78 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2022
    1. https://thehill.com/homenews/senate/3641225-mcconnell-throws-shade-on-grahams-proposed-national-abortion-ban/

      I've recently run across a few examples of a pattern that should have a name because it would appear to dramatically change the outcomes. I'm going to term it "decisions based on possibilities rather than realities". It's seen frequently in economics and politics and seems to be a form of cognitive bias. People make choices (or votes) about uncertain futures, often when there is a confluence of fear, uncertainty, and doubt, and these choices are dramatically different than when they're presented with the actual circumstances in practice.

      A recent example was a story about a woman who was virulently pro-life who when presented with a situation required her to switch her position to pro-choice.

      Another relates to choices that people want to make about where their children might go to school versus where they actually send them, and the damage this does to public education.

      Let's start collecting examples of these quandaries at all levels of making choices in the real world.


      What is the relationship to this with the mental exercise of "descending into the particular"?

      Does this also potentially cause decision fatigue in cases of voting spaces when constituents are forced to vote for candidates on thousands of axes which they may or may not agree with?

  2. Aug 2022
    1. Anthony Costello. (2022, February 24). The risks of cognitive symptoms lasting at least 12 MONTHS were much higher in the infected group. 4.8x higher for fatigue, 3.2x for brain fog, 5.3x for poor memory, and an incredible 51x for altered taste and smell. We need data on children, but it could easily be similar. (17) https://t.co/JC1qYyW2Xc [Tweet]. @globalhlthtwit. https://twitter.com/globalhlthtwit/status/1496957266016313348

    1. What is not OK is what I perceive as the dominant attitude today: sell SciPy as a great easy-to-use tool for all scientists, and then, when people get bitten by breaking changes, tell them that it’s their fault for not having a solid maintenance plan for their code.
    1. I can't possibly keep updating software to deal with new JavaScript versions

      There's a fundamental misunderstanding (alternatively, misdirection) about what the source of breakage is. JS is not an SDK, and neither is the Web platform. Whatever worked in the old "JavaScript version" will work in the new one.

  3. Jun 2022
    1. Most of us are familiar with data visualization: charts, graphs, maps and animations that represent complex series of numbers. But visualization is not the only way to explain and present data. Some scientists are trying to sonify storms with global weather data. That could be easier to get a sense of interrelated storm dynamics by hearing them.

    1. By dropping or reducing or postponing the least importantparts, we can unblock ourselves and move forward even when timeis scarce.

      When working on a project, to stave off potential procrastination on finishing, one should focus on the minimum viable version and finish that. They can then progressively enhance portions and add on addition pieces which may be beneficial or even nice to have.

      Spending too much time on the things that sound nice or that one "might want to have" in the future will be the death of the thing.

      link to: - you ain't gonna need it - bikeshedding for procrastination

      questions: - Does the misinterpreted-effort hypothesis play a role in creating our procrastination and/or lead to decision fatigue?

    1. Asking them to do that time and time again all day long is a lost cause. McGonigal calls this willpower fatigue—in essence, our willpower fades the more we use it, so the more frequently we ask students to exert their willpower, the less energy they have to do it next time.
  4. Apr 2022
  5. Mar 2022
    1. front-end dumpster fires, where nothing that is over 18 months old, can build, compile or get support anymore. In my day job, I inherit "fun" tasks as 'get this thing someone glued together with webpack4 and frontend-du-jour to work with webpack5 in 2022
  6. Feb 2022
    1. Even though results of these studies are currently under intensescrutiny and have to be taken with a grain of salt (Carter andMcCullough 2014; Engber and Cauterucci 2016; Job, Dweck andWalton 2010), it is safe to argue that a reliable and standardisedworking environment is less taxing on our attention, concentration

      and willpower, or, if you like, ego. It is well known that decision-making is one of the most tiring and wearying tasks...

      Having a standardized and reliable working environment or even workflow can be less taxing on our attention, our concentration, and our willpower leaving more energy for making decisions and thinking which can have a greater impact.

      Does the fact that the relative lack of any decision making about what to see or read next seen in doomscrolling underlie some of the easily formed habit of the attention economy? Not having to actively decide what to read next combined with the random rewards of interesting tidbits creating a sense of flow is sapping not our mental energy, but our time. How can we better design against this?

  7. Jan 2022
    1. Townsend, L., Dyer, A. H., Naughton, A., Kiersey, R., Holden, D., Gardiner, M., Dowds, J., O’Brien, K., Bannan, C., Nadarajan, P., Dunne, J., Martin-Loeches, I., Fallon, P. G., Bergin, C., O’Farrelly, C., Cheallaigh, C. N., Bourke, N. M., & Conlon, N. (2021). Longitudinal Analysis of COVID-19 Patients Shows Age-Associated T Cell Changes Independent of Ongoing Ill-Health. Frontiers in Immunology, 12. https://www.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fimmu.2021.676932

  8. Dec 2021
  9. Nov 2021
  10. Oct 2021
  11. Sep 2021
  12. Aug 2021
  13. May 2021
  14. Apr 2021
    1. Nonverbal Mechanisms Predict Zoom Fatigue and Explain Why Women Experience Higher Levels than Men

      Training educators to acknowledge in themselves and others the process of zoom fatigue. Discussing the ratio and tolerance for zoom meetings, specially in mixed-gender classrooms. How many meetings? What is the policy for webcam use? A lot of these questions that could do wonders for people's mental health and learning process.

  15. Mar 2021
  16. Feb 2021
  17. Jan 2021
  18. Dec 2020
  19. Oct 2020
  20. Sep 2020
    1. This also informs how you should structure the decisions your stakeholders need to make. Say you have three things you need them to sign off on. If at all possible, put the most important (or riskiest) one first. The more decisions they have to make, the more conservative their decisions will get.
    2. If you have to get sign-off on something that might seem like a risk, think about scheduling that meeting for right after the stakeholders have had a nice meal.
    3. Decision fatigue describes a phenomenon where giving any real thought to a decision takes up energy.

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  21. Aug 2020
  22. Jul 2020
    1. So what Python currently does in issue depreciation warnings in the main program, but not in libraries and similar code. That may also be a reasonable way to limit the number of warnings while making sure deprecations don't go unnoticed (because that makes them useless).
  23. Jun 2020
  24. May 2020
    1. Many also question how the average user with little knowledge of the GDPR will react to being asked so many questions regarding consent. Will they be confused? Probably at first. It will be up to each business to create a consent form that is easy to understand, while being at the same time comprehensive and informative
    1. These options have almost deceptively similar wordings, with only subtle difference that is too hard to spot at a glance (takes detailed comparison, which is fatiguing for a user):

      1. can use your browser’s information for providing advertising services for this website and for their own purposes.
      2. cannot use your browser’s information for purposes other than providing advertising services for this website.

      If you rewrite them to use consistent, easy-to-compare wording, then you can see the difference a little easier:

      1. can use your browser’s information for providing advertising services for this website and for their own purposes.
      2. can use your browser’s information for providing advertising services for this website <del>and for their own purposes</del>.

      Standard Advertising Settings

      This means our ad partners can use your browser’s information for providing advertising services for this website and for their own purposes.

      Do Not Share My Information other than for ads on this website

      This means that our ad partners cannot use your browser’s information for purposes other than providing advertising services for this website.

  25. Apr 2020
    1. Currently, there is a high frequency of consent requests, privacy notices, cookie banners or cookie policies on every visited website. As a consequence of consent abuse, individuals resent a fatigue, resulting in consent loosing its purpose.
    2. This way, personal data is more effectively protected allowing individuals to focus on the risk involved in granting authorization for the use of their personal data and to take appropriate decisions based on the risk assessment. Consequently, the burden and confusion generated by systematic consent forms is constrained.

      Speaking of confusing, this paragraph is confusing and unclear.

      I think what they're basically saying is, don't ask for consent for every single little thing; only ask for consent when there is a real risk involved, so that people don't get desensitized to you asking for consent for every little thing, even things that they probably don't care about.

      Key word:

      systematic consents

    3. Third, the focus should be centered on improving transparency rather than requesting systematic consents. Lack of transparency and clarity doesn’t allow informed and unambiguous consent (in particular, where privacy policies are lengthy, complex, vague and difficult to navigate). This ambiguity creates a risk of invalidating the consent.

      systematic consents

    4. This will avoid overburdening with too much information every time they access a website, navigate across the internet, download an application, or purchase goods and/or services. This may result in a certain degree of consent fatigue.
  26. Mar 2020
    1. One MailChimp user tweeted this week that it seems the EU has "effectively killed newsletter with GDPR." He said he sent "get consent" emails through MailChimp and reported these numbers: 100 percent delivery rate, 37 percent open rate, 0 percent given consent.
    2. The re-consent campaigns have also been recognized as a practical pain from some in the thick of it. It's causing angst amongst email weary customers and prospects, consent fatigue and even some legal issues
    1. European Internet users are being subject to a lot of ‘consent theatre’ (ie noisy yet non-compliant cookie notices) — which in turn is causing knock-on problems of consumer mistrust and consent fatigue for all these useless pop-ups
  27. Sep 2018
    1. Deluged by apparent facts, arguments and counterarguments, our brains resort to the most obvious filter, the easiest cognitive shortcut for a social animal: We look to our peers, see what they believe and cheer along. As a result, open and participatory speech has turned into its opposite. Important voices are silenced by mobs of trolls using open platforms to hurl abuse and threats. Bogus news shared from one friend or follower to the next becomes received wisdom. Crucial pieces of information drown in so much irrelevance that they are lost. If books were burned in the street, we would be alarmed. Now, we are simply exhausted.
  28. Jan 2018