23 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2020
    1. So what Python currently does in issue depreciation warnings in the main program, but not in libraries and similar code. That may also be a reasonable way to limit the number of warnings while making sure deprecations don't go unnoticed (because that makes them useless).
  2. Jun 2020
  3. May 2020
    1. Many also question how the average user with little knowledge of the GDPR will react to being asked so many questions regarding consent. Will they be confused? Probably at first. It will be up to each business to create a consent form that is easy to understand, while being at the same time comprehensive and informative
    1. These options have almost deceptively similar wordings, with only subtle difference that is too hard to spot at a glance (takes detailed comparison, which is fatiguing for a user):

      1. can use your browser’s information for providing advertising services for this website and for their own purposes.
      2. cannot use your browser’s information for purposes other than providing advertising services for this website.

      If you rewrite them to use consistent, easy-to-compare wording, then you can see the difference a little easier:

      1. can use your browser’s information for providing advertising services for this website and for their own purposes.
      2. can use your browser’s information for providing advertising services for this website <del>and for their own purposes</del>.

      Standard Advertising Settings

      This means our ad partners can use your browser’s information for providing advertising services for this website and for their own purposes.

      Do Not Share My Information other than for ads on this website

      This means that our ad partners cannot use your browser’s information for purposes other than providing advertising services for this website.

  4. Apr 2020
    1. Currently, there is a high frequency of consent requests, privacy notices, cookie banners or cookie policies on every visited website. As a consequence of consent abuse, individuals resent a fatigue, resulting in consent loosing its purpose.
    2. This way, personal data is more effectively protected allowing individuals to focus on the risk involved in granting authorization for the use of their personal data and to take appropriate decisions based on the risk assessment. Consequently, the burden and confusion generated by systematic consent forms is constrained.

      Speaking of confusing, this paragraph is confusing and unclear.

      I think what they're basically saying is, don't ask for consent for every single little thing; only ask for consent when there is a real risk involved, so that people don't get desensitized to you asking for consent for every little thing, even things that they probably don't care about.

      Key word:

      systematic consents

    3. Third, the focus should be centered on improving transparency rather than requesting systematic consents. Lack of transparency and clarity doesn’t allow informed and unambiguous consent (in particular, where privacy policies are lengthy, complex, vague and difficult to navigate). This ambiguity creates a risk of invalidating the consent.

      systematic consents

    4. This will avoid overburdening with too much information every time they access a website, navigate across the internet, download an application, or purchase goods and/or services. This may result in a certain degree of consent fatigue.
  5. Mar 2020
    1. One MailChimp user tweeted this week that it seems the EU has "effectively killed newsletter with GDPR." He said he sent "get consent" emails through MailChimp and reported these numbers: 100 percent delivery rate, 37 percent open rate, 0 percent given consent.
    2. The re-consent campaigns have also been recognized as a practical pain from some in the thick of it. It's causing angst amongst email weary customers and prospects, consent fatigue and even some legal issues
    1. European Internet users are being subject to a lot of ‘consent theatre’ (ie noisy yet non-compliant cookie notices) — which in turn is causing knock-on problems of consumer mistrust and consent fatigue for all these useless pop-ups
  6. Sep 2018
    1. Deluged by apparent facts, arguments and counterarguments, our brains resort to the most obvious filter, the easiest cognitive shortcut for a social animal: We look to our peers, see what they believe and cheer along. As a result, open and participatory speech has turned into its opposite. Important voices are silenced by mobs of trolls using open platforms to hurl abuse and threats. Bogus news shared from one friend or follower to the next becomes received wisdom. Crucial pieces of information drown in so much irrelevance that they are lost. If books were burned in the street, we would be alarmed. Now, we are simply exhausted.
  7. Jan 2018