1,397 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, November 10). Starting soon Day 2 SchBeh Workshop ‘Building an online information environment for policy relevant science’ join for a Q&A with Martha Scherzer (WHO) on role of behavioural scientists in a crisis followed by sessions on ‘Online Discourse’ and ‘Tools’ https://t.co/Gsr66BRGcJ [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1326121764657770496

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, November 9). Second session now underway at the SciBeh workshop: Session 2: Interfacing with Policy How can the wider science community be policy-relevant? Speaking now: Alison Wright from UCL #scibeh2020 https://t.co/Gsr66BRGcJ [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1325750355309830145

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, November 9). Videos and summary docs will be posted online to help those who missed the session get up to speed join us now for hackathon sessions (underway), and tomorrow, Day 2 https://t.co/Gsr66BRGcJ [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1325795290599858178

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, November 5). In 4 days: SciBeh workshop ‘Building an online information environment for policy relevant science’ Join us! Topics: Crisis open science, interfacing to policy, online discourse, tools for research curation talks, panels, hackathons https://t.co/SPeD5BVgj3… I https://t.co/kQClhpHKx5 [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1324286406764744704

    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: ‘Session 1: “Open Science and Crisis Knowledge Management now underway with Chiara Varazzani from the OECD” How can we adapt tools, policies, and strategies for open science to provide what is needed for policy response to COVID-19? #scibeh2020’ / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved 5 March 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1325720293965443072

    1. DataBeers Brussels. (2020, October 26). ⏰ Our next #databeers #brussels is tomorrow night and we’ve got a few tickets left! Don’t miss out on some important and exciting talks from: 👉 @svscarpino 👉 Juami van Gils 👉 Joris Renkens 👉 Milena Čukić 🎟️ Last tickets here https://t.co/2upYACZ3yS https://t.co/jEzLGvoxQe [Tweet]. @DataBeersBru. https://twitter.com/DataBeersBru/status/1320743318234562561

    1. Cailin O’Connor. (2020, November 10). New paper!!! @psmaldino look at what causes the persistence of poor methods in science, even when better methods are available. And we argue that interdisciplinary contact can lead better methods to spread. 1 https://t.co/C5beJA5gMi [Tweet]. @cailinmeister. https://twitter.com/cailinmeister/status/1326221893372833793

    1. ReconfigBehSci {@SciBeh}. {2021-03-04] there will be many a wrong analysis as we cycle through the 1 year anniversary and there is nothing to mark this one out as uniquely bad, but what does seem surprising to me in hindsight is the confidence with which people pronounced given that this was a new disease.[Tweet}, Twitter. Retrieved from: twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1367531205198049285

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, December 8). I’ve been pondering failed predictions today. A spectacular error of mine: In the early media rush to listen to scientists and doctors, I actually thought Western societies might be seeing the end of the “influencer” and a renewed interest in people who did stuff 1/2 [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1336383952232308736

    1. Prof. Devi Sridhar. (2020, March 25). We will be stuck in an endless cycle of lockdown/release for next 18 months, if we do not start mass testing, tracing, & isolating those who are carriers of the virus while pursuing rapid research for antiviral treatment or vaccine. This is the message the public needs to hear. [Tweet]. @devisridhar. https://twitter.com/devisridhar/status/1242743618986745861

    1. I will give a modified version of what health care workers were advised during the worst of the shortages. Rotating a few is enough for disinfection. Just let them rest for a few days in a non-airtight container (like a paper bag or a Tupperware container with holes) and replace one only when it no longer fits well or the elastics have gone soft, or if it is soiled. It’s also good to use hand-sanitizer before putting them on and taking them off. Handle them gently, because a good fit is essential to getting the most out of it. My sense from having heard a lot from people using all the other disinfection methods, like heat, is that they just increase the risk of damaging the mask.

      They've definitely buried the lede here, but this is the answer everyone will be looking for.

    2. Many people have had to turn to social media to wade through all this, and that is quite unfortunate. There is a lot of excellent expertise out there, and one can find someone with the right credential on almost any claim. But experts with seemingly excellent credentials are contradicting one another all the time, as you saw. Plus, not everyone is equally good at communicating. Further, some discussions among experts — the nitty-gritty about some remote possibility that’s potentially concerning but not a big threat now — can frighten people without the background to appreciate the contexts.

      This is a great synopsis of problems in science communication.

    1. SocArXiv. (2020, May 30). You can always see the latest SocArXiv papers on COVID-19 topics here: Https://t.co/pzqftUqY81. You can comment using the @hypothes_is tool, and endorse using the @PlauditPub button. And add your own work, using the covid-19 tag. Https://t.co/owGxoaDfsJ [Tweet]. @socarxiv. https://twitter.com/socarxiv/status/1266796731527806983

    1. Adam Kucharski. (2020, December 13). I’ve turned down a lot of COVID-related interviews/events this year because topic was outside my main expertise and/or I thought there were others who were better placed to comment. Science communication isn’t just about what you take part in – it’s also about what you decline. [Tweet]. @AdamJKucharski. https://twitter.com/AdamJKucharski/status/1338079300097077250

    1. Darren Dahly. (2020, October 28). Every so often I am reminded that there is an entire universe of people just casually giving out gazillions of wrong answers on researchgate like it’s no big deal, and it’s wild. [Tweet]. @statsepi. https://twitter.com/statsepi/status/1321432106824859651

    1. Dominic Minghella. ‘Wow. SAGE Scientist Prof Andrew Hayward on Newsnight Unequivocal: “I Won’t Be Getting My Family Together for Christmas.” Young People and Old People Together a Recipe for Disaster/Snatching Defeat from Jaws of Victory/Wait till Easter and Have a Proper Get-Together. #Newsnight’. Tweet. @DMinghella (blog), 25 November 2020. https://twitter.com/DMinghella/status/1331374249001578497.

  2. Mar 2021
  3. Feb 2021
    1. Ghio, D., Lawes-Wickwar, S., Tang, M. Y., Epton, T., Howlett, N., Jenkinson, E., Stanescu, S., Westbrook, J., Kassianos, A., Watson, D., Sutherland, L., Stanulewicz, N., Guest, E., Scanlan, D., Carr, N., Chater, A., Hotham, S., Thorneloe, R., Armitage, C., … Keyworth, C. (2020). What influences people’s responses to public health messages for managing risks and preventing infectious diseases? A rapid systematic review of the evidence and recommendations [Preprint]. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/nz7tr

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, November 25). @ToddHorowitz3 @sciam do you mean the specific article is bad, or the wider claim/argument? Because as someone who does research on collective intelligence, I’d say there is some reason to believe it is true that there can be “too much” communication in science. See e.g. The work of Kevin Zollman [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1331672900550725634

  4. www.cbc.ca