121 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Hogan, A. B., Jewell, B. L., Sherrard-Smith, E., Vesga, J. F., Watson, O. J., Whittaker, C., Hamlet, A., Smith, J. A., Winskill, P., Verity, R., Baguelin, M., Lees, J. A., Whittles, L. K., Ainslie, K. E. C., Bhatt, S., Boonyasiri, A., Brazeau, N. F., Cattarino, L., Cooper, L. V., … Hallett, T. B. (2020). Potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria in low-income and middle-income countries: A modelling study. The Lancet Global Health, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(20)30288-6

    1. Horby, P., Mafham, M., Linsell, L., Bell, J. L., Staplin, N., Emberson, J. R., Wiselka, M., Ustianowski, A., Elmahi, E., Prudon, B., Whitehouse, A., Felton, T., Williams, J., Faccenda, J., Underwood, J., Baillie, J. K., Chappell, L., Faust, S. N., Jaki, T., … Landray, M. J. (2020). Effect of Hydroxychloroquine in Hospitalized Patients with COVID-19: Preliminary results from a multi-centre, randomized, controlled trial. MedRxiv, 2020.07.15.20151852. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.07.15.20151852

  2. Jul 2020
    1. Meyer, B., Torriani, G., Yerly, S., Mazza, L., Calame, A., Arm-Vernez, I., Zimmer, G., Agoritsas, T., Stirnemann, J., Spechbach, H., Guessous, I., Stringhini, S., Pugin, J., Roux-Lombard, P., Fontao, L., Siegrist, C.-A., Eckerle, I., Vuilleumier, N., & Kaiser, L. (2020). Validation of a commercially available SARS-CoV-2 serological immunoassay. Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmi.2020.06.024

  3. Jun 2020
    1. Chen, L., Zhang, Z., Fu, J., Feng, Z., Zhang, S.-Z., Han, Q.-Y., Zhang, X., Xiao, X., Chen, H.-M., Liu, L.-L., Chen, X.-L., Lan, Y.-P., Zhong, D.-J., Hu, L., Wang, J.-H., Yu, X.-H., She, D.-Y., Zhu, Y.-H., & Yin, Z.-Y. (2020). Efficacy and safety of chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine in moderate type of COVID-19: A prospective open-label randomized controlled study. MedRxiv, 2020.06.19.20136093. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.06.19.20136093

    1. Sbidian, E., Josse, J., Lemaitre, G., Mayer, I., Bernaux, M., Gramfort, A., Lapidus, N., Paris, N., Neuraz, A., Lerner, I., Garcelon, N., Rance, B., Grisel, O., Moreau, T., Bellamine, A., Wolkenstein, P., Varoquaux, G., Caumes, E., Lavielle, M., … Audureau, E. (2020). Hydroxychloroquine with or without azithromycin and in-hospital mortality or discharge in patients hospitalized for COVID-19 infection: A cohort study of 4,642 in-patients in France. MedRxiv, 2020.06.16.20132597. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.06.16.20132597

  4. May 2020
  5. Apr 2020
    1. Newton, P. N., Bond, K. C., Adeyeye, M., Antignac, M., Ashenef, A., Awab, G. R., Babar, Z.-U.-D., Bannenberg, W. J., Bond, K. C., Bower, J., Breman, J., Brock, A., Caillet, C., Coyne, P., Day, N., Deats, M., Douidy, K., Doyle, K., Dujardin, C., … Zaman, M. (2020). COVID-19 and risks to the supply and quality of tests, drugs, and vaccines. The Lancet Global Health, S2214109X20301364. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(20)30136-4

    1. wastewater treatment disease transmission studies from that time did not usually consider respiratory pathogens.

      During the 1980s, there were few pathogens that were both known to initiate infection in the lungs and frequently occur in wastewater (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1980). It was viewed as an anomaly if an enteric pathogen was “uniquely infectious by the aerosol route”, with the noted exception of the respiratory bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    1. An effective therapy to combat biofilm should include effective removal of the biofilm, antimicrobial eradication of bacteria/organisms, and prevention of biofilm recurrence, and these treatment options may need to be repeated multiple times to achieve effective therapy.
    2. A few products have been suggested to control and remove biofilms, such as surfactant and some wound cleansing formulas. In addition, topical broad-spectrum antimicrobials such as silver, iodine, honey, and others have been suggested to aid in the treatment of biofilms.
    3. The best method of treating wounds with biofilms is not well defined. It is believed that frequent debridement to mechanically remove the biofilm remains to be the best method of treatment. The frequency of debridement is not well defined, although a weekly debridement has been suggested to improve healing. More than one method of debridement might be needed in wounds resistant to healing.
    4. Although there are numerous indications and potential indications for HBOT, there are 14 accepted indications by Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, and the FDA. Indications related to wounds and ulcers include clostridial myonecrosis, crush injury, radiation-induced soft tissue and bone necrosis, necrotizing soft tissue infections, diabetic ulcers Wagner III or higher, refractory osteomyelitis, and thermal burns.
    5. At present, only platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) is currently approved by the FDA for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Application of recombinant human PDGF-BB in a gel suspension to these wounds increases the incidence of total healing and decreases healing time.
    6. Bioengineered skin substitutes have evolved from keratinocyte monolayers to dermal equivalents to split-thickness products with a pseudo-epidermis, and most recently, to products containing both epidermal and dermal components that resemble the three-dimensional structure and function of normal skin (see Table 9-11). Indicated for use with standard compression therapy in the treatment of venous insufficiency ulcers and for the treatment of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers, these bilayered skin equivalents also are being used in a variety of wound care settings.
    1. Chest radiography was repeated on day 4 and showed no thoracic abnormalities. Transthoracic echocardiography, performed on day 6, revealed a significant reduction of LV wall thickness (interventricular septum, 11 mm; posterior wall, 10 mm), an improvement of LVEF to 44%, and a slight decrease of pericardial effusion (maximum, 8-9 mm). At the time of submission, the patient was hospitalized with progressive clinical and hemodynamic improvement.
    1. Indications for operative treatment of thoracic injuries Initial tube thoracostomy drainage of >1000 mL (penetrating injury) or >1500 mL (blunt injury) Ongoing tube thoracostomy drainage of >200 mL/h for 3 consecutive hours in noncoagulopathic patients Caked hemothorax despite placement of two chest tubes Great vessel injury (endovascular techniques may be used in selected patients) Pericardial tamponade Cardiac herniation Massive air leak from the chest tube with inadequate ventilation Tracheal or main stem bronchial injury diagnosed by endoscopy or imaging Open pneumothorax Esophageal perforation Air embolism

      1000ml drainage (penetrating), >1500mlm (blunt) from tube. >200mL/h for 3h nonstop drainage in noncoagulopathic px. caked hemothorax after two chest tubes.great vessels inj. pericardial tamp. hernia of heart. inadequate ventilation with massive air leak.main stem or tracheal damage (imaginf or endoscopy). open pneumothorax. perforation of esophagus. air embolism

  6. Oct 2019
    1. indicate that even low concentrations of just a single type of antibiotic leads to resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics.

      I doubt this claim, do you mean they are correlated?

    1. suggesting that STPs have become an important source of contamination for their receiving rivers

      Read these references: Saying antibiotic resistance is proliferating in wastewater treatment plants

    2. Additionally, the concentrations of antibiotics and the abundance of ARGs might increase after the sewage treatment process.

      Wow, that is a strong and counter-intuitive claim. Is this rigorously determined?