5 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2021
    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Martin Gardner </span> in Hexaflexagons, Probability Paradoxes & the Tower of Hanoi in Chapter 11 Memorizing Numbers (<time class='dt-published'>04/02/2021 14:31:10</time>)</cite></small>

    1. A reproduction of Carroll’snotes on his number alphabet will be found in Warren Weaver’s arti-cle “Lewis Carroll: Mathematician,” inScientific Americanfor April1956.)

      I need to track down this reference and would love to see what Weaver has to say about the matter.

      Certainly Weaver would have spoken of this with Claude Shannon (or he'd have read it).

    1. My "Memoria Technica" is a modification of Gray's;

      Because of the likelihood that Gray is a misspelling, it is most likely the case that he's referring here to Richard Grey)'s method from the book Memoria Technica, or, a New Method of Artificial Memory (1730).

      Could they have known each other personally? Might be worth checking his massive correspondence.

    2. To help himself to remember dates, he devised a system of mnemonics, which he circulated among his friends. As it has never been published, and as some of my readers may find it useful, I reproduce it here. My "Memoria Technica" is a modification of Gray's; but, whereas he used both consonants and vowels to represent digits, and had to content himself with a syllable of gibberish to represent the date or whatever other number was required, I use only consonants, and fill in with vowels ad libitum, and thus can always manage to make a real word of whatever has to be represented.

      Lewis Carroll aka Dodgson never published his own version of his memory system.

      N.B. He indicates here that he filled in his vowels ad libitum which is now the common practice for the phonetic major system. As this indicates he never published it, it then becomes a question as to whether or not he was the originator of this part of the technique or if it was later re-invented/discovered by others.

  2. Sep 2020
    1. through the window, to take his portmanteau

      How close were Wilkie Collins and Lewis Carroll? If I'm not mistaken, Carroll originally used this phrase in Through the Looking Glass which was published around the same time as The Moonstone.

      As Humpty Dumpty says, the portmanteau could be interpreted as "two meanings packed up into one word" . With Godfrey giving Cuff the keys to the portmanteau, it may allude to clues hidden in words with double meanings.

      Either way, Carroll and Collins must've been on a lot of the good stuff.