18 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2019
    1. Each test salad contained 48 g spinach (Spinach; Dole Food Company), 48 g romaine (Hearts of Romaine; Fresh Express), 66 g shredded carrots (Shredded Carrots; Dole Food Company), and 85 g cherry tomatoes

      This doesn't sound like adequate protein to stimulate bile. Therefore, this study does not elucidate whether fat is necessary for lipid soluble nutrient absorption. Nevertheless, it does show that fat is sufficient.

    1. The amount of dietary fat consumed with the hot meal (3 or 36 g) did not affect the increases in plasma concentrations of vitamin E (20% increase with the low-fat spread and 23% increase with the high-fat spread) or alpha- and beta-carotene (315% and 139% with the low-fat spread and 226% and 108% with the high-fat spread).

      This is some of the better evidence that fat is not necessary for lipid bioavailability. I'm trying to find out if bile alone is sufficient.

    1. A single-dose bioavailability study was performed using three commercially available milks (unfortified whole milk and whole and skimmed milk fortified with vitamins A and E).

      They also gave 10 biscuits (full text). This could potentially destroy the entire premise of the study. They estimate that the entire meal contained between 6 and 20 grams of fat, depending on which milk was given. Skimmed milk contains 0.2% fat, so 430ml provides less than a gram. Therefore, the skimmed milk group obtained most fat from the biscuits. Six grams is certainly enough to substantially enable bioavailability.

  2. Jan 2019
    1. Global burden & epidemiology of adolescent nutrition: issues and risk factors

      Learn more about this topic in this Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism article by Parul Christian. More about the journal here.

  3. Dec 2018
    1. More specific for those following a ketogenic diet, to date, six studies have compared breath acetone levels with blood b-hydroxybutyrate levels and have found a strong correlation (R2= 0.77) (8). One study in particular directly compared blood, breath, and urine samples of 12 healthy individuals undergoing an experimental protocol designed to induce a state of ketosis. The results demonstrated that plasma acetoacetate was best predicted by breath acetone (6). Therefore, it appears that breath acetone assessments are a fast and accurate way to test for the degree of ketosis.
    2. When following a ketogenic diet, acetyl-CoA is produced in the liver from the breakdown of fat and is used to produce acetoacetate, one of three ketone bodies.  From there, acetoacetate can be converted to the other two “ketone bodies”, b-hydroxybutyrate and acetone.  While b-hydroxybutyrate is tested via blood meters, acetone actually diffuses into the lungs and can be measured by testing exhaled breath (7)! Acetone is a byproduct of fat metabolism and is present in the breath of all humans but in different concentrations.
  4. Dec 2017
    1. Making things even more maddeningly complicated, seemingly similar foods can differ wildly in nutrition profile. A local, farm-fresh carrot will probably be less diluted in its nutrients than a mass-produced baby carrot that's been bagged in the grocery store. A hamburger at a fast-food restaurant will have different fat and salt content compared with one made at home. Even getting people to better report on every little thing they put into their bodies can't completely address this variation.
    2. In a recent study published in the journal Cell, Israeli scientists tracked 800 people over a week, continuously monitoring their blood sugar levels to see how they responded to the same foods. Every person seemed to respond wildly differently, even to identical meals, "suggesting that universal dietary recommendations may have limited utility," the researchers wrote. "It's now clear that the impact of nutrition on health cannot be simply understood by assessing what people eat," said Rafael Perez-Escamilla, a professor of epidemiology and public health at Yale, "as this is strongly influenced by how the nutrients and other bioactive compounds derived from foods interact with the genes and the extensive gut microbiota that individuals have."
    3. I asked 8 researchers why the science of nutrition is so messy. Here’s what they said.
  5. Nov 2017
    1. Vegans had the highest intakes of fibre, vitamin B1, folate, vitamin C, vitamin E, magnesium and iron, and the lowest intakes of retinol, vitamin B12, vitamin D, calcium and zinc.

      Of note, vegans consume more iron. Since non-heme iron absorption is regulated (i.e. titrated in proportion to stores), this does not mean vegans absorb more iron. Importantly, however, it does translate into no greater risk of anemia for vegans as compared to meat eaters.

    1. This is a great article with crucial but very basic information that we can use, that also ensures any patient with no previous dietary knowledge will easily understand.

  6. Jun 2017
    1. Dogs received the test product as two meals per d, to provide their individual daily energy requirement according to the following equation: 95 kcal/kg body weight0·75 per d (397 kJ/kg body weight0·75 per d). During the adaptation phase (4–6 d), no samples of faeces or diet were collected to allow for complete transition of test product through the digestive tract. During the collection phase (7–11 d), faeces were collected daily, pooled for each dog and stored at −20°C prior to analysis. Food intakes and refusals were recorded daily.

      I never knew that dogs ate this stuff.

  7. Jul 2016
  8. Mar 2016
    1. Plantains are higher in starch than bananas, low in sugar and is similar to a potato in texture. Plantains have similar nutritive value as fresh bananas plus vitamin A, and are an excellent source of carbohydrates, according to the University of Florida Extension. Plantains are also a good source of vitamin C and are low in sodium and calories.

      Plantains are high in starch and low in sugar, but they are just as good for you as bananas, plus they are healthier! I love them!

  9. Feb 2016
  10. Sep 2015
    1. The benefits of increased consumption were greater for fruits than for vegetables and strongest for berries, apples/pears, tofu/soy, cauliflower, and cruciferous and green leafy vegetables. Increased satiety with fewer calories could be partly responsible for the beneficial effects of increasing fruit and vegetable intake. These findings may not be generalizable—nearly all the participants were well-educated white adults.