22 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2018
    1. Alan poses a question in his TEDx talk that we should ask students: “Do you know how to use Google?” Of greater importance, the same question should be asked of teachers.

      Video: Alan November TEDx talk "Do you know how to use google?" We need web literacy for teachers as well

    1. The Teaching Tolerance Digital Literacy Framework offers seven key areas in which students need support developing digital and civic literacy skills. The numbered items represent the overarching knowledge and skills that make up the framework. The bullets represent more granular examples of student behaviors to help educators evaluate mastery.

      Digital Literacy Framework of Points

  2. May 2018
  3. Jul 2017
    1. The Internet is this generation’s defining technology for literacy and learning within our global community.2.The Internet and related technologies require new literacies to fully access their potential.

      Completely agree with this statement!

    2. The new literacies of online research and comprehension frames online reading comprehension as a process of problem-based inquiry involving the skills, strategies, dispositions, and social practices that take place as we use the Internet to conduct research, solve problems, and answer ques-tions.

      This is an essential part of PBL, internet research is the essential skill students need to be able to obtain information and analyze their findings.

    3. How can we develop adequate understanding when the very object that we seek to study continuously changes?

      This can be seen as a problem or as an advantage, information is always changing, ideas are been created and developed. Students and teachers do not need to wait for books to print materials to be accessible, is right there.. one click away, now how we find and analyze information on the web is the tool our students need to become web literate .

    4. Consider, for example, just a few of these new technologies: Twitter, Facebook, Google+, Siri, Foursquare, Drop-box, Skype, Chrome, iMovie, Contribute, or any of many, many mobile “apps” and ebooks

      students using this sites need to have web-literacy skills to obtain accurate and relevant information.

    1. It is the responsibility of educators in all grades and content areas to modify as needed for learners.

      Educators guiding these students should have the necessary skills to effectively modify the route of the inquiry. some may argue that pre-k students are too young for this projects, but with the right guidance even little ones can benefit from it.

  4. www.literacyandtechnology.org www.literacyandtechnology.org
    1. TPACK What knowledge do teachers need in order to facilitate student research? Understanding complex relationships among technology, pedagogy, and content with models like the TPACK framework may facilitate teacher growth in new literacies

      TPACK and web-literacy has been proven to help student to deductive evaluate, organize and synthesizing information effectively

    1. when students share what they have learned not only about the information they found, but the sources and strategies they used to uncover that information.

      higher level of thinking! this skills will help students to become leaders rather to recall information. In the end of the day, everyone can search and find imformation at anytime, but can they find the "right" information?

    2. 1

      when directing students to google searchs, is important to guide our students to "get their web literacy hat on" this means to use their reading strategies to ensure the information is valid, important and related to our search.

    1. Wikipedia is broadly misunderstood by faculty and students alike. While Wikipedia must be approached with caution, especially with articles that are covering contentious subjects or evolving events, it is often the best source to get a consensus viewpoint on a subject. Because the Wikipedia community has strict rules about sourcing facts to reliable sources, and because authors must adopt a neutral point of view, articles are often the best available introduction to a subject on the web.

      using Wikipedia as a source of information

    1. The habit is simple. When you feel strong emotion — happiness, anger, pride, vindication — and that emotion pushes you to share a “fact” with others, STOP. Above all, it’s these things that you must fact-check. Why? Because you’re already likely to check things you know are important to get right, and you’re predisposed to analyze things that put you an intellectual frame of mind. But things that make you angry or overjoyed, well… our record as humans are not good with these things. As an example, we might cite this tweet which recently crossed my Twitter feed: You don’t need to know that much of the background here to see the emotionally charged nature of this. President Trump had insulted Chuck Schumer, a Democratic Senator from New York, saying tears that Schumer shed during a statement about refugees were “fake tears”.  This tweet reminds us that that Senator Schumer’s great grandmother died at the hands of the Nazis, which could explain Schumer’s emotional connection to the issue of refugees. Or does it? Do we actually know that Schumer’s great-grandmother died at the hands of the Nazis? And if we are not sure this is true, should we really be retweeting it?

      Example of importance of fact-check. How to spy lies based on a truthful story.

    1. Check for previous work: Look around to see if someone else has already fact-checked the claim or provided a synthesis of research. Go upstream to the source: Go “upstream” to the source of the claim. Most web content is not original. Get to the original source to understand the trustworthiness of the information. Read laterally: Read laterally.[1] Once you get to the source of a claim, read what other people say about the source (publication, author, etc.). The truth is in the network. Circle back: If you get lost, or hit dead ends, or find yourself going down an increasingly confusing rabbit hole, back up and start over knowing what you know now. You’re likely to take a more informed path with different search terms and better decisions.

      Some ideas for checking Facts in the web

    1. When he read the Web address, http://pubweb.northwestern.edu/~abutz/di/intro.html, he assumed that the domain name “northwestern.edu” automatically meant it was a credible source. He did not understand that the “~” character, inserted after the domain name, should be read as a personal Web page and not an official document of the university.

      Even though I consider myself web literate enough to tell the difference between a personal and academic page, I honestly didn't know that the "~" denoted that. I really need to get better about thinking of web addresses and code as a language (which they are).

    1. “The only way to save a democracy is to explain the way things work,” says Linus Neumann, a CCC spokesman and information security consultant. “Understanding things is a good immunization.”

      democracy and web literacy

  5. Apr 2017
    1. Mozilla Web Literacy Map (https://wiki.mozilla.org/Webmaker/WebLiteracyMap).

      Chatting with Mozilla's current person in charge about open practice/pedagogy. We could quote her here

  6. Mar 2017
    1. In 2017 the need to teach fact-checking and source analysis looms larger than ever

      What evidence supports this claim. Are recruiters reporting that college graduates are unable to show proficiency in fact-checking sources or evaluating and verifying information they find on the internet?

  7. Feb 2017