49 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2022
    1. Nigg said it might help me grasp what’s happening if we compare our rising attention problems to our rising obesity rates. Fifty years ago there was very little obesity, but today it is endemic in the western world. This is not because we suddenly became greedy or self-indulgent. He said: “Obesity is not a medical epidemic – it’s a social epidemic. We have bad food, for example, and so people are getting fat.” The way we live changed dramatically – our food supply changed, and we built cities that are hard to walk or cycle around, and those changes in our environment led to changes in our bodies. We gained mass, en masse. Something similar, he said, might be happening with the changes in our attention.

      Obesity is a social epidemic and not a medical one. It's been caused by dramatic shifts in our surroundings in the past century. Food is cheaper and more abundant. It's also been heavily processed and designed to be fattier, saltier, and higher in carbohydrates. There is less encouragement to physically move our own bodies whether by walking, bicycling, running, etc. Our cities have become more driver focused. Our lives have become much more sedentary.

  2. Nov 2021
    1. How much protein should you get for breakfast? A common suggestion for protein intake for each meal is around 25-30 grams of protein.  A 2010 review article (5) suggests consuming 25-30 grams of protein at each meal can help prevent muscle loss.  This effect has been shown in the elderly, which is at risk for losing muscle mass and strength, but also younger adults. Therefore, every adult age could benefit from eating around 25-30 grams of protein at each meal. Shifting intake of protein, not necessarily increasing the amount, could help optimize muscle growth and get the benefits of satiety from a higher protein meal.if(typeof __ez_fad_position != 'undefined'){__ez_fad_position('div-gpt-ad-caloriesecrets_net-box-4-0')}; For example, a typical adult may get 90 total grams of protein through the day: about 10 grams for breakfast, 20 grams for lunch and about 60 grams of protein for dinner. Instead, some researchers are proposing people get around 30 grams at each meal instead of loading up on protein for the dinner meal.
  3. Sep 2021
    1. My father has been exploring brain chemistry and neural connections since the 70s in his medical practice as a paediatrician. His children have been his experimental laboratory. A conversation with my father is an adventure down the rabbit hole.

      This is what he was sharing with me this past weekend. I must have learned my love of books and magazines from my father.

      My father’s interest in Lewis Carroll is related to migraine headaches, which is what my father was treating in adult patients, as he was exploration a correlation between diet and brain chemistry.

  4. Jul 2021
  5. Apr 2021
    1. Get your fats via healthy midday snacks. Go for or seed-based crackers (we like Flackers) with guacamole or nut butters. For quick bites: olives, olive tapenade, or a handful of nuts. Or pair your hummus with some sliced red pepper, jicama, celery, and sulforaphane-rich cauliflower and broccoli (which can increase insulin sensitivity).
    2. Besides helping you stay regular and feeding the good bugs in your gut microbiome, fiber can also improve glycemic control. Research shows that diets rich in fiber are associated with lower post-meal glucose and insulin levels and lower glucose variability. One small study of people with Type 2 diabetes found that those who ate about 50 grams of fiber every day had lower glucose responses and less variability than those who ate an identical amount of calories but only about 15 grams of fiber every day.  
    3. Don’t ruin your salad. Salads should be the ultimate metabolically friendly choice on the menu, but beware of common mix-ins like dried fruit, crunchy toppings like croutons or fried tortilla strips, and sugar- or honey-filled dressings could send your post-meal glucose soaring. (Same goes for veggie-rich soups with glucose spikers like rice, noodles, and pasta—not to mention the bread and crackers on the side.)
  6. Mar 2021
  7. Feb 2021
    1. Following food author Michael Pollan’s simple advice about choosing a diet may be the best way forward: “Eat food. Not too much. Mainly plants.”

      Probably the best general health advice out there.

  8. Jan 2021
  9. Nov 2020
    1. Acai Berry Pulp/Skin/Puree Powder

      I found a study on acai and blood sugar, but they used healthy overweight subjects. The relative reduction in postprandial glucose was substantial. However, since the subjects' baseline fasting glucose was normal, the drop was not significant. We have every reason to think that fasting blood sugar would be reduced in diabetic subjects.

    2. Baobab Fruit Powder, Dried

      I was unable to find a study on baobab on diabetes or metabolic syndrome. However, given the effectiveness of amla, curcumin, and acai, it is likely effective. There is also some evidence for many other antioxidant sources, which backs up the idea that any source will do.

    3. Sumac Bran, Raw

      I've found one study on sumac for type 2 diabetes. There seems to be two separate write-ups on the same data.

      Oddly, 3 grams sumac did not perform as well as 3 grams amla. I can think of several possible explanations. The most likely explanation is that they used the whole grain rather than the bran. I assume the grain is what's used traditionally, but I'm having difficulty finding information about this. The bran has over 3 times the ORAC compared to the whole grain. It's likely that the bran is both hard to find and expensive.

    1. Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening reaction that results in difficulty breathing, swelling in the mouth and throat, decreased blood pressure, shock, or even death. Milk, eggs, wheat, soy, fish, shellfish, peanuts, and tree nuts are the most likely to trigger this type of response.

      Symptoms of allergic reactions

    2. Possible symptoms include itchy skin, hives, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and nausea.

      Symptoms of an allergic reaction

  10. Oct 2020
    1. For Burger Patties8 ounces (225 grams) mushrooms 1 medium carrot 1 1/2 cups (85 grams) broccoli florets 1/4 medium onion 2 medium garlic cloves 2 tablespoons (30 grams) oil such as olive oil, avocado oil or grape seed, plus more for cooking 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon chili powder 3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt 1/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper 1 (15-ounce) can black beans, drained and rinsed 1/3 cup (35 grams) walnut halves (about 14 halves) 2 cups packed (85 grams) spinach leaves Handful tender fresh herbs like chives, parsley or cilantro (optional) 1/2 cup (100 grams) panko breadcrumbs 2 large eggs 1 tablespoon (15 grams) tomato paste 3/4 cup (115 grams) cooked brown rice Bread rolls, lettuce, tomato, cheese and favorite burger sauces

      Looks good. I will be using slightly crushed black.I'll use ground chickpea to thicken the water into a patty (along with the flax egg). I'll saok all ingredients in water for 24 hours. Then I'll remix and cook.

      I'll be cooking in a cylindrical contanter (inside pressure a cooker), then cutting it into burger slices. It will likely get stuck to the container, but I can't think of a surefire way to make it not stick given that it will start out as a soup that hardens. I could try a pre-cooked slice of something oily (such as oily bread, for example).Lining the bottom of the container with that could do the trick. I'll just cut around the sides, then pull out the cylinder.

      EDIT: I just realized I can use a cooking cylinder. It has no bottom, so I'd just have to lift it up, cut around the edge, and push it out. I'll make a thick sludge prior to cooking (by using flax), to minimize leakage. I'll place it inside a bowel with a small pool of oil. Even if it sticks, it won't matter because I can neatly tear or cut both dimensions (bottom and sides) without deforming my patty block.

    1. Ingredients10-12 oz. of tomato paste10-12 oz. of tomato paste1/8 - 1/3 cup of apple cider vinegar or white vinegar add 1/8 cup first - the full 1/3 makes a tangier ketchup (which we like). If you want more tang, add a little more at a time. White vinegar can also be used.1/8 - 1/3 cup of apple cider vinegar or white vinegar add 1/8 cup first - the full 1/3 makes a tangier ketchup (which we like). If you want more tang, add a little more at a time. White vinegar can also be used.1 tablespoon of sugar1 tablespoon of sugar1/2 teaspoon salt1/2 teaspoon salt1/4 teaspoon black pepper1/4 teaspoon black pepper1/2 teaspoon mustard powder1/2 teaspoon mustard powder1/2 teaspoon dried oregano1/2 teaspoon dried oregano1/2 teaspoon cayenne1/2 teaspoon cayenne1/2 teaspoon onion powder1/2 teaspoon onion powder1/2 teaspoon of garlic powder1/2 teaspoon of garlic powder1/4 teaspoon celery salt1/4 teaspoon celery saltpinch of ground all spicepinch of ground all spice

      Tasty! I trippled the sweetener content to nearly match comercial ketchups (using erithritol, stevia extraxt, and monk fruit extract).

    1. Breads containing 30% and muffins containing 50% flaxseed were rated better than their counterparts regarding overall acceptability scores.

      That is a surprisingly high level. It's worth noting that 30% is the highest level tested in bread, so the highest level tested was the best. Given that they tested muffins up to 66%, it seems plausible that the 50% found optimal in muffins may also be optimal in bread.

  11. Sep 2020
  12. Aug 2020
  13. Jul 2020
  14. Jun 2020
  15. May 2020
  16. Mar 2019
    1. Each test salad contained 48 g spinach (Spinach; Dole Food Company), 48 g romaine (Hearts of Romaine; Fresh Express), 66 g shredded carrots (Shredded Carrots; Dole Food Company), and 85 g cherry tomatoes

      This doesn't sound like adequate protein to stimulate bile. Therefore, this study does not elucidate whether fat is necessary for lipid soluble nutrient absorption. Nevertheless, it does show that fat is sufficient.

    1. The amount of dietary fat consumed with the hot meal (3 or 36 g) did not affect the increases in plasma concentrations of vitamin E (20% increase with the low-fat spread and 23% increase with the high-fat spread) or alpha- and beta-carotene (315% and 139% with the low-fat spread and 226% and 108% with the high-fat spread).

      This is some of the better evidence that fat is not necessary for lipid bioavailability. I'm trying to find out if bile alone is sufficient.

    1. A single-dose bioavailability study was performed using three commercially available milks (unfortified whole milk and whole and skimmed milk fortified with vitamins A and E).

      They also gave 10 biscuits (full text). This could potentially destroy the entire premise of the study. They estimate that the entire meal contained between 6 and 20 grams of fat, depending on which milk was given. Skimmed milk contains 0.2% fat, so 430ml provides less than a gram. Therefore, the skimmed milk group obtained most fat from the biscuits. Six grams is certainly enough to substantially enable bioavailability.

  17. Jan 2019
    1. Global burden & epidemiology of adolescent nutrition: issues and risk factors

      Learn more about this topic in this Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism article by Parul Christian. More about the journal here.

  18. Dec 2018
    1. More specific for those following a ketogenic diet, to date, six studies have compared breath acetone levels with blood b-hydroxybutyrate levels and have found a strong correlation (R2= 0.77) (8). One study in particular directly compared blood, breath, and urine samples of 12 healthy individuals undergoing an experimental protocol designed to induce a state of ketosis. The results demonstrated that plasma acetoacetate was best predicted by breath acetone (6). Therefore, it appears that breath acetone assessments are a fast and accurate way to test for the degree of ketosis.
    2. When following a ketogenic diet, acetyl-CoA is produced in the liver from the breakdown of fat and is used to produce acetoacetate, one of three ketone bodies.  From there, acetoacetate can be converted to the other two “ketone bodies”, b-hydroxybutyrate and acetone.  While b-hydroxybutyrate is tested via blood meters, acetone actually diffuses into the lungs and can be measured by testing exhaled breath (7)! Acetone is a byproduct of fat metabolism and is present in the breath of all humans but in different concentrations.
  19. Dec 2017
    1. Making things even more maddeningly complicated, seemingly similar foods can differ wildly in nutrition profile. A local, farm-fresh carrot will probably be less diluted in its nutrients than a mass-produced baby carrot that's been bagged in the grocery store. A hamburger at a fast-food restaurant will have different fat and salt content compared with one made at home. Even getting people to better report on every little thing they put into their bodies can't completely address this variation.
    2. In a recent study published in the journal Cell, Israeli scientists tracked 800 people over a week, continuously monitoring their blood sugar levels to see how they responded to the same foods. Every person seemed to respond wildly differently, even to identical meals, "suggesting that universal dietary recommendations may have limited utility," the researchers wrote. "It's now clear that the impact of nutrition on health cannot be simply understood by assessing what people eat," said Rafael Perez-Escamilla, a professor of epidemiology and public health at Yale, "as this is strongly influenced by how the nutrients and other bioactive compounds derived from foods interact with the genes and the extensive gut microbiota that individuals have."
    3. I asked 8 researchers why the science of nutrition is so messy. Here’s what they said.
  20. Nov 2017
    1. Vegans had the highest intakes of fibre, vitamin B1, folate, vitamin C, vitamin E, magnesium and iron, and the lowest intakes of retinol, vitamin B12, vitamin D, calcium and zinc.

      Of note, vegans consume more iron. Since non-heme iron absorption is regulated (i.e. titrated in proportion to stores), this does not mean vegans absorb more iron. Importantly, however, it does translate into no greater risk of anemia for vegans as compared to meat eaters.

    1. This is a great article with crucial but very basic information that we can use, that also ensures any patient with no previous dietary knowledge will easily understand.

  21. Jun 2017
    1. Dogs received the test product as two meals per d, to provide their individual daily energy requirement according to the following equation: 95 kcal/kg body weight0·75 per d (397 kJ/kg body weight0·75 per d). During the adaptation phase (4–6 d), no samples of faeces or diet were collected to allow for complete transition of test product through the digestive tract. During the collection phase (7–11 d), faeces were collected daily, pooled for each dog and stored at −20°C prior to analysis. Food intakes and refusals were recorded daily.

      I never knew that dogs ate this stuff.

  22. Jul 2016
  23. Mar 2016
    1. Plantains are higher in starch than bananas, low in sugar and is similar to a potato in texture. Plantains have similar nutritive value as fresh bananas plus vitamin A, and are an excellent source of carbohydrates, according to the University of Florida Extension. Plantains are also a good source of vitamin C and are low in sodium and calories.

      Plantains are high in starch and low in sugar, but they are just as good for you as bananas, plus they are healthier! I love them!

  24. Feb 2016
  25. Sep 2015
    1. The benefits of increased consumption were greater for fruits than for vegetables and strongest for berries, apples/pears, tofu/soy, cauliflower, and cruciferous and green leafy vegetables. Increased satiety with fewer calories could be partly responsible for the beneficial effects of increasing fruit and vegetable intake. These findings may not be generalizable—nearly all the participants were well-educated white adults.