208 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. interesting story about how this guy, who did play football professionally, would like math teachers to take a few points from football coaches.

      good for the overall sentiment and the individual interest & inspiration

  2. Apr 2019
    1. We expect authentic writing from our students, yet we do not write authentic assignments for them.

      I'd like to understand this better. How much choice is required for an assignment to be "meaningful" or "authentic". I can't recall a single writing assignment when I didn't have some freedom to choose a topic (within the bounds of the class) - though there were certainly lots of formal constraints in the way I wrote.

    1. Hi I'm and Oberman and I'm from much Paladin State University of Denver and I'm using hypothesis currently in a course and so I teach social work.

      Ann starts speaking here about her experience teach with Hypothesis in the classroom. Close this sidebar and click on the text to advance the video to this point (53:29). Ann speaks for about 4 minutes. Worth watching till the end.

    1. This article is a breakdown from the U.S. Department of Education around the types of learning environments that exist in the technology arena. It provides examples of schools fulfilling these different environments and offers a collection fo additional resources.

      Rating: 9/10

  3. Mar 2019
    1. Behaviorism

      Learning-Theories.com published a very handy few pages that describe various learning theories. This is a quick, straightforward, simple way to access information on the different theories. This article, Behaviorism, explains that the theory assumes learners learn by responding to external stimuli in their environment. Learning under behaviorism is characterized by a change in the learner's behavior. I use this in my horse training as I use both positive reinforcement (clicker training) and negative reinforcement (pressure-release) to structure my horse's behaviors. Behaviorism can be translated to human work, too. I've used TAG teaching (clicker training for humans) to teach people to get on and off horses with ease and also to trim horses' hooves. I also use it to clicker train my cats! 6/10

    1. Overview of Learning Theories

      The Berkeley Graduate Division published an interesting and straightforward table of learning theories. The table compares behaviorism, cognitive constructivism, and social constructivism in four ways: the view of knowledge, view of learning, view of motivation, and implications for teaching. This is an easy-to-read, quick resource for those who would like a side-by-side comparison of common theories. 9/10

    1. 25 examples of mobile teaching This is a brief page that is cluttered with some irrelevant content that occurs in the form of rather large graphics. It is oriented toward higher education environments though the ideas would be quite easy to implement in other contexts, such as for training adult learners. The text is not in depth enough to be tremendously helpful but this resource does nonetheless make a contribution not made by other resources in that it shows actual teaching techniques. rating 4/5

    1. personalize learning infographic

      This is not quite what it sounds like. It is a Pinterest style page with links to assorted articles that relate to personalized learning, most of which are presented in an infographic. It is sufficiently useful if one has the patience to click through to the infographics. Usability is satisfactory although the top half of the page is taken up with graphics that are not directly related to the content. rating 3/5

    1. just in time teaching This article provides practice strategies by which one can use just in time teaching. This was authored for use in higher education environments but can easily be used in other settings. It appears to have practical use. rating 5/5

    1. mobile learning technologies for 21st century classrooms This undated article discusses mobile learning in classrooms in a nonspecific way. One of the sources is Marc Prensky, whose work has been called into question by multiple authors. The type of information provided by this article seems rather basic and a function of common sense. A few apps are discussed. rating 1/5

    1. Edutech wiki This page has a somewhat messy design and does not look very modern but it does offer overviews of many topics related to technologies. Just like wikipedia, it offers a good jumping off point on many topics. Navigation can occur by clicking through categories and drilling down to topics, which is easier for those who already know the topic they are looking for and how it is likely to be characterized. Rating 3/5

    1. This page offers general guidelines for facilitating class discussions. It is written for college environments and in usable in adult learning and training settings also. The presentation is straightforward but the content is not in depth. Part of the value of the page is links on the left side that address other teaching topics related to course design and course management. Rating 2/2

    1. teachthought This particular page is entitled '20 simple assessment strategies you can use every day' but the reason it is listed here is because the page itself serves as a jumping off point for reviewing or learning about many educational theories and principles. This site may have been designed for K-12 teachers - I am not sure, but it is quite usable for those who teach adults. This is a place to come if you are interested in browsing - not if you have a specific thing you need at the moment. Rating 3/5

  4. www.pblworks.org www.pblworks.org
    1. project based learning While project based learning is more frequently used with children than adults, it can be useful for limited-time instruction for adults. This is a user friendly page that provides a decent description of project based learning and also discusses the design elements and teaching practices that should be used. rating 4/5

    1. problem based learning This gives a brief overview of problem based learning. This is a teaching method in which learners receive an ill structured problem that they continue to define and then solve. This web page serves as an overview but if one were teaching with this approach, more information would be needed than is contained on the typical introductory web page. Rating 3/5

    1. This is better than the problem-based learning page I already posted so I will post this one too. it is easy to read and gives the instructional designer or teacher a quick and better-than-average explanation about problem based learning, which is a method of teaching in which learners form teams and learn through solving real problems. rating 4/5

    1. Nine alternatives to lecturing This page briefly describes nine ways to teach other than lecture. Some of these are common, such as case study; others, such as a pro and con grid, are explained less often. This page, like the others I have bookmarked, is oriented toward teaching college students and adults.

    1. This is one of many pages that describes team based learning. The layout and typeface make this page easy enough to read. The content is rather brief and would suffice for someone who is trying to understand this approach and decide whether it is workable for their own adult learning and training context.

  5. Feb 2019
    1. Motivating Learners

      Notes from Video -embracing change -hardcore gamers- surprising things that you find- kids are incredibly bottom-line oriented- want to be measured to see how much they are improving -"if i am not learning, then i am not having fun"- embracing change, leveling up, higher order tasks, or the game is changing -Questioning position helps students to embrace change -Compete with each other and collaborate each other -Start looking at other people online to help them to learn new things -kids that have been turned on to learning- there is no stopping them -passionate community interest group that students can join -learning has to do with learning how to join a group with a common interest -what you are doing becomes a platform for something new -trajectories through life pace as opposed to fixed points -power and importance of play- how to I take an idea and play with it to become something new -learn that not everything works- need to be willing to realize that instead of being afraid of things not working- we need to be willing to change what hasnt worked to make it work for us

    1. Encouraging students to reach out to each other to solve problems and share knowledge not only builds collaboration skills, it leads to deeper learning and understanding

      Students can help each other learn by collaborating their efforts. Each student can bring a certain strength to the group so that they can all work out problems together

    1. A primary goal of this research is to understand the relationships between two key domains: (a) teacher thought processes and knowledge and (b) teachers’ actions and their observable effects. The current work on the TPACK framework seeks to extend this tradition of research and scholarship by bringing technology integration into the kinds of knowledge that teachers need to consider when teaching

      How can teachers instruct using what they know about teaching, their content knowledge about a subject, and their knowledge about technology tools that will help them to gain full student understanding?

    2. Each situation presented to teachers is a unique combination of these three factors, and accordingly, there is no single technological solution that applies for every teacher, every course, or every view of teaching. Rather, solutions lie in the ability of a teacher to flexibly navigate the spaces defined by the three elements of content, pedagogy, and technology and the complex interactions among these elements in specific contexts

      Every teacher is student and every group of students are different. The way to use this information is to base it on how we teach the best and how our students learn the best. There is no "right" or "wrong" way but there are many different ways that work for different teachers and students

    3. As such, pedagogical knowledge requires an understanding of cognitive, social, and developmental theories of learning and how they apply to students in the classroom

      Theories help us relate what we are teaching to the learning abilities of our students. Every student learns in a different way so it is important to understand the ways that have worked in the past and relate them to our students now.

    4. Pedagogical knowledge (PK) is teachers’ deep knowledge about the processes and practices or methods of teaching and learning. They encompass, among other things, overall educational purposes, values, and aims. This generic form of knowledge applies to understanding how students learn, general classroom management skills, lesson planning, and student assessment

      This is what we learn in "teacher school". This is why we learn about many different ways of teaching and why the education system is set up the way that it is. Pedagogy is probably the most important aspect of lesson planning because it shows that we have an understanding of not only making content interesting to our students but managing behavior and assessing if they understand the information, all at the same time.

    5. Equally important to the model are the interactions between and among these bodies of knowledge, represented as PCK, TCK (technological content knowledge), TPK (technological pedagogicalknowledge), and TPACK

      The interaction of all three areas is important because it will help us to understand technology when it comes to lesson planning and content knowledge. Knowing what types of technology to use based on our pedagogical methods and the content that we are teaching our students will help us to implement them to ensure full understanding from our students.

    6. There is no “one best way” to integrate technology into curriculum. Rather, integration efforts should be creatively designed or structured for particular subject matter ideas in specific classroom contexts

      We should find ways to incorporate technology based on the content that we are teaching, the students' abilities in our classes, and our understanding of the technology that we are using. If we don't understand a certain technology or it doesn't relate to what we are teaching or the technology is too advanced for our students then incorporating the technology will be unuseful in our lessons.

    7. Understanding how these affordances and constraints of specific technologies influence what teachers do in their classrooms is not straightforward and may require rethinking teacher education and teacher professional development

      We must continue to learn new information and about new technologies so that we can better teach our students. Professional development can help us to understand the problems that can arise when using technology so that we can easily work through them when they do happen.

    8. By their very nature, newer digital technologies, which are protean, unstable, and opaque, present new challenges to teachers who are struggling to use more technology in their teaching

      How do we incorporate new technology into our teaching? What are ways in which these new technology features can be used in other ways than instruction? There has to be some place that we can use the new technology that will be beneficial to our students.

    9. Teaching with technology is complicated further considering the challenges newer technologies present to teachers. In our work, the word technology applies equally to analog and digital, as well as new and old, technologies

      We must always be prepared to learn about new information or new technology so that we can plan lessons around them. New technology and information will always come about so we must be ready when things do change (which is often).

    10. Teachers practice their craft in highly complex, dynamic classroom contexts (Leinhardt & Greeno, 1986) that require them constantly to shift and evolve their understanding

      As teachers, we must be able to think on the fly and change the direction of the lesson if students are not understanding the information we are teaching them. When we lesson plan, we try to make sure that all the students in our class are learning the information. Sometimes it doesn't work out as planned, so we have to be ready for any type of mishap or misunderstanding.

    1. It’s about the student and his or her feelings and thoughts, though often articulated clumsily and from an as yet unthought through position.

      The advice to separate self from role is good... but let's think about this as a reaction to the student above who says they feel like the instructor doesn't allow equal opportunities to contribute in the class. Sometimes, despite all best efforts, the faculty member may be wrong, and deep listening and learning has to allow for that possibility. Don't take it personally, but model the kind of leadership which recognizes the need for personal change.

    2. For example, when discussing how women’s remarks are often ignored in business settings, the class or the instructor may be ignoring the remarks of women in the class. Seeing this and talking about it in the moment can enhance people’s understanding of the issue.

      True, but how does this interact with the power differential in the classroom? Can students really be expected to productively call out faculty members' biased behavior? It seems like an option not discussed in this paper is finding external facilitators to help navigate some of these issues.

    1. Sponsorship of Youth Interests

      It is important to get on our students levels when we are teaching them information. We need to find out what their favorite things are and try to base our lesson plans on incorporating what they like along with the curriculum that we need to teach them.

    2. Connected learning does not rely on a single technology or technique. Rather, it is fostered over time through a combination of supports for developing interests, relationships, skills, and a sense of purpose.

      When we start off the year using different teaching methods and establishing healthy relationships with our students, we can help them to grow immensely in the small amount of time that we know them.

    1. 1) develop more educators, advocates, and community leaders who can leverage and advance the web as an open and public resource, and 2) impact policies and practices to ensure the web remains a healthy open and public resource for all.

      Teaching people how to use the internet safely can allow for the internet to continue to be a place that helps someone obtain information, communicate with others, and express their knowledge to others. Providing a safe environmet for people to do these things is important for successful internet usage.

    1. rigid adherence to rules does not guarantee favorable response and that deviating from rules often produces wonderful results

      I don't know about anyone else, but part of my personal pedagogical imperative is teaching the 'rules' just so students know how and when to break them well. "Look. Here's what's expected. Now that we're on the same page, let's burn it, shall we?"

  6. Jan 2019
    1. Beware lest ye contend with anyone, nay, strive to make him aware of the truth with kindly manner and most convincing exhortation. If your hearer respond, he will have responded to his own behoof, and if not, turn ye away from him, and set your faces towards God’s sacred Court, the seat of resplendent holiness.
    1. Teaching classes

      This article gives several good tips to teaching for the first time, but each teacher will need to find their own teaching persona, and through trial and error they will learn what works best for them.

    1. grading final papers

      Grading final papers isn't the best time to provide a lot of qualitative feedback because student's aren't likely to read or use it. Formative feedback should be given early in the term.

    1. check in with your students; extend availabilities to meet; offer feedback, and follow up

      These four actions can do a lot to make students feel seen and connected.

    1. Thoughts on bringing current events into your classroom.

      A conversation between a PhD student and a professor of African American studies about how to discuss current events in difficult times.

    1. creating a “humanities lab”,

      I like this idea of creating a lab for problem-based learning in humanities classes. What other STEM-related practices could humanities borrow?

    1. But these tools require we think about their purpose, method, and audience just as carefully as when we design an essay prompt, a problem set, or any other assessment exercise.

      This is an example of when meta-teaching is helpful.

    1. Our discussion made the classroom feel like it was not the professor’s class to run alone, but ours as well.

      What a great example of setting the tone on the first day of class!

    1. Inevitably, what I find reaffirms aspects of writing pedagogy I’m familiar with while giving me fresh ways to express it to the new audiences with whom I’m working.

      Teaching writing in STEM disciplines is beneficial for the students and the teacher.

    1. On bringing lessons from dissertation writing into your classroom.

      What one PhD student learned about teaching from writing his dissertation.

    1. For graduate teaching assistants, this is the time when we introduce ourselves, lay out our expectations, and, hopefully, establish the tone and level of authority that we want to convey throughout the term.

      Good advice for the first day back to school for anyone looking for new ideas.

    1. More forcefully than in any other single class, I realized the importance of universal design for learning (UDL). This curricular design features privilege multiple access points for learning, engagement, and assessment. As Dr. Jennifer Stone puts it, “designing on the front end” with UDL minimizes the need for individual learners to make a special request.

      The incorporation of UDL practices is important for all students.

    1. Regardless of your discipline, there’s a good chance that at some point you will be responsible for teaching or grading writing in some shape or form.

      This is an important point that a lot of people in fields outside of the liberal arts don't realize. Writing happens in all disciplines.

    1. graduate teaching assistants making up almost another 13 percent

      Graduate teaching assistants are filling nearly 15% of all teaching positions in higher ed. What are the consequences for undergrads?

    1. When I received Chris’s comment, my first response was that I should delete my post or at least the incorrect part of it. It’s embarrassing to have your incorrect understandings available for public view. But I decided to leave the post as is but put in a disclaimer so that others would not be misled by my misunderstandings. This experience reminded me that learning makes us vulnerable. Admitting that you don’t know something is hard and being corrected is even harder. Chris was incredibly gentle in his correction. It makes me think about how I respond to my students’ work. Am I as gentle with their work as Chris was to mine? Could I be more gentle? How often have I graded my students’ work and only focused on what they did wrong? Or forgotten that feeling of vulnerability when you don’t know something, when you put your work out for others to judge? This experience has also reminded me that it’s important that we as teachers regularly put ourselves into situations in which we authentically grapple with not knowing something. We should regularly share our less than fully formed understandings with others for feedback. It helps us remember that even confident learners can struggle with being vulnerable. And we need to keep in mind that many of our students are not confident learners.

      I'm reminded here of the broad idea that many bloggers write about sooner or later of their website being a "thought space" or place to contemplate out in the open. More often than not, even if they don't have an audience to interact with, their writings become a way of thinking out loud, clarifying things for themselves, self-evolving, or putting themselves out there for potential public reactions (good, bad, or indifferent).

      While writing things out loud to no audience can be helpful and useful on an individual level, it's often even more helpful to have some sort of productive and constructive feedback. While a handful of likes or positive seeming responses can be useful, I always prefer the ones that make me think more broadly, deeply, or force me to consider other pieces I hadn't envisioned before. To me this is the real value of these open and often very public thought spaces.

      For those interested in the general idea, I've been bookmarking/tagging things around the idea of thought spaces I've read on my own website. Hopefully this collection helps others better understand the spectrum of these ideas for themselves.

      With respect to the vulnerability piece, I'm reminded of an episode of <cite>The Human Current</cite> I listened to a few weeks back. There was an excellent section that touched on building up trust with students or even a class when it comes to providing feedback and criticism. Having a bank of trust makes it easier to give feedback as well as to receive it. Here's a link to the audio portion and a copy of the relevant text.

    2. Chris was incredibly gentle in his correction. It makes me think about how I respond to my students’ work. Am I as gentle with their work as Chris was to mine?

      What a relief to hear this. The hardest part about writing my response was in possibly coming off too hard or painfully pedantic and not wanting to turn Cathie off in her explorations.

    1. Yeahitreallyis,andIoftenthinkabouttherelationshipIhavewithmystudentswhoareinaoneyearprogramandtherelationshipIhavewithcorporatestudentsthatImightcomeinandtrainforaweekorsomethinglikethat,youknowinthefirstcoupledaysofalltrainingsessionsIhavenoabilitytocritiquebecauseIdon'thavetheirtrust.So,ifIcomeinthefirstdayofclassandsaytheirworksucksandhere'swhatyoushoulddotoimprove,andthiswillneverwork,it'smetwithresistanceandit'salmostlikeadefensemechanismagainstitandsothat'satotallyinappropriatewayformetobehave.Butifyoulookfurtherintothecurriculum,let'ssaysixteenweeksintomyoneyearprogramoraWednesdayoraThursdayinaoneweektrainingprogram,hopefullyifI'vedonemyjobwellI'vebuiltupenoughrapportwithpeopletheytrustthatIknowwhatI'mtalkingabout,thatmyfeedbackiscomingfromaplaceofloveandcareandsothey'rewillingtohearthingslike,thatisn'tverygoodandthosearewordsthatcomeoutofmymouthduringacritique.It'ssomethingthatyou'renotmaybeusedtohearingifyou'renotpartofthiscreativeculturebutthatisn'tverygoodandhere'swhy,isactuallyareally,reallyimportantthingtohelpadvancethequalityofwork.Andthenthenextsentencewouldbeandhere'showIwouldimproveitbutagainthathastocomefromaplaceofrespectandthat'searnedovertimeandsoyouknowyouhearalotaboutI'veheardalotaboutanywayandyouknowthenewbosscomesinandit'sahotshotcreativedirectoranditblowsthingsupandrunsaroundgoingintoameetingandshittingoneverythingtherewasanoldjokeatoneofmycompaniesisthatthechiefcreativeofficerwouldcomeinandswoopandpoopwherehe'dcomeintoaconference,roomtelleverybodywhathethinksuckedandleaveandnoneofthatworksbecausehedidn'thavethetrustofthepeoplethatwerehavingtheirworkshitonandsothathastocomefromaplaceoftrustagainandthatyouknowthere'snoshortcutfortimeIsupposeinthatrespect.Andspeakingofrespectoftheotherflavortherearetheotheringredientismutualrespect.It'ssayingthingslike,lookyouwerehiredbecauseItrustyoubecauseyou'regoodatyourcraft,youhavepotentialandexpertise,nowlet'stalkaboutwhatyou'redoingwrongandhowtoimproveit.
  7. Dec 2018
    1. But the reason I wanted to go back in that moment was the same reason students want to stick with familiar grading systems: I know how it works, I know how to communicate about it, I know how to get the best results from it, and it sticks within the letter-grading system I’ve used for 20 years as a teacher and longer as a student. I can recite all the dangers and disadvantages of letter grading, but because it’s the system I’ve known for pretty much my entire life, there’s still a certain comfort to it, and whenever things get weird or challenging or unpredictable, I get an atavistic desire to go back to what is familiar.

      This is beautiful - acknowledging discomfort on the part of both teacher and student.

  8. Nov 2018
    1. Another problematic, though not unanticipated, consequence of the use of hospitalists has been a diminished role for specialists and researchers on teaching ser-vices. Because specialists are far less likely than they once were to serve as inpatient attendings, trainees have less contact with them and less exposure to basic and translational science
    1. For house staff in internal medicine, the introduc-tion of hospitalists may mean a greater likelihood ofbeing supervised by attending physicians who arehighly skilled and experienced in providing inpatientcare. House staff have long enjoyed a certain amountof autonomy, because many of their faculty supervi-sors have been relatively unfamiliar with moderninpatient care. Such autonomy may be diminishedwith the new approach to inpatient care. Althoughthere is bound to be transitional pain, we believethat the potential for improved inpatient teachingwill more than compensate for it. Moreover, thischange will help answer public calls for closer andmore effective faculty oversight of house staff andstudents.34
    1. Instructional Design Strategies for Intensive Online Courses: An Objectivist-Constructivist Blended Approach

      This was an excellent article Chen (2007) in defining and laying out how a blended learning approach of objectivist and constructivist instructional strategies work well in online instruction and the use of an actual online course as a study example.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. At the intersection of technology and pedagogy:considering styles of learning and teaching

      When examining the pedagogy of learning, teacher and student centered approaches, there is additional evidence supporting a model moving more towards technology-based learning. This articles considers the question of technology in the classroom and its' advantages/disadvantages.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Study: Most Teaching and Learning Uses Technology Nowadays

      This article reviews the impact of technology in the classroom. Today over 73% of teachers stated students are using tablets or laptops in the classroom. According to David Nagel, technology not only dominates education but also make students more productive and stimulates them intellectually.

      There is a link on the site to the complete study.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Distance Education Trends: Integrating new technologies to foster student interaction and collaboration

      This article explores the interaction of student based learner-centered used of technology tools such as wikis, blogs and podcasts as new and emerging technology tools. With distance learning programs becoming more and more popular, software applications such as Writeboard, InstaCol and Imeem may become less of the software of choice. The article looks closely at the influence of technology and outcomes.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  9. Oct 2018
    1. Planners are also unlikely to continue with their studies after they finish their examinations. They are rather glad it is over. Experts, on the other hand, would not even consider voluntarily giving up what has already proved to be rewarding and fun:

      This could be a hint for instructional design/approaching teaching?

    1. Dissimilarly, in Teaching to Transgress, bell hooks urges teachers to contemplate “Education as the practice of freedom” as their point of departure for praxis. A phrase originating from the work of Paulo Freire, hooks writes that “education as the practice of freedom” will come easiest “to those of us…who believe that our work is not merely to share information, but to share in the intellectual and spiritual growth of our students. To teach in a manner that respects and cares for the souls of our students is essential if we are to provide the necessary conditions where learning can most deeply and intimately begin.” Transgressive education and disruptive thinking therefore begin with the soul, and not the prospective career opportunities, of students.
  10. Sep 2018
  11. www-jstor-org.proxy.library.georgetown.edu www-jstor-org.proxy.library.georgetown.edu
    1. we have yet to fully explore if or how the content in a first-year composition class influences the writing knowledge and practice students develop in such a setting, and thus the knowledge and practice they can use in other sites of writing

      Transfer, definition of

  12. Aug 2018
    1. The study also looked at how technology helped teaching effectiveness. A large majority of educators, 87 percent, said technology had positively affected their ability to teach. Eleven percent said they felt technology had no effect on the quality of their teaching. Just two percent said technology had a negative effect on teaching.
  13. Jul 2018
    1. I also think as educators we should own what we make, or at least have it released to the Commons. Copyright on teacher created materials in the public school makes little sense. Nobody wants to steal your stuff and no municipality will ever profit on sales. Give it an open license.
    1. In the IRT model the gradual release of responsibility is accomplished through three phases of online research and comprehension instruction which aims “to increase academic engagement, encourage active reading, and promote students as experts in online research and comprehension”

      Internet Reciprocal Teaching- Great article on discussing 3 stages- also great chart to explain it!

    1. Understanding cannot simply be told; the learner has to actively construct meaning (or misconceptions and forget-fulness will ensue)

      Teachers must teach for understanding and this can only by done through giving students a chance to analyze and relate/transfer the information in a way that they understand.

    1. Automated grading is supposed to “free” the instructor for other tasks, except there is no more important task.

      Absolutely vital for our understanding of grading and faculty work.

  14. May 2018
    1. Although K-12 settings and children are referenced, I find the information in this document relates to all people -- students in all settings.

  15. Mar 2018
    1. de kriterier för bedömning som ska fungera som stöd för lärarens bedömning blir både innehåll och mål för eleverna i undervisningen.
    2. med våra nuvarande styrdokument har vi fått kursplaner som verkligen kommer eleverna till mötes i denna strävan efter snabbaste vägen till ett betyg. Medan lärare tidigare har försökt balansera elevernas önskan om genvägar med en strävan efter djupare kunskaper är de numera i det närmaste ålagda att istället ägna sig åt att visa eleverna hur de kan visa sitt kunnande
    3. De lär sig att uttrycka sig som om de hade djupa och verkliga kunskaper men i verkligheten är kunskaperna ofta mycket ytliga.
    1. Language teaching has been my career since I left university, I completed my Post Graduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) back in the 1980s at Warwick and I had worked for 15 years in secondary education rising to a leadership role before joining the Language Centre as a part-time tutor when my children were still young

      Language teaching career

  16. Feb 2018
    1. It goes against the conventional teacher wisdom that says students have to handle abstract ideas, and what the heck does writing physically have to do with that?

      Teachers should not make students handle abstract ideas, if anything, that may be what leads to students losing interest or misunderstanding what is being discussed. How can a student learn with nothing to relate to or translate abstract ideas into physical problems and results?

  17. Dec 2017
    1. This is not a new idea, but the current usage of the term “flipped” is generally associated with students engaging with materials online followed by in-class activities that involve peer learning or small-group work. There are many activities that can be part of a flipped class such as discussions, debates, clicker questions, Q and A, demonstrations, simulations, peer tutoring and feedback, and role playing. An instructor may choose to flip just a few classes a term, where the concepts lend themselves to active learning experiences, or to flip all classes. 

      Bahar Güner Student Centred innovative teaching technique

  18. Nov 2017
  19. Oct 2017
    1. As an outcome of this Delphi Panel exercise, this study hasrevised Jane Knight’s commonlyaccepted working definition for internationalisation as'theintentionalprocess ofintegrating an international, intercultural or global dimension into the purpose, functionsand delivery of post-secondary education,in order to enhance the quality of educationand research for all students and staff, and to make a meaningful contribution tosociety'.This definition reflects the increased awareness that internationalisation has to becomemore inclusive and less elitistby not focusing predominantly on mobility but more on thecurriculum and learning outcomes. The ‘abroad’ component (mobility) needs to become anintegral part of the internationalised curriculum to ensure internationalisation for all, notonly the mobile minority. It re-emphasises that internationalisation is not a goal in itself,but a means to enhance quality, and that it should not focus solely on economic rationales.Most national strategies, including in Europe, are still predominantly focused on mobility,short-term and/or long-term economic gains, recruitment and/or training of talentedstudents and scholars, and international reputation and visibility. This implies that fargreater efforts are still needed to incorporate these approaches into more comprehensivestrategies, in which internationalisation of the curriculum and learning outcomes, as ameans to enhance the quality of education and research, receive more attention. Theinclusion of ‘internationalisation at home’ as a third pillar in the internationalisation strategyof the European Commission,European Higher Education in the World, as well as in severalnational strategies, is a good starting point, but it will require more concrete actions at theEuropean, national and,in particular, the institutional level for it to becomereality

      Using inclusive approaches to ensure all students have access to quality teaching and learning and why it shouldn't be limited to the mobile few. I find it interesting since a lot of research focuses on the gain for international students only.

  20. Sep 2017
    1. educational resource called Science in the Classroom (SitC) that “helps students understand the structure and workings of professional scientific research.” It looks like this:

      This could be achieved with Hypothesis on it's own, right? I mean, I can see that AAAS wants to continue using their system, but if you're not the AAAS, you could setup something similar using just hypothesis, to teach students how to read academic texts, no?

  21. Aug 2017
    1. Realmente promueve la construcción de conocimiento porque obliga a activar el pensamiento individual, a buscar formas de investigar sea en forma independiente o en grupo, y promueve valores en forma semiconsciente como la cooperación, la responsabilidad, la comunicación, el trabajo en equipo, la autoevaluación individual y de los compañeros (ITESM,2001).

      Working and collaborating will promote faster language acquisition

  22. Jul 2017
    1. The underlying lesson of the basics was about the social order and its sources of authority, a lesson which was appropriate for a society which expected its workers to be passively disciplined.

      preparing our students for jobs that may not yet exist.

    2. School was a universe of straightforwardly right and wrong answers, of authoritative texts and authoritarian teachers.

      moving away from the red pen and the bad grades, we recognized that our job as teachers is not to pass or fail our students, our job is to teach them to create and obtain information from themselves, to guide them in the right direction for them to learn.

    3. we spoke of the need to conceive meaning-making as a form of design or active and dynamic transformation of the social world, and its contemporary forms increasingly multimodal, in which the linguistic, the visual, the audio, the gestural and the spatial modes of meaning were increasingly integrated in everyday media and cultural practices. These constituted the second of the ‘multis’—the inherent multimodality of contemporary forms of representation. As a consequence, the traditional emphasis on alphabetical literacy (letter sounds in words in sentences in texts in literatures) would need to be supplemented in a pedagogy of Multiliteracies by learning how to read and write multimodal texts which integrated the other modes with language.

      When teaching languages, the importance of changing the pedagogy to integrate multiliteracies.

    4. A pedagogy of Multiliteracies would need to address this as a fundamental aspect of contemporary teaching and learning.

      As thecnology evolves pedagogy needs to keep up with the rapid changes. Our students do not learn the same way they did 10 years ago, when most of the new teacher attended schools.

    1. It is the responsibility of educators in all grades and content areas to modify as needed for learners.

      Educators guiding these students should have the necessary skills to effectively modify the route of the inquiry. some may argue that pre-k students are too young for this projects, but with the right guidance even little ones can benefit from it.

    1. In my classroom, we spend a lot of time talking about how to summarize a text by finding pertinent points and casting them in one’s own words.

      As a foreing language teacher, we need ti remind our students that information has to be summarize and analize in order to use it.

    1. How can we develop adequate understanding when the very object that we seek to study continuously changes?

      This can be seen as a problem or as an advantage, information is always changing, ideas are been created and developed. Students and teachers do not need to wait for books to print materials to be accessible, is right there.. one click away, now how we find and analyze information on the web is the tool our students need to become web literate .

    2. Consider, for example, just a few of these new technologies: Twitter, Facebook, Google+, Siri, Foursquare, Drop-box, Skype, Chrome, iMovie, Contribute, or any of many, many mobile “apps” and ebooks

      students using this sites need to have web-literacy skills to obtain accurate and relevant information.

    1. knowledge of student thinking and learning, knowledge of subject matter, and increasingly, knowledge of technology.

      3 important factors

    2. At the heart of good teaching with technology are three core components: content, pedagogy, and technology, plus the relationships among and between them. The interactions between and among the three components, playing out differently across diverse contexts, account for the wide variations seen in the extent and quality of educational technology integration.
    3. TPACK framework seeks to extend this tradition of research and scholarship by bringing technology integration into the kinds of knowledge that teachers need to consider when teaching. The TPACK framework seeks to assist the development of better techniques for discovering and describing how technology-related professional knowledge is implemented and instantiated in practice.

      Having the skills to incorporate the right amount of technology will determine success.

    4. Email does not afford synchronous communication in the way that a phone call, a face-to-face conversation, or instant messaging does. Nor does email afford the conveyance of subtleties of tone, intent, or mood possible with face-to-face communication.

      extremely important when "negocioation of meaning" is at play

    1. The key to successful technology integration is the efficient use of digital tools tools that are appropriate for the task.

      not all technologies are appropiate for all tasks!

    2.  Teachers in the substitution and augmentation phase can use technology to accomplish traditional tasks,  but the real learning gains result from engaging students in learning experiences that could not be accomplished without technology. At the Modification and Redefinition level, the task changes and extends the walls of the classroom.

      The idea of teaching foreing languages without the use of teachnology is imposible for me, and to any other educatior that base their lesson in current information to spark the student's interest.

    3. As many districts jump on board with 1:1 implementation, Apple’s use of the SAMR model as a framework for tech integration presents a consistent, clear and powerful message that is spreading!

      This reminded me of the struggle as a school administrator to "roll-out" the 1:1 program without giving teachers the PD necesary to develop a teaching plan with such great tool.

    1. One way to do this is by introducing teachers to the different analytical frameworks they can use to assess, select, and use technology in their instruction. These are basically conceptual models that provide a number of guidelines for teachers to reflect on when trying to implement technology in class.

      How much technology is too much?

    2. SAMR (Substitution, Augmentation, Modification, and Redefinition) is  a four-level conceptual framework  developed by Dr Ruben Puentedura (2006) to help teachers make  effective use of technology in their instruction

      What is SAMR? After reading about this model, I concluded that SMAR is a process to help teacher evaluate technology and integrated into lessons to facilitate student learning.

    1. "What our collaborative learning style empowers and enables is a student's resilience -- how do you look to your neighbor as a resource, how do you test your own theories, how do you understand if you're on the right track or the wrong track?" says Monique DeVane, College Prep's head of school. "It teaches them that it's not just about content; it's about cultivating habits of mind that are the underpinnings of deeper scholarship."
    1. participants spent almost 40 minutes out of every 100-minute class period using the internet for nonacademic purposes

      There'll be times when I explicitly say, pull out your laptops if you have them, and we use them in class. And other times I explicitly say, close your screens. Either way, this stat here is well worth sharing with students at the start of the semester.

    1. By tweeting, blogging, reading blogs, social bookmarking and annotating, and even simply lurking on digital platforms with their peers, students can become members of our classroom communities and not simply play the role of student.

      technology and the role of the student in the classroom

    1. Visual-Spatial - think in terms of physical space, as do architects and sailors. Very aware of their environments. They like to draw, do jigsaw puzzles, read maps, daydream. They can be taught through drawings, verbal and physical imagery. Tools include models, graphics, charts, photographs, drawings, 3-D modeling, video, videoconferencing, television, multimedia, texts with pictures/charts/graphs. Bodily-kinesthetic - use the body effectively, like a dancer or a surgeon. Keen sense of body awareness. They like movement, making things, touching. They communicate well through body language and be taught through physical activity, hands-on learning, acting out, role playing. Tools include equipment and real objects. Musical - show sensitivity to rhythm and sound. They love music, but they are also sensitive to sounds in their environments. They may study better with music in the background. They can be taught by turning lessons into lyrics, speaking rhythmically, tapping out time. Tools include musical instruments, music, radio, stereo, CD-ROM, multimedia. Interpersonal - understanding, interacting with others. These students learn through interaction. They have many friends, empathy for others, street smarts. They can be taught through group activities, seminars, dialogues. Tools include the telephone, audio conferencing, time and attention from the instructor, video conferencing, writing, computer conferencing, E-mail. Intrapersonal - understanding one's own interests, goals. These learners tend to shy away from others. They're in tune with their inner feelings; they have wisdom, intuition and motivation, as well as a strong will, confidence and opinions. They can be taught through independent study and introspection. Tools include books, creative materials, diaries, privacy and time. They are the most independent of the learners. Linguistic - using words effectively. These learners have highly developed auditory skills and often think in words. They like reading, playing word games, making up poetry or stories. They can be taught by encouraging them to say and see words, read books together. Tools include computers, games, multimedia, books, tape recorders, and lecture. Logical -Mathematical - reasoning, calculating. Think conceptually, abstractly and are able to see and explore patterns and relationships. They like to experiment, solve puzzles, ask cosmic questions. They can be taught through logic games, investigations, mysteries. They need to learn and form concepts before they can deal with details.

      Multiple intelligences

    1. How do you respond to a medical emergency if the people around you speak only Spanish?

      Project with Real world connections in the TL!

  23. Jun 2017
  24. May 2017
    1. group discussion

      Link to Lewis et al (2006) Lesson Study, Afflerbach et al (2008) modeling and explaining

  25. Apr 2017
    1. primitiveutterances

      It's interesting that "primitive" is the keyword here, we still use basic, monosyllabic commands and signals in our technological, complex society when we're in similar circumstances (for instance, signaling someone for backing up a truck with "Keep going" and "STOP"), and nowadays we have a greater presence of voice commands in technology ("Okay Google Navigate Home" "Siri Call Jenna"). But at the same time, this line really speaks to me as a teacher, when I annotate a student's paper and try not to just write "Interesting" or "Don't do that," and try to contort it into a full paragraph of advice, because that's What Advice Looks Like. Even if it's just "I laughed at your joke"

    1. rigorous experimentation and creative pedagogical radicalism

      These are high ideals, and he just said that he wasn't going to offer a "how to teach" guide. Hmm... still I bend toward wanting to know what this means in practice.

  26. Mar 2017
    1. Students need learning goals, and they need to set these for themselves.

      Again, assumes quite a bit of freedom on the part of the students. Institutional goals/outcomes or disciplinary goals/outcomes that have to be included?

    2. There is probably no need to release all the content at once. Doing so (to the tune of about 15 weeks worth of content) could be way overwhelming for any student. Releasing all the content at once around a very specific chunk of the course makes the most sense.

      Chunked release of information--here's everything we're doing for unit 2, for example? Or two weeks' worth because things are additive/scaffolded?

    3. For the most part, I made myself go through the modules in the order in which they were created. I assumed they were placed in that order for a specific reason. If I hit content I already knew or didn’t want to apply just yet then I skipped over it to return to later if needed.

      This is a lot of faith in the instructor (and not necessarily misplaced). It also requires a certain level of pre-existing familiarity to make those decisions about what is/is not useful and a certain intention in taking the course (i.e., there won't be an exam and the course is mostly voluntary).

    1. just because I "free" someone, doesn't mean that he/she will know what to do next, nor how to do it effectively

      Good point. What's the way to bring students to use technology effectively?

  27. Feb 2017
    1. Whenever a man speaks or writes, he is supposed, as a rational being, to have some end in view; either to inform, or to amuse, or to persuade, or, in some way or other,

      This example of eloquence is one that I still see rather frequently being taught as a literary tool, speaking in reference to the questionable ways that rhetoric was said to be taught earlier in this piece.

      I agree very much with the common misconception of the term as fluff to poor arguments, but in the written form, it is often taught to still relate every piece of work back to the general idea to answer the "so what," something that may not be present in all forms of teaching, however

  28. Dec 2016
    1. That is, what if we asked our students to recreate the type of abstracting experiments performed by the likes of Galton and Bertillon, but to use today’s technology? Better yet, what if we asked them to recreate today’s machine-reading systems using 19th century tools? This sort of historical-fictive practice doesn’t require students’ experiments to “work”, per se. Rather, it asks them to consider the steps taken and decisions made along the way. The whys and hows and wheres.

      This would be a fantastic thing to do in HIST3812. Also, the sort of thing Jentery Sayers might be up to.

  29. Nov 2016
    1. Speech, writing, math notation, various kinds of graphs, and musical notation are all examples of cognitive technologies. They are tools that help us think, and they can become part of the way we think -- and change the way we think.

      Computer interfaces can be cognitive technologies. To whatever degree an interface reflects a set of ideas or methods of working, mastering the interface provides mastery of those ideas or methods.

      Experts often have ways of thinking that they rarely share with others, for various reasons. Sometimes they aren't fully aware of their thought processes. The thoughts may be difficult to convey in speech or print. The thoughts may seem sloppy compared to traditional formal explanations.

      These thought processes often involve:

      • minimal canonical examples - simple models
      • heuristics for rapid reasoning about what might work

      Nielsen considers turning such thought processes into (computer) interfaces. "Every theorem of mathematics, every significant result of science, is a challenge to our imagination as interface designers. Can we find ways of expressing these principles in an interface? What new objects and operations does a principle suggest?"

    1. Finding tutors can be a really tiring job if not taken in a proper direction. Also, it is equally important to find a competent and knowledgeable tutor, who can provide a proper direction and guidance in your studies rather than just basic teaching. As a student, you should always keep in mind that before hiring a tutor you should have a complete idea of his knowledge about that particular subject.