book and turning it into a feed for a course.

      Could professors create a syllabus at the start of the semester and then add things to a main class feed slowly over time in combination with feeds from various students to unroll the course over time?

    1. A few years ago, our Republican governor proposed amending the Wisconsin state system’s mission statement to suggest that the university’s purpose wasn’t to “seek the truth” or “improve the human condition,” but was instead, according to the legislature, “to meet the state’s workforce needs.”
    1. Education is based on wrong principles and a wrong design (Piotr Wozniak, 2017)

      From an SRS Guru manifesto

    1. MMScotofGlasgow

      @MMScotofGlasgow, Hopefully it's not too late...

      Francis Yates discusses Petrus Ramus as an educational reformer in Chapter 10 and onward in The Art of Memory. There she outlines Ramus' crusade against images (based in part on the admonition from 4 Deuteronomy about graven images) and on their prurient use (sex, violence, etc.) which were meant to make things more memorable. Ramism caught on in the late 1500's and essentially removed memory by the root from the subject of rhetoric of which it had been an integral part. Ramus felt that structure and rote memorization would suffice in its stead. As a result the method of loci decreased in prominence in schools and disappeared from the scene based on educational reform which was primarily pushed by Huguenot/Protestants. I've not read anywhere that the practice was ever banned, it just fell out of fashion due to these reforms.

      I'm sure it didn't help that printed books became ever cheaper during/after this time and so the prior need to memorize for those reasons wasn't helped either.

      I'm sure another confounding factor was Erasmus' Copia: Foundations of the Abundant Style (1512) which dramatically popularized the keeping and use of commonplace books by the learned and literate. These became a regular place in which people collected and kept their thoughts and ideas rather than memorizing them as they may have done in the past.

    1. The foremost consideration with respect to teaching of the Australian Aboriginal memory technique is the cultural safety aspect and respect for the peoples who developed this approach. In our program, the teaching of this program was administered by an experienced Australian Aboriginal Educator, who was able to integrate the method into our teaching program, while simultaneously preventing several breaches of cultural etiquette and terminology which could easily have compromised the material had it been delivered by a non-Australian Aboriginal educator (TY), however well-intentioned. The need for a deep knowledge and understanding of the appropriate context for teaching and delivery of this material is probably the main factor which would preclude more widespread adoption of this technique.

      I really appreciate the respect given to indigenous knowledge here.

      The researchers could have gone much further in depth in describing it and the aspects of what they mean by cultural "safety". They've done a disservice here by downplaying widespread adoption. Why not? Why couldn't we accord the proper respect of traditions to actively help make these techniques more widespread? Shouldn't we be willing to do the actual work to accord respect and passing on of these knowledges?

      Given my reading in the area, there seems to be an inordinate amount of (Western) "mysticism" attributed to these techniques (here and in the broader anthropology literature) rather than approaching them head-on from a more indigenous perspective. Naturally the difficult part is being trusted enough by tribal elders to be taught these methods to be able to pass them on. (Link this idea to Tim Ingold's first chapter of Anthropology: Why It Matters.)

      All this being said, the general methods known from the West, could still be modified to facilitate in widespread adoption of those techniques we do know. Further work and refinement of them could continue apace while still maintaining the proper respect of other cultures and methods, which should be the modern culture default.

      If nothing else, the West could at least roll back the educational reforms which erased their own heritage to regain those pieces. The West showing a bit of respect for itself certainly wouldn't be out of line either.

    2. The qualitative data collected in this project clearly indicate that this learning approach is pleasurable and productive in itself, and may well have a role in decreasing the ‘drudgery’ often associated with modern higher education.

      This idea has been known historically for centuries. It's only with education "reforms" in the 1500's that things have become markedly worse in Western education.

    3. It is thus argued that early exposure to the Australian Aboriginal approach to pedagogy in a respectful, culturally safe manner, has the potential to benefit medical students and their patients.

      Forget medical students and patients, this could broadly be applied to everyone everywhere! Why limit it to simply medical education?

    4. Most (95%) students indicated that they found the technique effective, and over half (56%) indicated that they would definitely employ the method in their future studies.

      However, I suspect that without prompting or repeated uses and examples, the percentage of students who actually do is likely abysmally poor.

  4. Apr 2021
    1. I like how Dr. Pacheco-Vega outlines some of his research process here.

      Sharing it on Twitter is great, and so is storing a copy on his website. I do worry that it looks like the tweets are embedded via a simple URL method and not done individually, which means that if Twitter goes down or disappears, so does all of his work. Better would be to do a full blockquote embed method, so that if Twitter disappears he's got the text at least. Images would also need to be saved separately.

    1. Rajiv reminded us that: “Openness can be leveraged for justice, but it can also do harm. Closed practices can also do harm, but there are times when closed is the empowered choice. Choice is key. We must serve justice, rather than merely being open.”
    1. Problems with accessibility and considerations of disability that are specific to online teaching and learning;The way in which traditional teaching methods and approaches tend to gloss over trauma or ignore it completely;The fact that so many college students are hungry or homeless while still trying to get good grades;The general lack of good digital pedagogies that reinforce and hold up the human person and their needs;The overall dearth of solid, meaningful professional development available to faculty—professional development that goes beyond the advice about putting images in your course and creating video lectures, and that really tries to tackle what it means to teach online.

      Evergreen concerns in online ed, even after covid is over (or more manageable).

    2. Silence has power and silence has vulnerability. That person maintaining the silence wields the power, and that person waiting on a response is subject to that power. Knowing that, critical pedagogy looks at the relationship between the silent person and the person listening for an answer for clues about agency, oppression, and what change might be needed to make that relationship more democratic.

      Important to think of what we're communicating, intentionally or otherwise.

    3. It may seem that the pedagogist sits back and scans the horizon of education for new things to talk about, but that could not be farther from the truth. The critical pedagogist is one whose practice undergoes constant revision in the interests of creating greater and more effective means for students, and other humans, to thrive.

      Really great reminder that humanity and flourishing are the end goals; not cool ed tech.

    1. This new meeting control is ideal for teachers, and it should definitely help them penalize students who are consistently late for their online classes.

      This is really terrible framing for this issue. We should not be promoting a penal culture for education.

    1. Since I’m doing that, I’m also considering whether it makes sense for me to have a substack blog as well?

      Given some of the press Substack has gotten in the past few months, I think there's more to be said for actively leaving Substack to move to WordPress or some other platform where you can use your own domain name and content.

      Congratulations on the move!

    1. L’instruction, c’est l’acquisition de connaissances grâce à l’enseignement. L’éducation, c’est le développement de la capacité à être soi tout en étant avec les autres, à ménager ses relations avec eux, à participer à la vie sociale, à intérioriser la culture commune. On peut être convenablement éduqué et socialisé sans pour autant être très instruit. Mais on ne peut pas s’instruire, on ne désire pas apprendre si, d’abord, on ne bénéficie pas d’une certaine socialisation.
    1. about the eonxr platform that might work in terms of education so um a little bit of background i've been a faculty member for nearly 35 years and so my main interest here is in the learning
    1. Not only is it kind to do so, but it creates a mini-relationship with people who will be key to our success.

      Online analog could be getting to know the help desk/tech support/instructional designers prior to the course launching. Or, at least familiarizing yourself with what to do when those issues pop up!

    2. Finally, arriving early enables us to make contacts with early arriving attendees.

      Online ed analogy could be reaching out to students via email or phone prior to class start date.

    1. DM gives you simple but/and powerful tools to mark up, annotate and link your own networked collections of digital images and texts. Mark up your image and text documents with highlights that you can then annotate and link together. Identify discreet moments on images and texts with highlight tools including dots, lines, rectangles, circles, polygons, text tags, and multiple color options. Develop your projects and publications with an unlimited number of annotations on individual highlights and entire image and text documents. Highlights and entire documents can host an unlimited number of annotations, and annotations themselves can include additional layers of annotations. Once you've marked up your text and image documents with highlights and annotations, you can create links between individual highlights and entire documents, and your links are bi-directional, so you and other viewers can travel back and forth between highlights. Three kinds of tools, entire digital worlds of possible networks and connections.

      This looks like the sort of project that @judell @dwhly @remikalir and the Hypothes.is team may appreciate, if nothing else but for the user interface set up and interactions.

      I'll have to spin up a copy shortly to take a look under the hood.

    1. N’est-ce pas plutôt le signe de la difficulté pour les établissements à mettre en place une véritable politique éducative, prise en charge par tous à chaque instant de la vie de l’élève, en classe comme hors de la classe ?
  5. Mar 2021
    1. I've come across about 20 reference for Ivan Illitch over the past month. Not sure what is driving it. Some mentions are coming out of educator circles, others from programmers, some from what I might describe as "knowledge workers" (digital gardeners/Roam Cult/Obsidian crowds). One tangential one was from someone in the hyperlink.academy crowd.

      Here's a recent one from today that popped up within a thread shared in IndieWeb chat:

      Ivan Illich continues to be even more more relevant than he was at the height of his New Left popularity. Conviviality in the digital tools we use has continued to wither https://t.co/D88V6KL7Ez pic.twitter.com/OFDYTjXyCn

      — Count Bla (@123456789blaaa) March 15, 2021
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      Deschooling Society and Tools for Conviviality look very interesting. Perhaps they've distilled enough that their ideas are having a resurgence?

    2. His first book, Deschooling Society, published in 1971, was a groundbreaking critique of compulsory mass education. He argued the oppressive structure of the school system could not be reformed. It must be dismantled in order to free humanity from the crippling effects of the institutionalization of all of life. He went on to critique modern mass medicine. In the pre-Internet age, Illich was highly influential among intellectuals and academics. He became known worldwide for his progressive polemics about how human culture could be preserved and expand, activity expressive of truly human values, in the face of multiple thundering forces of de-humanization.

      A fairly reasonable summary of his thinking?

    1. I hadn't really thought that much about the pedagogical aspects (they don't really teach PhD historians pedagogy where I went to school, or I missed it somehow, so I've been trying to educate myself since then).

      Don't feel bad, I don't think many (any?!) programs do this. It's a terrible disservice to academia.

      Examples of programs that do this would be fantastic to have. Or even an Open Education based course that covers some of this would be an awesome thing to see.

    1. Will it also help accomplish another goal — communicating to my students that a classroom of learners is, in my mind, a sort of family?

      I like the broader idea of a classroom itself being a community.

      I do worry that without the appropriate follow up after the fact that this sort of statement, if put on as simple boilerplate, will eventually turn into the corporate message that companies put out about the office and the company being a tight knit family. It's easy to see what a lie this is when the corporation hits hard times and it's first reaction is to fire family members without any care or compassion.

    2. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Remi Kalir</span> in Annotate Your Syllabus 3.0 (<time class='dt-published'>03/13/2021 14:18:33</time>)</cite></small>

      • 0:00 Partie 1 les ingrédients - introduction
      • 4:05 les adultes sont-ils à la hauteur des enjeux ?
      • 4:29 Présentation gégoire BORST
      • 6;34 définition de l'adolescence
      • 9:36 ado jusqu'à 25 ans ?
      • 13:41 quand devient-on adulte ?
      • 15:12 Le monde est il adapté aux ados
      • 16:49 les comportements à risque
      • 18:19 vis-ton l'adolescence de façon différente entre fille et garçon ?
      • 20:16 qui et comment on travaille sur l'adolescence ?
      • 23:52 les différences entre enfants, ados et adultes ?
      • 29:09 Partie 2 : ados et troupeau - prise de risque (l'effet de groupe) exemple sécurité routière
      • 34:19 agir sur le problème via un traitement ou de l'éducation?
      • 39:03 Le conflit et l'adolescent
      • 40:32 conflit entre ados et entre adulte et adolescent est de même nature ? (biais égocentré de l'adulte)
      • 43:22 Des conseils pour se comprendre: Se parler (le rôle de l'éducation nationale)
      • 44:40 les difficultés cognitives des ados (gratification différée en groupe)
      • 49:51 Les signes de la dépression et écran
      • 57:32 Troisième partie: Les ados vont sauver le monde ? la réponse émotionnelle
      • 1:01:32 ados et réseaux sociaux
      • 1:03:47 Utiliser l'effet groupe des ados positivement en éducation
      • 1:06:04 Métacognition et éducation
      • 1:09:16 Le rapport à la croyance
      • 1:11:29 Le jugement violent des adultes sur les adolescents engagés
      • 1:14:37 au delà de l'adolescence, la vraie question est autant de se poser la question de savoir quel est le monde qu'on va laisser pour les enfants de demain mais aussi quels sont les enfants qu'on va-t-on laisser au monde de demain ?
      • 1:16:04 les émotions et la gouvernance et adolescence
      • 1:18:05 Vote démocratique et émotion
      • 1:19:17 Les adulescents
      • 1:21:28 questions salles: est ce qu'on observe une intelligence collective et chez les ados supérieure à celle des adultes notamment lorsqu'il y avait une absence de récompenses
      • 1:22:32 Quelle influence de la composition (genre) du troupeau sur la prise de risque?
      • 1:24:33 L'influence à long terme des systèmes de gratification des réseaux sociaux
      • 1:26:19 Atténuation émotionnelle chez l'ado et résilience ?
      • 1:28:11 la réactance chez les ados
      • 1:30:29 le rapport au mensonge chez l'adolescent
      • 1:35:06 Quelles sont les choses fausses sur les ados ? (sommeil)
      • 1:39:04 Etre ado en 1980et maintenant, c'est différent ? (perturbateurs endocriniens) 2 ans de décalage
      • 1:42:50 l'activation du système de récompense moteur de la société ?
      • 1:45:14 Que faut-il retenir ? (plus confiance, qualité, apprendre à apprendre) bienveillance
      • 1:14:37 au delà de l'adolescence, la vraie question est autant de se poser la question de savoir quel est le monde qu'on va laisser pour les enfants de demain mais aussi quels sont les enfants qu'on va-t-on laisser au monde de demain ?