422 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Dwyer, Edward J. “File Card Efficiency.” Journal of Reading 26, no. 2 (1982): 171–171.

      Ease of use in writing and grading with short assignments by using 4 x 6" index cards in classrooms.

      This sounds like some of the articles from 1912 and 1917 about efficiency of card indexes for teaching.

      I'm reminded of some programmed learning texts that were card-based (or really strip-based since they were published in book form) in the 1960s and 1970s. Thse books had small strips with lessons or questions on the front with the answers on the reverse. One would read in strips through the book from front to back and then start the book all over again on page one on the second row of strips and so on.

    1. Rotzel, Grace. “Card File.” The English Journal 6, no. 10 (December 1917): 691–691. https://doi.org/10.2307/801092.

      Follow up note to prior article indicating some sorter term benefits of filing student work and taking notes on it for helping to create improvement over time.

    2. In the February, 1917, number of the English Journal there warticle on "The English Teacher's
    1. Sutherland, Lois Gilbert. “The English Teacher’s Card File.” The English Journal 6, no. 2 (1917): 111–12. https://doi.org/10.2307/801508.


      Lois Gilbert Sutherland suggests using a card index system for multiple uses in the classroom including notes, administration, and general productivity.

      There are so many parallels from this to how people are using platforms like Obsidian, Roam Research, and Notion in 2022.

    2. there might be a miscellaneous division, which wouldserve as a "tickler" and which might even be equipped with a set ofcalendar guides so that the "follow-up" system may be used.

      An example of a ticker file in the vein of getting things done (GTD) documented using index cards and a card file from 1917. Sounds very familiar to the Pile of Index Cards (PoIC) from the early 2000s.

    1. Breitenbach, H. P. “The Card Index for Teachers.” The School Review 20, no. 4 (1912): 271–72.


      Apparently in 1912, the card index was little known to teachers... this isn't the sort of use case I was expecting here...

      The general gist of this short note is an encouraging one to suggest that instead of traditional grade books, which are still used heavily in 2022, teachers should use rolodex like cards for keeping attendance and notes on a student's progress.

      Presumably this never caught on. While some elementary teachers still use older paper gradebooks, many others have transferred to digital LMS platforms.

  2. Sep 2022
    1. Live-Roaming: Using Roam to teach students in college

      I'd listened to this whole episode sometime since 2022-04-05, but didn't put it in my notes.

      Mark Robertson delineates how he actively models the use of his note taking practice (using Roam Research) while teaching/lecturing in the classroom. This sort of modeling can be useful for showing students how academics read, gather, and actively use their knowledge. It does miss the portion about using the knowledge to create papers, articles, books, etc., but the use of this mode of reading and notes within a discussion setting isn't terribly different.

      Use of the system for conversation/discussion with the authors of various texts as you read, with your (past) self as you consult your own notes, or your students in classroom lectures/discussion sections is close to creating your own discussion for new audiences (by way of the work your write yourself.)

      https://www.buzzsprout.com/1194506/4875515-mark-robertson-history-socratic-dialogue-live-roaming.mp3

  3. Aug 2022
    1. And if you still need a why–I’ll let this quote from Seneca answer it (which I got from my own reading and notes): “We should hunt out the helpful pieces of teaching and the spirited and noble-minded sayings which are capable of immediate practical application–not far far-fetched or archaic expressions or extravagant metaphors and figures of speech–and learn them so well that words become works.”
  4. Jul 2022
    1. 1. Focus on items that occur with high frequency in the language as awhole (see Table 3.1 for examples). Such items will occur often inmany different texts.2. Focus on strategies that can be used with most texts (see Table 3.1for examples).

      .c1

    2. Here are the rules associated with the free and checked vowels. Theserules apply only to stressed syllables.

      .c1

    1. People who write extensively about note-writing rarely have a serious context of use https://notes.andymatuschak.org/zUMFE66dxeweppDvgbNAb5hukXzXQu8ErVNv

      This idea can be extrapolated to a much larger set of practitioners. It could be termed "the curse of the influencer".

      link to: - aphorism: "Those who can't do, teach", from the original line ‘Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach’ in George Bernard Shaw’s 1905 stage play Man and Superman.

    1. In design terms, this begins with the learning experience (LX) of students — but often extends toward the teaching experience (TX), and even the user experience of technologists, instructional designers and administrators. Collectively, I call these the "pedagogical experience" (PX) of an e-learning tool.

      Designing pedagogical experience (PX) encompasses both the learning experience (LX) of the students as well as the teaching experience (TX) of the instructor.

      Educational technology should take both parts of the overall experience into account. Too many focus on one side or the other: the ease of use for the teacher at the expense of the student or the ease of use for the student at the expense of the teacher. Balancing the two can be difficult, but designers should be watching both.

    1. One of the risks I heard mentioned is that of becoming/ being perceived as an ”arm of the university bureaucracy”, as CTLs become more involved in decision-making on educational issues.

      Interesting problem. Why is the CTL not seen as an "arm of shared governance" in these cases? Or at least a venue of it?

    2. Dilemma: should/ can the CTL be neutral territory (and can it be?)

      Fascinating to see what "neutral" means here. There's the "non-evaluative"/"non-supervisory" sense, where "neutrality" is essentially with respect to office politics, and the "not advancing an argument" sense, which in the strictest sense seems almost impossible to reconcile with any kind of developmental work.

  5. Jun 2022
    1. https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/learning-innovation/why-%E2%80%98how-humans-learn%E2%80%99-book-i%E2%80%99ve-been-waiting

      How Humans Learn: The Science and Stories Behind Effective College Teaching by Joshua R. Eyler #books/wanttoread<br /> Published in March 2018

      Mentioned at the [[Hypothesis Social Learning Summit - Spotlight on Social Reading & Social Annotation]] in the chat in the [[Social Annotation Showcase]]

    2. For college professors, I think the critical contribution of How Humans Learn is that good teaching is constructed, not ordained.

      "...good teaching is constructed, not ordained."

    1. Research is messy and full of failed attempts. Trying to protect students from that reality does them a disservice.

      Yup. This is basically a version of "don't coddle your students".

  6. May 2022
    1. What's the Best Way to Teach Science?

      0:31 What's the best way to teach science in my opinion? It's to do science. And to summarize my motto it's this: Don't Kill the Wonder! (and don't hide the practices)

      0:42 The wonder is a look that you see on a person's face when they're REALLY interested in a problem but they don't know the answer.

      1:13 And so the WORST way to teach science is to start by explaining! You want them to have that curiosity and then follow that curiosity.

      3:16 When you're teaching science it's not the content ... what is the most important thing. It's the actual practices of doing science.

      3:41 ...We live in an ironic time. At a time where people are so excited about science and new discoveries but students are not excited about their classroom. And I think one of the reasons why, is that what we do, is we tend to just explain all the time. When you explain all the time what you lose is the Wonder. —

      https://youtu.be/TzoIz2W-gLQ

  7. Apr 2022
    1. Trisha Greenhalgh #IStandWithUkraine 🇺🇦 [@trishgreenhalgh]. (2021, September 26). Big Thread coming on ‘returning to on-site teaching’. Intended mainly for universities (because I work in one), but may also be useful for schools. Mute thread if not interested. I’ll base it around real questions I’ve been asked. 1/ [Tweet]. Twitter. https://twitter.com/trishgreenhalgh/status/1442162256779821060

    1. Much of Barthes’ intellectual and pedagogical work was producedusing his cards, not just his published texts. For example, Barthes’Collège de France seminar on the topic of the Neutral, thepenultimate course he would take prior to his death, consisted offour bundles of about 800 cards on which was recorded everythingfrom ‘bibliographic indications, some summaries, notes, andprojects on abandoned figures’ (Clerc, 2005: xxi-xxii).

      In addition to using his card index for producing his published works, Barthes also used his note taking system for teaching as well. His final course on the topic of the Neutral, which he taught as a seminar at Collège de France, was contained in four bundles consisting of 800 cards which contained everything from notes, summaries, figures, and bibliographic entries.


      Given this and the easy portability of index cards, should we instead of recommending notebooks, laptops, or systems like Cornell notes, recommend students take notes directly on their note cards and revise them from there? The physicality of the medium may also have other benefits in terms of touch, smell, use of colors on them, etc. for memory and easy regular use. They could also be used physically for spaced repetition relatively quickly.

      Teachers using their index cards of notes physically in class or in discussions has the benefit of modeling the sort of note taking behaviors we might ask of our students. Imagine a classroom that has access to a teacher's public notes (electronic perhaps) which could be searched and cross linked by the students in real-time. This would also allow students to go beyond the immediate topic at hand, but see how that topic may dovetail with the teachers' other research work and interests. This also gives greater meaning to introductory coursework to allow students to see how it underpins other related and advanced intellectual endeavors and invites the student into those spaces as well. This sort of practice could bring to bear the full weight of the literacy space which we center in Western culture, for compare this with the primarily oral interactions that most teachers have with students. It's only in a small subset of suggested or required readings that students can use for leveraging the knowledge of their teachers while all the remainder of the interactions focus on conversation with the instructor and questions that they might put to them. With access to a teacher's card index, they would have so much more as they might also query that separately without making demands of time and attention to their professors. Even if answers aren't immediately forthcoming from the file, then there might at least be bibliographic entries that could be useful.

      I recently had the experience of asking a colleague for some basic references about the history and culture of the ancient Near East. Knowing that he had some significant expertise in the space, it would have been easier to query his proverbial card index for the lived experience and references than to bother him with the burden of doing work to pull them up.

      What sorts of digital systems could help to center these practices? Hypothes.is quickly comes to mind, though many teachers and even students will prefer to keep their notes private and not public where they're searchable.

      Another potential pathway here are systems like FedWiki or anagora.org which provide shared and interlinked note spaces. Have any educators attempted to use these for coursework? The closest I've seen recently are public groups using shared Roam Research or Obsidian-based collections for book clubs.

  8. Mar 2022
    1. Research suggeststhat making these motions will improve our own performance: people who

      gesture as they teach on video, it’s been found, speak more fluently and articulately, make fewer mistakes, and present information in a more logical and intelligible fashion.

      Teachers who gesture as they teach have been found to make fewer mistakes, speak more fluently/articulately, and present their lessons in a more intelligible and logical manner.

  9. Feb 2022
    1. Read for Understanding

      Ahrens goes through a variety of research on teaching and learning as they relate to active reading, escaping cognitive biases, creating understanding, progressive summarization, elaboration, revision, etc. as a means of showing and summarizing how these all dovetail nicely into a fruitful long term practice of using a slip box as a note taking method. This makes the zettelkasten not only a great conversation partner but an active teaching and learning partner as well. (Though he doesn't mention the first part in this chapter or make this last part explicit.)

    2. While it is obvious that familiarity is not understanding, we have nochance of knowing whether we understand something or just believewe understand something until we test ourselves in some form.

      The Cornell notes practice of writing questions in the empty left column as a means of testing knowledge can be an effective tool after taking notes to ensure that one has actually learned and understood the broad concepts. They can also be used for spaced repetition purposes as well.

      Valuable though they may be as teaching and learning tools, they don't figure directly into the idea of permanent notes from a zettelkasten perspective.

    3. Hubert and Stuart Dreyfus, researchers on expertise, have asimple explanation: Teachers tend to mistake the ability to follow(their) rules with the ability to make the right choices in realsituations.

      Expertise isn't just the ability to know the rules and practice them properly, but to know when to break or bend them as present circumstances might require.

    4. the accidental encounters make up the majority of what welearn.

      Serendipity is a valuable teacher.

  10. Jan 2022
    1. It’s a lot more work to give people an interesting puzzle to solve, support them with high expectations all the way through them doing something genuinely compelling and interesting with the synthesis (and they know when you’re just BSing them), and hold them to high standards while also modeling the appropriate behaviors yourself. It’s almost impossible with class sizes upwards of 40 and class periods of 40 minutes and most of the system isn’t actually optimized for achieving that anyway
    2. https://eleanorkonik.com/the-difficulties-of-teaching-notetaking/

      A fascinating take on why we don't teach study skills and note taking the way they had traditionally been done in the past. What we're teaching and teaching toward has changed dramatically.

    1. Depuis longtemps, je suis d’avis que la rigueur d’un cours ne se mesure pas à la quantité de connaissances dont l’enseignant fait étalage, mais aux apprentissages que les étudiants font.

      Which can lead to an assessment of pedagogical efficacy. It's funny, to me, that those who complain about "grade inflation" (typically admins) rarely entertain the notion that grades could be higher than usual if the course went well. The situation is quite different in "L&D" (Learning and Development, typically for training and professional development in an organizational context). "Oh, great! We were able to get everyone to reach the standard for this competency! Must mean that we've done something right in our Instructional Design!"

    1. My plan is to turn Write of Passage into an independent publishing company, which will become the main growth channel for Write of Passage.

      This is a tremendous opportunity for people to leave academia. Imagine being a technical writer, business writer, poet, or creative writer. This could be a good networking opportunity.

  11. Dec 2021
    1. How do I allow students to voice contentious, ugly, or even ignorant views, so that they can learn without fear of recrimination?

      Too broad of a spectrum here. And why should students not fear recrimination? This is coddling, pure and simple.

    2. first-day surveys, name tents, and very brief in-class writing about students’ values or daily lives help students experience a sense of belonging.

      Now imagine it from the students' POV, students who are taken 4 or more courses, and having to do the same engagement exercises over and over again in all their classes.

      I think it would drive them in the opposite direction from that intended by the instructor.

    1. Lack of perceived benefit or need.

      Had a patron get mad with me because I told them I discover new music through YouTube and other social media. He was one that asked me about it, in the first the place.

    2. Negative feelings about social media.

      Not true when people such as Lynn “Lynja” Davis from Cooking with Lynja, is one the most popular cooks on TikTok when is 77 and retired. She literally has more followers than everyone I know personally combined.

      Side note Dan Povenmire is the creator of Phineas and Ferb maybe only 58, but he is literally one the best thing on TikTok other than Lynja of course

    3. Had a patron get mad with me because I told them I discover new music through YouTube and other social media. He was one that asked me about it, in the first the place.

    1. In this study, we drew on sociocultural notions of agency – where individual actions are entwined with community goals. A community is comprised of people with shared and individual goals, in their environments, in the midst of a historical context (Wenger 1998Wenger, E. 1998. Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]). Due to this web of relationships with people, environment, and history, people do not act autonomously, but according to possibilities within the community. Such possibilities for agency are negotiated over time; actions that strengthen ties to the community constitute investments in the self that in turn, have outcomes for the community as well (Peirce 1995Peirce, B. N. 1995. “Social Identity, Investment, and Language Learning.” TESOL Quarterly 29: 9–31. doi:10.2307/3587803. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]). The financial metaphor in using the word investment is critical – it connotes spent effort that yields dividends. These dividends emerge immediately and over time.

      This helps me consider communities of practice, and unpacking the relational aspects - agency within a context, not autonomous, informed by the context and others. Is there a tension with "groupthink", how to value the diversity in a group, and build stronger not weaker, not defaulting or regressing to a mean?. How do we build a group to be more than the sum of the parts. how does the community work to enhance practice.

  12. Nov 2021
    1. TALIS(Teaching and Learning International Survey)

      TALIS

      (Teaching and Learning International Survey)

    2. Remote and distance teaching will become increasingly
    3. upper secondaryschool teachers' experiences of Emergency Distance Teaching

      The purpose of this study was to explore the Swedish upper secondary school teachers' experiences of Emergency Distance Teaching during the first year of the Covid-19 pandemic. Three research questions were considered sufficient to answer this aim.

    4. organization and experiences of teaching and learningduring this time are described based on representative surveys conducted during andafter the spring 2020 distance teaching period.

      organization and experiences of teaching and learning during this time are described based on representative surveys conducted during and after the spring 2020 distance teaching period.

  13. Sep 2021
  14. Aug 2021
  15. Jul 2021
    1. This distinction is familiar in terms of the differences be­tween being able to remember something and being able to explain it.

      This quote is similar and generally related to the Feynman Technique. (see: https://fs.blog/2021/02/feynman-learning-technique/) It's based apparently on quotes attributed to Feynman which include:

      • "I couldn't reduce it to the freshman level. That means we really don't understand it."
      • "If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't really understand it."
    1. This is one of the more-satisfying ruby expressions I've seen in a long time. I can't say that it also has prosaic transparency, but I think seeing it teaches important things.
  16. Jun 2021
    1. "Music education students enter universities from diverse backgrounds that include musical experiences in “subaltern” musical practices (rock bands, music theatre, hip hop, and other genres). After four years or so in the institutional environment, we send them out to the world somehow convinced that what they ought to be teaching is the Western canon."

  17. May 2021
    1. Some people, regardless of their experience level are horrible as teachers. A school teacher gets asked the same question every year. Every year they answer them, even if it seems redundant, and the answers are simple to THEM. Teaching requires patience and the acceptance of being asked "dumb questions" repeatedly. If they cannot handle that, then they should simply not teach or pretend to be a teacher.
    1. The expansion increased the capacity of the center to offer individualized consultations with faculty who were new to online teaching.

      What options do we have as we won't be adding additional staff?

    1. Perhaps for everyone, a moment or occasion of leadership will emerge, reveal itself, and call to us with the painful, necessary task of speaking up, patiently asking for alternatives, insistently rocking the boat

      Leaders - and teachers - must recognise those moments when we're called to do something courageous.

      And we must find or create opportunities for our students to do the same.

    2. Ivan Illich, no fan of schooling or authoritarian structures of any kind, writes movingly about the role of the true, deep teacher. So does George Steiner, using language of “master” and “disciple” that would make many open-web folks cringe–or worse. Yet even the great and greatly democratic poet Walt Whitman salutes his “eleves” at one point. And I have experienced and been very grateful for the wisdom of those teacher-leaders who brought me into a fuller experience and understanding of my own responsibilities as a leader.
    3. leading is risky business

      As is teaching.

    1. flexible grading policies

      I'm especially attracted to the #ungrading work I've been watching from folks like Mary Klann and David Buck...and I know there are so many more people working with authentic and alternative assessment practices...

    2. We as parents will always give more to our kids than they will give us,

      This is likely true: parents give to their kids in ways we ourselves probably can't remember or truly know. Lately, however — and maybe this is because my kids have reached a certain age — I feel like I've been getting more from my kids than I'm giving, both in care and intellectually.

      I wonder how I might teach differently if my expectation were always that I would be getting more from my students than they might get from me?

    3. Twitter group DMs with international friends

      For me too such international group conversations have been immensely sustaining during the pandemic, and a deep source of learning and laughter. Many of us don't even really know each other that well and have not ever met in person, but our guards are down, our empathy is up, and almost any topic elicits some thoughtful response, or at least acknowledgement.

    4. Can you think of others?

      In the USA especially, I feel like teachers would benefit from much more care from society in general and government at all levels. In the USA, we pay lip service to the sacrifice and nobility of teachers, but also under-fund and under-value teaching and education generally.

  18. Apr 2021
    1. This new meeting control is ideal for teachers, and it should definitely help them penalize students who are consistently late for their online classes.

      This is really terrible framing for this issue. We should not be promoting a penal culture for education.

  19. Mar 2021
    1. I hadn't really thought that much about the pedagogical aspects (they don't really teach PhD historians pedagogy where I went to school, or I missed it somehow, so I've been trying to educate myself since then).

      Don't feel bad, I don't think many (any?!) programs do this. It's a terrible disservice to academia.

      Examples of programs that do this would be fantastic to have. Or even an Open Education based course that covers some of this would be an awesome thing to see.

  20. Feb 2021
  21. Jan 2021
    1. Unpacking “Active Learning”: A Combination of Flipped Classroom and Collaboration Support Is More Effective but Collaboration Support Alone Is Not

      The results show the importance of flipped classrooms in addition to collaborative support in active learning, emphasis on the importance of supporting educators in learning these new methods and how student attitudes relate to learning outcomes

    1. How flip teaching supports undergraduate chemistry laboratory learning

      Design and application of a flipped classroom in gen chem labs, uses handwritten annotations to support student learning but shows evidence of improving engagement and critical thinking

  22. Dec 2020
    1. To take one example, I regularly practice philosophy in K-12 schools, working with teachers and students to implement philosophy discussions, activities, and lessons in classrooms

      Basically, the guy wants to teach kids but also be a professional academic researcher. While it's probably true that teaching kids philosophy is a good thing, I don't know why that has to be considered an academic practice. Maybe he should just start his own nonprofit for that stuff?

  23. Oct 2020
    1. o visualize the data in UCSC genome browser, clic

      Provide trainees with a long period here to look at ucsc and play with it (time permitting)

    2. Recovering exon info

      So we have the original exon list, and we have a list of exon IDs, and the exon IDs on their own aren't very useful, so, let's find the exons in the original file which match these exon IDs

    3. ount the number

      Q: Ok, given last file, how would we figure this out? anyone know it in excel?

    4. fall into that exon?

      Again, numbers may be diff, compare with students

    5. Find exons with the most SNPs

      Q: What datasets do you have? How would you could about figuring this out? what information would you use?

    6. Again open the UCSC Main - table brows

      go back and do it again! It's the same thing over again

    7. When the dataset is green

      I usually just open the dataset and discuss what an exon is (genomic region w/ annotation.)

    8. Now set the following parameters:

      i'll read the parameters, but, they can check against the tutorial to be sure they're doing the right variables.

    9. Rename your history

      This is such an important step! So easy for students to get lost in their histories, remind them that it's normal, it happens to us, and life will be so much easier if they name things well.

    10. Browse to your favourite

      everyone should be logged into usegalaxy.eu by now

    11. Background

      Users can read if they like, but, not very important. Some people just really want to know the science, even though it's not relevant to what you're doing, which is learning how to manipulate the galaxy ui

    12. We start with the question: In human chromosome 22, which exon has the highest number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)?

      Important to note for students, that they understand this central question

    1. And though flags from this software don’t automatically mean students will be penalized—instructors can review the software’s suspicions and decide for themselves how to proceed—it leaves open the possibility that instructors’ own biases will determine whether to bring academic dishonesty charges against students. Even just an accusation could negatively affect a student’s academic record, or at the very least how their instructor perceives them and their subsequent work.

      The companies are hiding behind this as a feature - that the algorithms are not supposed to be implemented without human review. I wonder how this "feature" will interact with implicit (and explicit) biases, or with the power dynamics between adjuncts, students, and departmental administration.

      The companies are caught between a rock and a hard place in the decision whether students should be informed that their attempt was flagged for review, or not. We see that, if the student is informed, it causes stress and pain and damage to the teacher-student relationship. But if they're not informed, all these issues of bias and power become invisible.

    1. Social Media and Networking Technologies: An Analysis of Collaborative Work and Team Communication

      Trends in Web 2.0 technologies and various networking modalities are briefly reviewed. Furthermore, advantages and barriers in the use of said technologies are discussed. Implementation of social media as a learning tool can be advantageous, however, it must supplement learning, not replace a structured environment. The educator should still remain present in the learning environment. And, he/she should provide appropriate support and training, as well as model, respective online tools to ensure efficacy. 6/10

  24. ecourse.auca.kg ecourse.auca.kg
    1. See the sun gods, gods of light,howling storm gods, twin gods of dawn,and gods of wind, Arjuna,wondrous forms not seen before

      In this part of statement, it shows that Indian people believe in different gods.

    2. I am the self abidingin the heart of all creatures;I am their beginning,their middle, and their end.

      Lord Krishna mentioned his power to the world that his power is endless.

    3. Men who worship me,thinking solely of me,always disciplined,win the reward I secure.

      it state in this part that the man who worship me and think about me will be reward at the end by lord.

    4. I am the universal father,mother, granter of all, grandfather,object of knowledge, purifier,holy syllable OM, threefold sacred lore.

      Does Krishna showing his power to the world by calling himself as a universal father?

    5. He who sees me everywhereand sees everything in mewill not be lost to me,and I will not be lost to him

      Is it explaining the relationship between lord Krishna and Arjuna?

    6. A man of discipline should alwaysdiscipline himself, remain in seclusion,isolated, his thought and self well controlled,without possessions or hope.

      A man of discipline is the one who should control his senses, and he should be discipline by himself.

    7. This is the ancient disciplinethat I have taught to you today;you are my devotee and my friend,and this is the deepest mystery

      This is a mystery from past that Krishna thought to his friend. the question is does anyone else able to be discipline or not?

    8. Whatever a leader does,the ordinary people also do.He sets the standardfor the world to follow.

      It show the actions and commitment of leaders for their follower. because whatever a leader says, his/her speech must be as rule for his/her followers.

    9. Creatures depend on food,food comes from rain,rain depends on sacrifice,and sacrifice comes from action.

      How this chains of event can be related to the action of human being?

    10. Disciplined by understanding,one abandons both good and evil deeds;so arm yourself for discipline—discipline is skill in actions.

      It is not enough by only understanding the discipline, because discipline is skill that should be show by actions.

    11. The man of discipline has joy,delight, and light within;becoming the infinite spirit,he finds the pure calm of infinity.

      Here Lord Krishna shows that a person with discipline is always happy, has a good life, and always be satisfied with his/her life also I think that person will be positive energy for others.

    12. People will tellof your undying shame,and for a man of honorshame is worse than death

      In this statement Krishna explaining the honor of participation in the battle than death, because if Arjuna do not participate in the battle then it will be a big shame for the rest of his life.

    13. Death is certain for anyone born,and birth is certain for the dead;

      In my view Indian people believes to the life after death, but what it means the adjective of certain for birth and death?

    14. decisively—Which is better?I am your pupil.Teach me what I seek!

      Arjuna is kinda confused with Krishna's speech. although Arjuna is not agree with Krishna in some parts, but still why he keep asking for his guide?

    15. Krishna, how can I fightagainst Bhishma and Dronawith arrowswhen they deserve my worship?

      Krishna believe that fighting against Bhishma and Drono is a big sin for him. because they do not deserve to be killed instead they deserve to worship.

    16. Krishna,women of the family are corrupted;and when women are corrupted,disorder is born in society.

      If women corrupted the corruption will grow in society, because women shape the half of society, beside they playing an important role in families. so it shows that when a women corrupted then his son can also follow his path.

    17. I do not want to kill themeven if I am killed, Krishna;not for kingship of all three worlds,much less for the earth

      what does Krishna meant by three world? is it the three world that they believe to the life after death?

    18. Sacrifice in knowledge is betterthan sacrifice with material objects;the totality of all actionculminates in knowledge, Arjuna,

      What does Krishna mean by scarifies? is it something like sharing knowledge?

    19. They are teachers, fathers, sons,and grandfathers, uncles, grandsons,fathers and brothers of wives,and other men of our family.

      Arjuna stated that there are all my kinsman such as: teachers, fathers, sons i do not want to go the battle and kill them. is Krishna meant only his kinsman the reason to not fight or he was not able to do it?

    20. Krishna, I seek no victory,or kingship or pleasures.What use to us are kingship,delights, or life itsel

      Krishna state that if i want kingship, it is not because of victory or pleasure. then what Krishna meant by delight and life itself in the statement?

    21. success comes quickly from action

      It describes that just talking about something is not enough, we have to show it by action then by the time passed action will change to success.

    22. My limbs sink,mymouth is parched,mybody trembles,the hair bristles on my flesh.

      Arjuna stated in this part to Krishna about his weakness that he is able to fight, he do not have power to fight in the battle.

    1. Online learning, blended learning, flipped learning, hybrid learning, flexible learning, open learning and distance education are all terms that are often used inter-changeably, but there are significant differences in meaning. More importantly, these forms of education, once considered somewhat esoteric and out of the mainstream of conventional education, are increasingly taking on greater significance and in some cases becoming mainstream themselves. As teachers and instructors become more familiar and confident with online learning and new technologies, there will be more innovative methods developing all the time.

      The author, Anthony Bates, holds a BA in Psychology and a Ph.D. in Educational Administration. He holds over 40 years of teaching experience. In this chapter he proposes online learning is a mode of delivery versus a teaching method. In this chapter Bates compares teaching delivery methods, defines which mode students need, and weighs in on the choice between face-to-face and online teaching.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. An Evaluation of Problem-based Learning Supported by Information and Communication Technology: A Pilot Study

      (Under "Viewing Options", select PDF.) In this article, Ernawaty and Sujono (2019) summarize results of a study funded by the Research and Higher Education Directorate of Indonesia. The study aimed to evaluate the cogency of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in problem based learning (PBL) and traditional teaching methods (TTM) based upon learner test scores. The concepts of PBL, TTM, and implications of ICTs are briefly reviewed. Results of the study revealed that PBL with the support of an ICT yielded the highest test scores. (6/10)

    1. teachers hid their Facebook accounts for fear of being fired.

      The sound of this to me know reminds me of the type of suppression of thought that might have occurred in the middle ages.

      Of course open thought and discussion is important for teachers the same way it is for every other person. However there are a few potential counterexamples where open discussion of truly abhorrent ideas can run afoul of community mores.

      Case in point:


      [also on boffosocko.com]

    1. When I received Chris’s comment, my first response was that I should delete my post or at least the incorrect part of it. It’s embarrassing to have your incorrect understandings available for public view. But I decided to leave the post as is but put in a disclaimer so that others would not be misled by my misunderstandings. This experience reminded me that learning makes us vulnerable. Admitting that you don’t know something is hard and being corrected is even harder. Chris was incredibly gentle in his correction. It makes me think about how I respond to my students’ work. Am I as gentle with their work as Chris was to mine? Could I be more gentle? How often have I graded my students’ work and only focused on what they did wrong? Or forgotten that feeling of vulnerability when you don’t know something, when you put your work out for others to judge? This experience has also reminded me that it’s important that we as teachers regularly put ourselves into situations in which we authentically grapple with not knowing something. We should regularly share our less than fully formed understandings with others for feedback. It helps us remember that even confident learners can struggle with being vulnerable. And we need to keep in mind that many of our students are not confident learners.

      I'm reminded here of the broad idea that many bloggers write about sooner or later of their website being a "thought space" or place to contemplate out in the open. More often than not, even if they don't have an audience to interact with, their writings become a way of thinking out loud, clarifying things for themselves, self-evolving, or putting themselves out there for potential public reactions (good, bad, or indifferent).

      While writing things out loud to no audience can be helpful and useful on an individual level, it's often even more helpful to have some sort of productive and constructive feedback. While a handful of likes or positive seeming responses can be useful, I always prefer the ones that make me think more broadly, deeply, or force me to consider other pieces I hadn't envisioned before. To me this is the real value of these open and often very public thought spaces.

      For those interested in the general idea, I've been bookmarking/tagging things around the idea of thought spaces I've read on my own website. Hopefully this collection helps others better understand the spectrum of these ideas for themselves.

      With respect to the vulnerability piece, I'm reminded of an episode of <cite>The Human Current</cite> I listened to a few weeks back. There was an excellent section that touched on building up trust with students or even a class when it comes to providing feedback and criticism. Having a bank of trust makes it easier to give feedback as well as to receive it. Here's a link to the audio portion and a copy of the relevant text.

    1. Strategies for Virtual Learning Environments:Focusing on Teaching Presence and TeachingImmediacy

      Through a literature review of 50 articles published between 2003-2014, the authors explored aspects of online learning (teacher presence, teacher immediacy) that impact learner interest and motivation in the online environment. Recognizing that these aspects are key, the authors explore various approaches to retention the virtual setting. The multifaceted role of the instructor is reviewed as well as virtual facilitation strategies. The literature search revealed a positive correlation between teaching presence, teaching immediacy, and learner engagement and motivation. 6/10

  25. Sep 2020
    1. This is a great page for teaching hoe to evaluate Wikipedia pages.

  26. Aug 2020
    1. We do not consider that a separation exists between the consciousness-raising efforts of the distortion which you project as a personality and the distortion which you project as an other-personality. Thus, to learn is the same as to teach unless you are not teaching what you are learning, in which case you have done you/they little or no good. This understanding should be pondered by your mind/body/spirit complex, as it is a distortion which plays a part in your experiences at this nexus
    1. *Game star mechanic

      • Creativity is expressed via making video games online
      • problem solving skills increase
      • comments-feedback
      • constructive criticism needed
      • teachers need to be constructive in terms of feedback How does this change as school has become more online?
    1. I like how the technology and collaborative aspects are being used to relate the issue of homelessness not only to the past events but also the issues facing their community on both a local and personal level.

    1. Learners are encouraged to be creative as they build and revise content. They should look to see if it meets their needs and how representative it is to other elements of online information. But, most importantly, they are to use the expertise of other students and the teacher in the classroom. I would also suggest including elements of abstracted replay, or viewing the work of experts as they revise and edit their own work process and produ

      Work collaboratively and smart not hard

    2. Construction is equal parts inspiration and perspiration. Construction calls on creativity as well as persistence, flexibility, and revision. Construction asks our students and teachers to focus on the power and patience employed during work process…and not just the final resultant work product

      Nothing is ever finished on the internet

    3. our understanding of construction and creation needs to be broad enough to allow for change in the future.

      the internet is constantly changing everyday as more information is uploaded daily. Nothing is ever finished being constructed

    4. The ideas and concepts in all of this work does overlap sometimes…and students and teachers should feel empowered to move in, out, and between all of the concepts. Working online is a fluid experience which calls for flexible learners.

      This is very true as flexibility is needed in the classroom.

    5. . In order to fill the void I would see concerning the creativity, composition, and design skills students need…we have been developing online content construction (OCC)

      This is especially important as technology integration in the classroom has become critical under our current situation.