38 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2020
    1. The Digipo toolkit

      Perhaps I'm missing it, but is this not an open browser extension already? I'd love to have these pieces built as a WordPress or separate plugin. I've seen some of the pieces earlier today that look like they've been unbundled, but I'd love to have the rest...

    2. the event in Miami on Inauguration Day (site:www.sourcewatch.com OR site:www.factcheck.org OR site:hoax-slayer.com OR site:www.truthorfiction.com OR site:opensecrets.org OR site:www.politifact.com OR site:snopes.com OR site:www.washingtonpost.com/news/fact-checker/ OR site:digipo.io)

      just this piece makes this a powerful little tool!

  2. Sep 2020
  3. Aug 2020
    1. por transferir sus plataformas operativas hacia los llamados softwares libres como OpenOffice o el tradicional Linux, las cuales podrían alcanzar efectivamente niveles aceptables de funcionalidad, pero incrementar el riesgo de fallas al carecer éstas de algún tipo de garantía.

      Linux, LibreOffice y en general el software libre y de código abierto sí tiene garantía. De hecho el modelo de negocio del software libre es ofrecer varios servicios, como soporte, capacitación, acompañamiento, etc, en lugar de la venta de licencias.

      Hablar de riesgo incrementado de fallas al caracer de "algún tipo de garantía" es cuando menos ignorante y a lo sumo malintencionado.

      Sobre los servicios de soporte para Linux y Libre Office basta con hacer simples búsquedas en Internet:

      Ambos listados contienen al menos decenas, si no centenares de compañías y profesionales independientes con amplia distribución geográfica.

      Ahora bien, si se refiere a la cláusula "NO WARRANTY" o "AS IS" habitual en todos los productos de software, tanto libres como privativos, que libera a desarrolladores de daños derivados del uso de su software, esta es una cláusula que aparece también en productos de grandes oligopolios digitales (Apple, Microsoft, Google, Amazon). Tanto así que hacer parte de los estándares contractuales.

  4. Jun 2020
  5. May 2020
  6. Apr 2020
  7. Feb 2019
  8. Jan 2018
  9. Jul 2017
    1. The habit is simple. When you feel strong emotion — happiness, anger, pride, vindication — and that emotion pushes you to share a “fact” with others, STOP. Above all, it’s these things that you must fact-check. Why? Because you’re already likely to check things you know are important to get right, and you’re predisposed to analyze things that put you an intellectual frame of mind. But things that make you angry or overjoyed, well… our record as humans are not good with these things. As an example, we might cite this tweet which recently crossed my Twitter feed: You don’t need to know that much of the background here to see the emotionally charged nature of this. President Trump had insulted Chuck Schumer, a Democratic Senator from New York, saying tears that Schumer shed during a statement about refugees were “fake tears”.  This tweet reminds us that that Senator Schumer’s great grandmother died at the hands of the Nazis, which could explain Schumer’s emotional connection to the issue of refugees. Or does it? Do we actually know that Schumer’s great-grandmother died at the hands of the Nazis? And if we are not sure this is true, should we really be retweeting it?

      Example of importance of fact-check. How to spy lies based on a truthful story.

    1. Check for previous work: Look around to see if someone else has already fact-checked the claim or provided a synthesis of research. Go upstream to the source: Go “upstream” to the source of the claim. Most web content is not original. Get to the original source to understand the trustworthiness of the information. Read laterally: Read laterally.[1] Once you get to the source of a claim, read what other people say about the source (publication, author, etc.). The truth is in the network. Circle back: If you get lost, or hit dead ends, or find yourself going down an increasingly confusing rabbit hole, back up and start over knowing what you know now. You’re likely to take a more informed path with different search terms and better decisions.

      Some ideas for checking Facts in the web

  10. Apr 2017
  11. Feb 2017
    1. How to make vetting information easier for readers

      We have a factchecking toolkit currently being used by instructors across the country for just this purpose!

    1. The paper is launching “Decodex”: three fact-checking products powered by a database of 600 websites deemed unreliable as compiled by Le Monde’s fact-checking unit, Les Décodeurs over the last year

      Interesting initiative.

    2. One way of tackling the issue is by using First Draft’s platform called Check, a live, open-source site where organizations can add any disputed content, whether it’s a video, image or fake-news site, and the members will assign a verifiable status.

      Hypothes.is would make a great tool for this effort.

    1. We will continue to work with Tapper and NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations in 2017, which promises to be a busy year as the Republican president and Congress look to make major changes in U.S. policy on climate change, fracking, renewable energy and other issues that SciCheck has been following for over two years.

      Interesting.

  12. Jun 2015