731 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. when you're dealing with living systems you have to be careful that you 01:00:25 don't get caught in engineering responses

      for - quote - Nora Bateson - book - Combining

      quote - Nora Bateson - book - Combining - (see below)

      • When you're dealing with living systems
        • you have to be careful that you don't get caught in engineering responses
    2. the SGS are a match what are the problems 00:59:31 there they are they're in the boxes if you look at the woman nursing her baby that's the meat

      for - book - combining - Nora Bateson - chapter - meet, not match - examples

      book - combining - Nora Bateson - chapter - meet, not match - examples - match - SDGs - parenting - reward and punishment - problem / solution - poverty / money - climate change / negative emissions technology - war / peace - meet - mother nursing baby - parenting - understanding and communication

    3. I promise to show you my whole 00:57:00 self in so much as I can

      for - book - Combining - Nora Bateson - Meet, not Match - Wedding Vows

    4. story of getting lost

      for - book - Combining - Nora Bateson - Meet, not Match - Getting lost together story

      book - Combining - Nora Bateson - Meet, not Match - Getting lost together story - Getting lost together, when embraced creates the space to learn together - Nora learned that from getting lost with her children - Together, they learned how to cocreate a solution

    5. hat meet not match chapter is 00:50:10 a hard chapter

      for - book - Combining - Nora Bateson - chapter - Meet, not Match - a difficult chapter

    6. it's very abstract to break life into boxes and create supposedly linear causal processes

      for - book - Combining - rationale for title

      book - Combining - rationale for title - Combining is the opposite of breaking apart and analysis

  2. Jun 2024
    1. that's why it's called combining because you as a reader are combining um just like you do when you listen to a piece of music

      for - book - Combining - rationale of title

      book - Combining - rationale of title - The person who buys the book interacts with it in a unique way - based on their unique lebenswelt, meaningverse and perspectival knowing of reality

    2. the solution to the consequence is likely to perpetuate the actual problem

      for - quote - progress trap - Nora Bateson - book - Combining

      quote - progress trap - Nora Bateson - book - Combining - (see below)

      • In the singularity of its mission to hastily fix one malady at a time
        • the cure may be more harmful than the wound
      • Most identified problems as they have emerged
        • are really the consequence or symptoms of other conditions
      • The solution to the consequence is likely to perpetuate the actual problem
    3. for - book - Combining - Nora Bateson - podcast - Entangled World - Navigating the greatest challenges of our time - interview - A New World Combining - Nora Bateson

      summary - Nora discusses her book, Combining

    1. Those larger goals highlighted edu-cation for good citizenship; to them great books were more of anantidote than a contributor to that bland, conformist mass culturefeared by mid-century critics (left and liberal and conservative) anddescribed by cultural historians.

      How, if at all, did the great books idea contribute to the idea of Manufacturing Consent for the 20th century?

  3. May 2024
    1. According to the head of Poland’s Armament Agency, General Artur Kuptel, describing the system in Polish media earlier this month, radars suspended from the tethered balloons will monitor the sky as far as Ukraine, Belarus, and the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad from Polish air space.Advertisement · Scroll to continue

      Hm, nice establishing shot?

    1. Proyecto "Anotación PFR" https://github.com/lmichan/PFR

      Tema/mesh/D012137/RespiratorySystem

      TipoDePrueba/mesh/D002000/ForcedSpirometry,

      TipoDePrueba/mesh/D011653/PulmonaryDiffusingCapacity,

      TipoDePrueba/mesh/D010993/PlethysmographyWholeBody,

      TipoDePrueba/mesh/D000403/AirwayResistance,

      TipoDePrueba/mesh/D001784/BloodGasAnalysis,

      EtapaPrueba/Interpretacion,

      PatronFuncional/Obstruccion,

      PatronFuncional/PosibleRestriccion,

      PatronFuncional/PosibleMixto,

      PatronFuncional/Normal,

      PatronFuncional/Broncodilatacion,

      PatronFuncional/NoBroncodilatacion,

      PatronFuncional/RestriccionSimple,

      PatronFuncional/RestriccionCompleja,

      PatronFuncional/TrastornoMixto,

      PatronFuncional/VolumenesNormales,

      PatronFuncional/Hiperinflacion,

      PatronFuncional/PulmonesGrandes,

      PatronFuncional/AumentoFlujoSanguineo,

      PatronFuncional/AnormalidadVascularPulmonar,

      PatronFuncional/PerdidaVolumenLocalizada,

      PatronFuncional/PerdidaAlveoloCapilar,

      PatronFuncional/DifusionNormal,

      PatronFuncional/ImpedanciaNormal,

      PatronFuncional/ObstruccionViaAereaPequeña,

      PatronFuncional/ObstruccionViaAereaTotal,

      PatronFuncional/AlteracionReactancia,

      PatronFuncional/Normoxemia,

      PatronFuncional/Hipoxemia,

      PatronFuncional/AcidosisRespiratoria,

      PatronFuncional/AcidosisMetabolica,

      PatronFuncional/AlcalosisRespiratoria,

      PatronFuncional/AlcalosisMetabolica,

    1. Proyecto "Anotación PFR" https://github.com/lmichan/PFR Tema/mesh/D012137/RespiratorySystem,

      TipoDePrueba/mesh/D002000/ForcedSpirometry,

      TipoDePrueba/mesh/D011653/PulmonaryDiffusingCapacity,

      TipoDePrueba/mesh/D010993/PlethysmographyWholeBody,

      EtapaPrueba/Interpretacion, Enfermedad/mesh/D001249/Asthma,

      Enfermedad/mesh/D029424/ChronicObstructivePulmonaryDisease,

      Enfermedad/mesh/D017563/InterstitialLungDisease,

    1. Proyecto "Anotación PFR", https://github.com/lmichan/PFR,

      Tema/mesh/D006266/HealthEducation,

      TipoDePrueba/mesh/D002000/ForcedSpirometry,

      EtapaPrueba/Estandar,

      PatronFuncional/Obstruccion,

      PatronFuncional/PosibleRestriccion,

      PatronFuncional/PosibleMixto,

      PatronFuncional/Normal,

      PatronFuncional/Broncodilatacion,

      PatronFuncional/NoBroncodilatacion,

      Enfermedad/mesh/D001249/Asthma,

      Enfermedad/mesh/D029424/ChronicObstructivePulmonaryDisease,

      Enfermedad/mesh/D017563/InterstitialLungDisease,

      Enfermedad/mesh/D011009/Pneumoconiosis

    1. Proyecto "Anotación PFR", https://github.com/lmichan/PFR,

      Tema/mesh/D058007/PhysiciansPrimaryCare,

      TipoDePrueba/mesh/D002000/ForcedSpirometry,

      EtapaPrueba/Clinica,

      PatronFuncional/Obstruccion,

      PatronFuncional/PosibleRestriccion,

      PatronFuncional/PosibleMixto,

      PatronFuncional/Normal,

      PatronFuncional/Broncodilatacion,

      PatronFuncional/NoBroncodilatacion,

      Enfermedad/mesh/D029424/ChronicObstructivePulmonaryDisease,

      Enfermedad/mesh/D011656/PulmonaryEmphysema,

      Enfermedad/mesh/D001991/Bronchitis,

    1. The Book of Hours was largely developed at the artist’s colony at Worpswede, but finished in Paris. It displays the turn towards mystical religiosity that was developing in the poet, in contrast to the naturalism popular at the time, after the religious inspiration he experienced in Russia. Soon thereafter, however, Rilke developed a highly practical approach to writing, encouraged by Rodin’s emphasis on objective observation. This rejuvenated inspiration resulted in a profound transformation of style, from the subjective and mystical incantations to his famous Ding-Gedichte, or thing-poems, that were published in the New Poems.

      Naturalism was prevalent in the time of Rilke (circa 1900s). Rilke, however, had a mystical experience in Russia? (did he literally have an experience of unity and bliss?) He combined this mysticism with the objectivity that he learned from Auguste Rodin.


      As a result, his writing had a mystical and objective bent to it. How exactly? Was this also present in his Apollo poems (1907)?

    1. I started to use in the 00:58:01 little book the music of Life a way of exploring that metaphor

      for - follow up - book - The Music of Life - Biology Beyond Genes

      to - book - The Music of Life - Biology Beyond Genes - https://hyp.is/OI8RVBYIEe-t-rObPCPKoQ/www.univ.ox.ac.uk/book/the-music-of-life-biology-beyond-genes/

    2. we also challenge in the book The Very concept of selfishness itself

      for - book - Understanding living systems - challenging selfishness - critique - of Richard Dawkins' Selfish Gene

      • Ray Noble points out a contradiction in Richard Dawkin's use of the word selfish in his "Selfish gene".
        • Unless there is purposefulness, choice and agency, there cannot be any concept of selfishness
    3. for - Denis Noble - Ready Noble - evolutionary biology - critique of Richard Dawkins Selfish Gene theory - critique of gene centrism - book - Understanding Living Systems - human agency

      summary - In this informative interview, brothers Denis and Ray Noble discuss their new book - Understanding Living Systems, and - dispel the 70 year old narrative of Gene centrism and the selfish gene as determining the high level behaviour of living organisms

    1. for - recombination of proteins in higher level proteins - from - youtube - Evolution 2 podcast interview - book - Understanding Living Systems - Denis Noble - Ray Noble

      from - youtube - Evolution 2 podcast interview - book - Understanding Living Systems - Denis Noble - Ray Noble - https://hyp.is/OttWABYFEe--gLNFyeNyTw/docdrop.org/video/oHZI1zZ_BhY/

    1. for - Oded Rechavi - neurobiology - gene centrism - critique - from - youtube podcast interview - book - Understanding Living Systems - Ray Noble - Denis Noble

      summary - Rechavi performed experiments with C Elegan and demonstrated that it possesses a type of neuron that - produces RNA that in response to elevated temperature change is transmitted to reproductive cells so that the offsprings encode it in the genome, and it is better adapted to deal with elevated temperatures

      question - How many species do this? Is it generally found throughout nature?

      from - outube podcast interview - book - Understanding Living Systems - Ray Noble - Denis Noble - https://hyp.is/OUlGVBXrEe-iaBeZhH_4DQ/docdrop.org/video/oHZI1zZ_BhY/

    1. four 00:08:25 major common misunderstandings that have infected our understanding of what it is to be a living system

      for - molecular biology - paradigm shift - living system - 4 common misunderstandings - book - Understanding Living Systems - 4 common misunderstandings

      4 common misunderstandings of living systems - 1. The central dogma of molecular biology - one way causation - Genes (DNA) to - proteins to - organism - 2. The Weismann Barrier - 3. DNA as self-replicator - 4. Separation of Replicator (DNA) and Vehicle (Living cell) are completely separate

    2. the message I've put here we wish them all 00:03:44 well because that's the ending of my new book coming out next month

      for - metaphor - refuting genome as - book of life

    3. biology Beyond The 00:00:19 genome

      for - book - Biology Beyond the Genome - author - scientist - biologist - Denis Noble - book - Understanding Living Systems

    1. "The great books are the inexhaustible books. The books that can sustain a lifetime of reading."

    2. "The great books are the books that never have to be written again. They are so good no-one can try to write them again."

    3. "The great books are the books that everyone wants to have read but no-one wants to read."

    4. What did not stand out to me before while reading the book, but does now when watching this, is the fact that the greatest books are subjective to each individual... Meaning my list might not be the same for others.

    5. Very fascinating thought experiment. Out of the 140+ books I have read so far only a few, less than a handful, would fit the list of "growth" books; the greatest, that I would take to the deserted island for 10 years...

      1. The Bible
      2. Antonin Sertillanges' The Intellectual Life: Its Spirit, Method, Conditions
      3. Marcus Aurelius' Meditations

      No other book, to my mind, that I have read so far would cut it to my list.

    1. ¹¹ For you al-ways have the poor with you, but you will notalways have me.

      Said in the context of his pending crucifixion, with respect to a woman who had poured expensive ointment on Jesus.

      This is an interesting proposition in this passage with respect to lots of what he'd said about the poor in the past. See also the Beatitudes

      relationship to the idea of "Waging war on poverty, but not on the poor"?

    1. A book entry, which summarizes my thoughts on a book I’ve recently finished reading (see #917 in the image below).

      It looks like the Stephen King entry has a picture of the book cover taped into it. This is an interesting idea.

    1. By that point, Mr. Auster had largely stopped reading reviews, arguing that even the positive reviews often miss the point. “No good can come of it,” he said in the interview in The Independent. “I spare my fragile soul.”

      How much time do book reviewers really spend on either a book or their actual review? Often it's a rushed process at best. How much can a reader get out of a quick read and gut reaction?

      Perhaps things may be good from some of the best of the best reviewers, but generally, the author likely put more work into their work than the reviewer did.

  4. Apr 2024
    1. urged his disciples to delve into the ever-present sense of “I” to reach its Source

      adjacency - between - Ernest Becker - book - The Birth and Death of Meaning - Eastern meditation to interrogate sense of self - adjacency statement - Becker writes and speculates about the anthropology and cultural history of the origin of the self construct - It is a fascinating question to compare Becker's ideas with Eastern ideas of dissolving the constructed psychological self

    2. Clark E. Moustakas in his delightful and seminal book Loneliness

      follow up - book - Loneliness - author - Clark E. Moustakas

    3. ‘Living the Life That You Are: Finding Wholeness When You Feel Lost, Isolated, and Afraid

      follow up - book - ‘Living the Life That You Are: Finding Wholeness When You Feel Lost, Isolated, and Afraid - author - Nic Higham

    1. for - book - Citizens - foreward - Brian Eno

    2. The new story becomes an invisible force which pulls us forward.

      for - stories - salience of adjacency- imagination - stories - futures - Ernest Becker - self - timebinding - symbolosphere - quote - Brian Eno - book - Citizens - Jon Alexander - Arian Conrad - citizens - not consumers

      quote - Brian Eno

      • The stories we tell
        • shape how we see ourselves, and
        • how we see the world.
      • When we see the world differently,
        • we begin behaving differently,
        • living into the new story.
      • When Martin Luther King said
        • “I have a dream,”
      • he was
        • inviting others to dream it with him,
        • inviting them to step into his story.
      • Once a story becomes shared in that way,
        • current reality gets measured against it and
        • then modified towards it.
      • As soon as we sense the possibility of a more desirable world,
        • we begin behaving differently,
          • as though that world is starting to come into existence,
          • as though, in our minds at least, we’re already there.
      • The new story becomes an invisible force which pulls us forward.
      • By this process it starts to come true.
      • Imagining the future makes it more possible.

      • Sometimes this work of imagination and storytelling is about the future,

        • as in Dr King’s story.
      • Art can play this role:
        • what is possible in art becomes thinkable in life.
      • We become our new selves first in simulacrum, through
        • style and
        • fashion and
        • art,
      • our deliberate immersions in virtual worlds.
      • Through them we sense what it would like
        • to be another kind of person
        • with other kinds of values.
      • We rehearse new
        • feelings and
        • sensitivities.
      • We imagine other ways of thinking about
        • our world and
        • its future.
      • We use art to model new worlds so that
        • we can see how we might feel about them.

      comment - This is a really powerful writing from Brian Eno. - Storytelling is an exercise in - the imagination of alternative possibilities to our own reality. - Stories can become both - inspirational and - aspirational - They can paint a picture in our mind of - a fantasy - a world that does not yet exist - but that nonexistent but desirable reality can then serve as the goal for which we strive - Mapping Futures interventions is then, essentially an act of desirable, inspirational make believe, and mustering the resources to turn the fantasy into reality - Progress relies on design, the imagination of unrealities in vivid detail, - in order to turn them into realities - In doing this, it is not an act carried out in ivory towers, - but in the everyday life of every one of us - We are all engaged in desirable fantasies daily whenever - we decide what meal we will prepare or restaurant to dine at - which clothing outfit to wear today - what we plan to write or say next to another - Every decision we make as a choice between different future alternatives - When it comes to planning major future decisions, - we need to have as much detail as possible of the imagined future - The Town Anywhere project conceived by Ruth Ben-Tovin and employed in the Transition Town movement for many years fis an example of such a simulacrum - https://hyp.is/mqeCtAE_Ee-Yxleqg7GFww/docdrop.org/video/cRvhY4S94ic/ - It provides an artistic space for citizens to imagine a desirable fantasy that can be embodied, enacted and deeply remembered through the participatory and collective citizen act of creating a proxy of their future local habitat in the present, and exploring and momentarily inhabiting their simulacrum. - In this way, this compelling experience is like a branding iron, searing the memory deep into our memory, where it can help guide our actions to realize the desirable fantasy. - Couched within a citizen's FREEligion and FREElosophy we generically call Deep Humanity, an open source, open knowledge approach to universal raison d'etre for what it deeply means to be human, Town Anywhere can scale to fire up the imagination of citizens to co-create our collective future. - Town Anywhere, along with other citizen initiatives which I belong to that advocate healthy citizen power such as SONEC, Stop Reset Go, Deep Humanity, the Indyweb, Living Cities Earth and many, many others can emerge a human murmuration to drive the transition - https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Fleemor.medium.com%2Fmesmerized-by-the-murmuration-on-human-potential-f4c9ffe06ffa&group=world - As Jon Alexander and Arian Conrad write here, we have to find the narratives that matter to us, where WE is the citizens. Other thinkers like Jose Ramos write along the same line: - https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Foff-planet.medium.com%2Fdiscovering-the-narratives-that-matter-to-us-327958a2daec&group=world

    1. “Cells may not know civilization is possible.

      for - quote - multiscale competency architecture - quote - book - Emergent Strategy - Adrienne Maree Brown

      • Cells may not know civilization is possible.
      • They don’t amass as many units as they can sign up to be the same.
      • No — they grow until
        • they split,
        • complexify.
        • Then they interact and intersect and discover their purpose
          • I am a lung cell!
          • I am a tongue cell!
        • and they serve it. And they die.
      • And what emerges from these cycles are
        • complex organisms,
        • systems,
        • movements,
        • societies.

      adjacency - between - Adrienne Maree Brown quote - Michael Levin - adjacency statement - Adrienne's quote is the subsumed under Levin's term of multi-scale competency architecture (MSCA)

    2. Emergent Strategy, Adrienne Maree Brown

      follow up - book - Emergent Strategy - author - Adrienne Maree Brown

    1. Hamlet's Hit Points

      Kniha R. D. Lawse, rozebírající Hamleta a další díla z hlediska dramatického vyznění

    1. Butno matter how the form may vary, the fact that an organism hasconscious experience at all means, basically, that there is somethingit is like to be that organism

      for - earth species project - ESP - Earth Species Project - Aza Raskin - Ernest Becker - Book - The Birth and Death of Meaning

      comment - what is it like to be that other organism? - Earth Species Project is trying to shed some light on that using machine learning processes to decode the communication signals of non-human species - https://jonudell.info/h/facet/?max=100&expanded=true&user=stopresetgo&exactTagSearch=true&any=earth++species+project - https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2FH9SvPs1cCds%2F&group=world

      - In Ernest Becker's book, The Birth and Death of Meaning, Becker provides a summary of the ego from a Freudian perspective that is salient to Nagel's work
          - The ego creates time and humans, occupying a symbolosphere are timebound creatures that create the sense of time to order sensations and perceptions
          - The ego becomes the central reference point for the construct of time
      - If the anthropocene is a problem
      - and we wish to migrate towards an ecological civilization in which there is greater respect for other species, 
          - a symbiocene
      - this means we need to empathize with other species 
      - If our species is timebound but the majority of other species are not, 
          - then we must bridge that large gap by somehow experiencing what it's like to be an X ( where X can be a bat or many other species)
      

      reference - interesting adjacencies emerging from reading a review of Ernest Becker's book: The Birth and Death of Meaning - https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.themortalatheist.com%2Fblog%2Fthe-birth-and-death-of-meaning-ernest-becker&group=world

    1. Inthe case of good books, the point is notto see how many of them you can getthrough, but rather how many can getthrough you—how many you can makeyour own

      This is not only a nice quote by itself, but seems to be saying something deeper to me about productivity.

      There's a difference in productivity for it's own sake, but being both productive in the send of time spent efficiently and productive in the sense of producing something of greater value with your time than you might have spent doing something else which was less valuable, but which might still have been time well spent.

  5. Mar 2024
    1. temporal conscientization” (becoming conscious of historical

      for - definition - temporal conscientization - adjacency - temporal conscientization - Deep Humanity - poly-meta-perma-crisis - terror management - denial of death - Paolo Freire - denial of death - Ernest Becker - terror management - book - Critical Consciousness

      definition - temporal conscientization - introduced by Paolo Freire n his book, temporal conscientization means becoming conscious of historical change, our - past, -present and - futures - For people to intervene in the movement of history, - people need to understand - how they got to where they are now, - the era that they are coming from, but as well to understand - the movements and potentialities of change that are leading to different futures.

      adjacency - between - temporal conscientization - Deep Humanity - poly-meta-perma-crisis - terror management theory - denial of death - adjacency statement - Deep Humanity has always elevated the idea of knowing the past, present and future in order to frame meaning for navigating our future. - This is precisely the awareness of temporal conscientization. - Deep considerations of death, - and subsequently what meaning we can derive from life - is an integral part of the Deep Humanity exercise - A major theme of religions is the afterlife, or some continuation of consciousness after the process of death - In the context of temporal conscientization, - looking and - imagining - what our - individual and - collective future - looks like - the proposal of an afterlife is a terror management strategy to cope with our denial of death - Perhaps the emergence of the present poly-meta-perma-crisis is - a cultural indication to the collective intelligence of the human social superorganism that - the time has come to develop a mature theory of life and death that is - accessible to every member of our species so that - we can put the fragmenting, isolating existential question to rest once and for all

    1. for - adjacency - liberalism - ubiquity - invisibility - polycrisis - climate change - climate crisis - book - Liberalism and the Challenge of Climate Change

      summary - This is an insightful interview with Dr. Christopher Shaw as he discusses his book, Liberalism and the Challenge of Climate Change.

      adjacency - between - liberalism - ubiquity - invisibility - polycrisis - metaphor - fish in water, fish in the ocean - adjacency statement - Above all, this book points out that - liberalism is an idea that is - so ubiquitous and j - which everyone without exception is profoundly steeped within that, - like fish in water, a medium that is everywhere, the medium becomes invisible. - At the heart of - modernity's culture wars and - political polarization, - there is a kind of false dichotomy between - liberals and - conservatives, - as both are steeped in the worldview of liberalism - From the Stop Reset Go perspective, - Dr. Shaw's thesis aligns with - the Stop Reset Go Deep Humanity open source praxis, - whose essence is precisely to facilitate helping individuals to understand the powerful connection between - ubiquity and - invisibility. - via Common Human Denominators (CHD)

    1. Notice how you know where you are in the book by the distribution of weight in each hand, and the thickness of the page stacks between your fingers. Turn a page, and notice how you would know if you grabbed two pages together, by how they would slip apart when you rub them against each other.

      Go ahead and pick up a book. Open it up to some page. Notice how you know how much water is left, by how the weight shifts in response to you tipping it.

      References

      Victor, B. (2011). A brief rant on the future of interaction design. Tomado de https://worrydream.com/ABriefRantOnTheFutureOfInteractionDesign/

    1. Theindexer will want a feel, before they begin, for the concepts that willneed to be flagged, or taxonomized with subheadings. They mightskim the book – reading it in full but at a canter – before tackling itproperly with the software open. Or they may spend a while, as apreliminary, with the book’s introduction, paying attention to itschapter outline – if it has one – to gain a sense of what to look outfor. Often, having reached the end of the book, the indexer will returnto the first few chapters, going over them again now that they havegained a conceptual mapping of the work as a whole.

      It's no wonder that Mortimer J. Adler was able to write such a deep analysis of reading in How to Read a Book after having spent so much time indexing the ideas behind The Great Books of the Western World.

      Indexing requires a solid inspectional read at minimum, but will often go deeper into contexts which require at least some analytical reading. To produce the Syntopicon, one must go even further into analytical reading to provide the proper indexing of ideas so that they may be sub-categorized and used for deeper analysis for things such as comparison and contrast of those ideas.

  6. Feb 2024
    1. ‘Blessed Lord, which hast caused al holy Scriptures to bee written forour learnyng; graunte us that we maye in such wise heare them,read, marke, learne, and inwardly digeste them.’2

      quote from:<br /> The Booke of the Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments (London: 1549), sig. B iiv.

    2. What happens to the page layout now that the book is beingused as a container for many discrete pieces of information, ratherthan for a single, continuous narrative?
    1. Isidore of Seville [7th century CE] (Etymologies, Book 12, 7:26): The pelican [pelicanus] is an Egyptian bird inhabiting the solitary places of the river Nile, whence it takes its name, for Egypt is called canopos. It is reported, if it may be true, that this bird kills its offspring, mourns them for three days, and finally wounds itself and revives its children by sprinkling them with its own blood. - [Barney, Lewis, et. al. translation]

      Despite the now commonly accepted etymology of pelican stemming from the Greek pelekys or pelekus meaning "ax", a referent to the bird's large beak, in Etymologies (book 12, 7:26) Isidore of Seville says it "takes its name for Egypt which is called canopos."

      question: There is a thing called a canoptic jar (from Egypt), is it possible that trade via these jars caused the ancients to associate Egypt with them, or is there a separate etymology at play?

    1. Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln (face rubbed), in mitre and red cope, with crosier, seated on left speaks to a seated group of five people, mostly women. Tree on right; large bird with long beak at top.

      image of MS 522 f1r Lambeth Palace Library

      Folio 1 of MS 522 of Château d'amour

      Close up of inset image via link close up of image on folio 1r of Château d'amour

      Book and images mentioned in Chapter 2 of @Duncan2022 Index, A History of the

  7. Jan 2024
    1. With your Kokuyo Binder- do you know of a way to bind relatively large numbers of pages together? I want to use something like this as my commonplace book and archive as I go, but once I get enough archived on a given subject, I'd like to bind it as a sort of compendium. Does that seem possible with these or are they not good for larger numbers of pages?

      reply to u/modspyder at https://www.reddit.com/r/commonplacebook/comments/18fbwqx/comment/ko8bksm/

      The small plastic binder I use comfortably holds 50 pages, but has room for maybe 25 more (though not 50). You could use several of them for binding together groups of pages like that. Searching around might reveal larger ring binders here if you want larger books.

      For larger quantities:

      You can use book rings (sold in various sizes) or even binder clips to hold these sheets together in batches, but with the ability to remove them or add sheets later.

      File folders might be a useful option too for holding things together in categories.

      With some inexpensive book binder's glue and cardboard you could bind together much larger numbers of sheets into custom books for yourself. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nivNPCoAHcM is a good basic primer, but you could also do more complicated bindings and covers or have pages bound at FedEx/Kinkos or other higher end professional binders depending on your need and ultimate budget. For this the sky may be the limit, though anything over 1000 pages may be getting awfully bulky.

    1. “The last thing in the world I’d want to write about is this place,” Vivian said at the door. “I can’t imagine anything more boring.”

      This idea that the CIA is so boring. Parking. Anodyne questions. Typical corporate America shit.

    1. for - interview - author - Tristan Snell - book - Taking down Trump - https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/756546/taking-down-trump-by-tristan-snell/

      summary - Snell is a lawyer who successfully prosecuted Trump, representing a class action lawsuit by the former students of Trump University - The book documents how he was able to successfully prosecute Trump and the challenges him and his team had to overcome - It provides a fascinating picture of how pathological elites operate, and how a perversion of power allows elites to effectively by silence, until the damage inflicted is so severe that - It sheds light on how corruption cultivated in business can scale to become political fascism. This is how fascism develops, silently and incrementally, until it becomes too late and entire society then pays - In the age of elites, Donald Trump, who comes from the elite class himself, is able to distort truth to such an extent that the very class that his class (elites) exploits the most (the working class) are convinced that he is their savior. - It also shows the dynamics of how power corrupts. Ideological synergy enables his allies to look the other way and ignore the extreme ethical baggage he carries, reinforcing the cliche - "the means justifies the ends"

    1. book aims of education

      for - book - Aims of Education

      Followup - book - Aims of Education - author: Alfred North Whitehead - a collection of papers and thoughts on the critical role of education in determining the future course of civilization

      epiphany - adjacency between - Lifework and evolutionary nature of the individual - - people-centered Indyweb -- Alfred North Whitehead's ideas and life history - adjacency statement - Listening to the narrator speaking about Whitehead's work from a historical perspective brought up the association with the Indyweb's people-centered design - This is especially salient given that Whitehead felt education played such a critical role in determining the future course of humanity - If Whitehead were alive, he would likely appreciate the Indyweb design because it is based on the human being as a process rather than a static entity, - hence renaming human being to human INTERbeCOMing, a noun replaced by a verb - Indyweb's people-centered design and default temporal, time-date recording of ideas as they occur provides inherent traceability to the evolution of an individual's consciousness - Furthermore, since it is not only people-centered but also INTERPERSONAL, we can trace the evolution of ideas within a social network. - Since individual and collective intelligence are both evolutionary and intertwingled, they are both foundational in Indyweb's design ethos. - In particular, Indyweb frames the important evolutionary process of - having a conversation with your old self - as a key aspect of the evolutionary growth of the individual's consciousness

    1. Annotations are on the Transcript tab of this web page

      Abstract

      Last month, it seemed like Moms for Liberty, the infamous political group behind the recent push for book bans in schools across the country, might be on the wane. In November, a series of Moms for Liberty endorsed candidates lost school board elections, and in local district elections, the group took hit after hit. In Iowa, 12 of 13 candidates backed by the Moms were voted out, and in Pennsylvania, Democrats won against at least 11 of their candidates. But recently, Moms for Liberty co-founder Tiffany Justice claimed in an interview, "we're just getting started," boasting about the group's plans to ramp up efforts in 2024.

      • for: elephants in the room - financial industry at the heart of the polycrisis, polycrisis - key role of finance industry, Marjorie Kelly, Capitalism crisis, Laura Flanders show, book - Wealth Supremacy - how the Extractive Economy and the Biased Rules of Captialism Drive Today's Crises

      • Summary

        • This talk really emphasizes the need for the Stop Reset Go / Deep Humanity Wealth to Wellth program
        • Interviewee Marjorie Kelly started Business Ethics magainze in 1987 to show the positive side of business After 30 years, she found that it was still tinkering at the edges. Why? - because it wasn't addressing the fundamental issue.
        • Why there hasn't been noticeable change in spite of all these progressive efforts is because we avoided questioning the fundamental assumption that maximizing returns to shareholders and gains to shareholder portfolios is good for people and planet.**** It turns out that it isn't. It's fundamentally bad for civilization and has played a major role in shaping today's polycrisis.
        • Why wealth supremacy is entangled with white supremacy
        • Financial assets are the subject
          • Equity and bonds use to be equal to GDP in the 1950s.
          • Now it's 5 times as much
        • Financial assets extracts too much from common people
        • Question: Families are swimming in debt. Who owns all this financial debt? ...The financial elites do.
      • meme

        • wealth supremacy and white supremacy are entangled
    1. Which is exactly what you do in the book. And what did you find? - So what I do, I take apart the operating system of capitalism, which is, and I look at seven myths, really that drive it.
      • for: book - wealth supremacy - 7 myths, 7 myths of Capitalism, capital bias, definition - capital bias

      • DESCRIPTION: 7 MYTHS of CAPITALISM

        • The Myth of Maximization
          • example of absurdity of maximization
            • Bill Gates had $10 billion. Then he invested it and got $300 billion. There's no limit to how much wealth an individual can accumulate. It is absurd.
        • Myth of the Income Statement
          • Gains to capital called profit is always to be increased and
          • Gains of labor is called an expense, is always to be decreased
        • Myth of Materiality (also called capital bias)
        • definition: capital bias
          • If something impacts capital, it matters
          • If something impacts society or ecology, it doesn't matter
        • With the capital bias, only accumulating more capital matters. NOTHING ELSE MATTERS. This is how most accountants and CFO's view the world.
      • quote: Laura Flanders

        • The capital is what matters. We're aiming for more capital and nothing else really matters. That's the operating system of the economy. So the real world is immaterial to this world of wealth as held in stocks and shares and financial instruments.
    1. The intellectual dark web (IDW) is a term used to describe some commentators who oppose identity politics, political correctness, and cancel culture in higher education and the news media within Western countries.