1,311 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Ball. P. (2020) Pandemic science and politics.. Retrieved from: chrome-extension://bjfhmglciegochdpefhhlphglcehbmek/pdfjs/web/viewer.html?file=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.thelancet.com%2Faction%2FshowPdf%3Fpii%3DS0140-6736%252820%252931594-4

  2. Jan 2021
    1. He attributes his longevity to being an avid reader, his spirituality, diet, frequent exercise, steadfast persistence and discipline.

      104-year-old PhD student advices to:

      • eat a lot of fruits
      • take cold showers
      • have some time to walk around and think
      • pay attention to discipline
      • study, study, study
    1. Science says the risk of transmission outdoors is roughly 20 times lower than it is inside.Even a faint breeze helps to disperse most virus particles that hang in the air.The risk is low, but it's not zero.
    1. Despite some implementation challenges, patient portals have allowed millions of patients to access to their medical records, read physicians’ notes, message providers, and contribute valuable information and corrections.

      I wonder if patients have edit - or at least, flag - information in their record?

  3. Dec 2020
    1. Bu Experts {@BU Experts} (2020) How can we navigate daily life during the pandemic? #Publichealth expert & epidemiologist @EpiEllie will be on @reddit_AMA this Thursday (8/27) at 12pm ET to answer all of your #COVID19-related questions. She'll discuss how to safely see friends and family, travel & more. @BUSPH. Twitter. Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/BUexperts/status/1297932614909792258

    1. People who think that racial differences are all biological might say that all these non-White groups have suffered so much excess death because of that bottom circle, because of greater biological susceptibility.  Recent studies have evaluated this hypothesis and found that it’s not true.  Instead the answer is simpler: Black and Latino/a people in particular are dying of COVID-19 at such staggering rates because they are more likely to be exposed to the virus in infectious settings, particularly workplaces.
    1. When they did pay attention, they invariably blamed the victims — their “unhealthy” behaviors and diets, their genes, the under-resourced neighborhoods they “chose” to live in and the low-paying jobs they “chose” to work. Their chronic illnesses were seen as failures of personal responsibility. Their shorter life expectancy was written off to addiction and the myth of “black-on-black” violence. Many of those arguments were legacies of the slave and Jim Crow eras, when the white medical and science establishment promoted the idea of innate Black inferiority and criminality to rationalize systems built on servitude and segregation.

      Is this an example of de jure or de facto racism and discrimination? Explain your thinking.

    2. public health experts mostly ignored the disparities

      Who do you think these experts were? How might that have changed?

    1. Evidence and experience suggest that in pandemic phase 6 (increased and sustained transmission in the general population), aggressive interventions to isolate patients and quarantine contacts, even if they are the first patients detected in a community, would probably be ineffective, not a good use of limited health resources, and socially disruptive.

      Ontario going in lockdown after the 26 December.

    2. Field studies coordinated by WHO will be needed to assess virus transmission characteristics, amplifying groups (e.g., children vs. adults), and attack and death rates. Information on these factors will be needed urgently at the onset of a pandemic because the pandemic subtype may behave differently than previous pandemic or seasonal strains. Such studies will also be needed throughout the pandemic period to determine if these factors are changing and, if so, to make informed decisions regarding public health response measures, especially those that are more costly or disruptive.

      Public Health Ontario are you following this? If this is not the case the entire "brain trust" should summarily dismissed.

    1. blue light has been found to have the strongest impact on your natural production of melatonin, filtering it out when you’re using devices at night can make it easier to fall asleep, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology. But even here, experts see a more mundane connection between devices and comfort: “Most of the negative impact of electronics on sleep and on your circadian clock is not due to the light. It’s due to the fact that these things are engineered to keep you awake and entertained and engaged in what you’re doing for an extended period of time,”

      Finding it hard to sleep might be either because of the blue light or the psychological effect of screens on us

    2. Reynolds encourages following the 20-20-20 rule: “Take a 20-second break to view something 20 feet away every 20 minutes.”

      20-20-20 rule (screen-free break technique)

    3. The American Academy of Ophthalmology asserts that dry eyes are more likely to be the result of decreased blinking. The AAO asserts that people blink 15 times per minute in normal circumstances (“normal” being relative, here) but only five to seven times per minute while staring at a screen. Solutions for preventing dry eyes can be as simple as reminding yourself to blink, or using artificial tear drops throughout your day as a preventive measure. It’s also possible that you’re blinking even less if your superclose to your screen.

      The true reason of dry eyes: rare blinking

    1. ReconfigBehSci {@SciBeh} (2020) The pandemic proves we all should know ‘psychological first aid.’ Here are the basics. /lifestyle/wellness/pandemic-psychological-first-aid-anxiety/2020/09/21/7c68d746-fc23-11ea-9ceb-061d646d9c67_story.html?tid=ss_tw. Twitter. Retrieved from: https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1308461925785837573

    1. Adopting measures to protect the vulnerable should be the central aim of public health responses to COVID-19.

      Public health departments world wide are failing.

    2. Current lockdown policies are producing devastating effects on short and long-term public health. The results (to name a few) include lower childhood vaccination rates, worsening cardiovascular disease outcomes, fewer cancer screenings and deteriorating mental health – leading to greater excess mortality in years to come, with the working class and younger members of society carrying the heaviest burden.

      The cure is worse than the disease.

  4. Nov 2020
    1. Study of patients attending a hospital-based obesity service shows no difference in weight loss between those under 60 years old and those from 60 to 78 years old The University of Warwick-led study conducted at University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire (UHCW) concludes that lifestyle changes to manage weight loss are effective in reducing obesity regardless of age Aims to dispel myths about effectiveness of weight loss in older people
      • Researchers studied 242 patients (under 60 and over 60 years old) who attended a weight-loss programme, most of them morbidly obese.
      • Results show no differences between age groups, proving that weight loss is as important for older people - even more so - as for younger people.
      • The programme was based on lifestyle-based changes - diet, physical activity and psychological support - and showed similar results regardless of age.
      • People often don’t care about weight loss in older people, and this study shows that it’s a very harmful perspective to adopt.
    1. Human ageing reversed in ‘Holy Grail’ study, scientists say
      • Clinical trial with 35 people over 64 years old shows that oxygen therapy can reverse two key indicators of biological ageing - telomere length, and senescent cells.
      • Telomeres are protective caps at the end of chromosomes, and senescent cells are malfunctioning, old cells.
      • Patients were placed in a pressurised chamber and given pure oxygen for 90 minutes a day, 5 days a week, for 3 months.
      • At the end, telomere length increased by 20% on average, and senescent cells were reduced by 37% - equivalent to a 25 years younger biological-cellular state.
      • The results are incomparable to lifestyle changes / exercise / diets, and researchers say it’s thanks to inducing cell regeneration through hypoxia (oxygen shortage).
    1. You can find your mental health triggers by beginning a thought diary

      A Thought Diary will help you find triggers when you write down things that went wrong and your accompanying feelings.

      An example would be how not meeting a deadline made you feel. What happened right after you realized you didn't meet the deadline?

    2. The best course of action is to discreetly arrange a one-to-one meeting, and sensitively explore how he’s feeling. It can be useful to write a wellness action plan together. This is a document in which the employee writes down information about the mental-health problems he’s experiencing, and what triggers exist in his workplace that contribute to these feelings. You can then draw up a strategy together for how to help him improve his mental health in the workplace, and make a list of actions that both of you can take to help get him back on track.

      A manager can sit down with the affected employee and write an wellness action plan. This will include:

      • Employee's mental health problems
      • Triggers within the workplace
      • A strategy to work together with employee to help them improve in the workplace.
      • A list of actions that can be done. e.g. Counseling, reduce working time, set limits with coworkers
    1. Refactoring at scale is challenging and a significant investment, so communicating the progress is important both from a business perspective but also as a motivational effect to developers. In this case we used a combination of complexity trend visualizations and Code Health Metric as shown in the preceding example.

      [[refactoring at scale]]

    1. 3. They're fighting misinformation.

      Agree or disagree with how they obtained info and what that means for digital rights; how much the Chinese government informed or not their people - this is what China did in terms of alerting their population of covid cases.

  5. Oct 2020
    1. We found that those medications, some of them at least 40 years past their manufacture date, still retained full potency
    1. Structural Racism as SDH: -Examples: 1) Home Health workers not eligible for paid leave causing disproportionate harm when injured 2) Nursing Home: SSA funded private long term care for the elderly and prohibited funding for institutions for AA individuals Laws 1) Often don't address root causes. For example, anti-discrimination laws legitimizes existing structures

    1. Daydreaming at Work Can Fuel Creativity

      Summary of the article:

      • We spend nearly half of each day daydreaming, and usually think that it’s a bad thing, but it turns out that highly demanding tasks make us daydream more.
      • It allows us to turn off our surroundings, and can be a way of imagining solutions to the problem at hand.
      • To find this out, researchers did two studies of employees and managers in South America, including mainly surveys about daydreaming.
      • Daydreaming turned out to happen more when the tasks required a lot of focus - it can boost creative problem-solving as long as we’re personally invested in our work.
      • However, for people who don’t identify with their work, daydreaming was linked to worse performance.