10 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2021
    1. Get your fats via healthy midday snacks. Go for or seed-based crackers (we like Flackers) with guacamole or nut butters. For quick bites: olives, olive tapenade, or a handful of nuts. Or pair your hummus with some sliced red pepper, jicama, celery, and sulforaphane-rich cauliflower and broccoli (which can increase insulin sensitivity).
    2. Besides helping you stay regular and feeding the good bugs in your gut microbiome, fiber can also improve glycemic control. Research shows that diets rich in fiber are associated with lower post-meal glucose and insulin levels and lower glucose variability. One small study of people with Type 2 diabetes found that those who ate about 50 grams of fiber every day had lower glucose responses and less variability than those who ate an identical amount of calories but only about 15 grams of fiber every day.  
    3. Don’t ruin your salad. Salads should be the ultimate metabolically friendly choice on the menu, but beware of common mix-ins like dried fruit, crunchy toppings like croutons or fried tortilla strips, and sugar- or honey-filled dressings could send your post-meal glucose soaring. (Same goes for veggie-rich soups with glucose spikers like rice, noodles, and pasta—not to mention the bread and crackers on the side.)
  2. Dec 2020
    1. For those awash in anxiety and alienation, who feel that everything is spinning out of control, conspiracy theories are extremely effective emotional tools. For those in low status groups, they provide a sense of superiority: I possess important information most people do not have. For those who feel powerless, they provide agency: I have the power to reject “experts” and expose hidden cabals. As Cass Sunstein of Harvard Law School points out, they provide liberation: If I imagine my foes are completely malevolent, then I can use any tactic I want.

      Underlying emotional drivers of Trump supporters, conspiracy theorists, and Republican psychology

    2. You can’t argue people out of paranoia. If you try to point out factual errors, you only entrench false belief. The only solution is to reduce the distrust and anxiety that is the seedbed of this thinking. That can only be done first by contact, reducing the social chasm between the members of the epistemic regime and those who feel so alienated from it. And second, it can be done by policy, by making life more secure for those without a college degree.

      Solutions to divided political landscape -- it can't be done head-on just by winning arguments through logic -- but instead will require community work, personal relationships, and educational policies

    1. The #1 company-killer is lack of market. Andy puts it this way: When a great team meets a lousy market, market wins. When a lousy team meets a great market, market wins. When a great team meets a great market, something special happens.
    2. And when you have a great market, the team is remarkably easy to upgrade on the fly. This is the story of search keyword advertising, and Internet auctions, and TCP/IP routers. Conversely, in a terrible market, you can have the best product in the world and an absolutely killer team, and it doesn't matter -- you're going to fail.

      Marc Andressen on what's important to start-up success

    3. In a great market -- a market with lots of real potential customers -- the market pulls product out of the startup

      Marc Andressen on biggest drivers of start-up success

    1. productivity gains for our highest value workers has been immense. The typical time-sucks and distractions of in-office work have been eliminated, as have their personal time investments like physically visiting the grocery store or running errands. Mental focus on productive efforts is near constant. Perhaps most importantly, work *travel* is not happening. Valuable collaborations with colleagues, customers, regulators or other partner companies aren’t delayed by the vagaries of the various groups’ availability to meet in person, navigating being in different cities, flights, hotels, etc. Collaboration happens as soon as you have the idea to meet via Zoom. And a lot *more* collaboration happens as a result. It may be lower productivity collaboration than meeting in person around a whiteboard (maybe), but the sheer quantity of it means on net there’s perhaps been a boom in cross-pollination of ideas

      Benefits of remote working, according to one executive

    1. The last several years, Mr. Obama says, have made it clear that “the normative glue that holds us together — a lot of those common expectations and values have weakened, have frayed in ways that de Tocqueville anticipated” and that “atomization and loneliness and the loss of community” have made our democracy vulnerable.

      Drivers of the current state of democracy and psychology of America.

      A view that is very similar to David Brooks'.