435 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Imperative UI causes all sorts of problems, most of which revolve around state, which is another fancy term meaning “values we store in our code”. We need to track what state our code is in, and make sure our user interface correctly reflects that state.
    1. Yet many teams struggle to achieve a unified way of evaluating what they’ve delivered. Only 1 in 10 have a process for assessing the success or failure of newly-launched products and features.

      we've done this informally, but might consider a more formal approach

    2. For the product teams lacking a systematic way of logging these feature requests, pain points, and other bits of user feedback, a lot of valuable information ends up slipping through the cracks.

      we are working at getting better at this but there is room for improvement

  2. Oct 2020
    1. Microlearning: Knowledge management applications and competency-based training in the workplace

      Lynn C. Emerson, & Zane L. Berge. (2018). Microlearning: Knowledge management applications and competency-based training in the workplace. Knowledge Management & E-Learning: An International Journal, 10(2), 125–132.

      https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=shib&db=edsdoj&AN=edsdoj.8793b57070bd45918c6e0875f40ced31&site=eds-live&scope=site&custid=uphoenix

      The focus of this article is a threefold discussion on microlearning 1) how microlearning best practices facilitate knowledge acquisition in the workplace by engaging and motivating employees through short, personalized, just-in-time learning, 2) ways microlearning integrates with knowledge management applications through situational mentoring, and 3) how competency-based microlearning, via subscription learning, is both an innovative approach to e-learning and an asset to learning organizations focused on improving the performance of their employees.

      8/10

    1. Instead of using classes and local state, Deku just uses functions and pushes the responsibility of all state management and side-effects onto tools like Redux.
    1. role-based access control, or RBAC
      • Is an approach to restricting system access to authorized users.

      • Controlling access to resources isn't all you can do. You can also centralize configuration management.

        You wouldn't want to setup printers or software for each and every user.

    1. The $ contract for auto-sub­scrib­ing is lovely in its sim­plic­ity and flex­i­bil­ity. You can adapt your own preferred state-man­age­ment pattern or library, with or without Svelte stores as helpers. Svelte does not fuss about how you want to manage your state.
    1. So today, as a somewhat limited experiment, I played around with my Hypothes.is atom feed (https://hypothes.is/stream.atom?user=chrisaldrich, because you know you want to subscribe to this) and piped it into IFTTT. Each post creates a new document in a OneDrive file which I can convert to a markdown .md file that can be picked up by my Obsidian client.

      Trying to see if this work for me when linking with google drive. Unsure how to convert to markdown.

  3. Sep 2020
    1. For commercial property managers, adopting PropTech trends is a key aspect to stay in the race of business waves. Moreover, the industry is doing great by embracing the technologies in all possible ways.

      The article talks about some PropTech that are hailing in 2020. The commercial real estate agencies are adopting these technologies to provide best in class services to their clients.

    1. This last characteristic may be the easiest to evaluate. Unless the position is very junior, I’ll usually hire product managers who’ve actually shipped a product. I mean from start to finish, concept to launch. Nothing is a better indication of someone’s ability to ship great products than having done it before. Past performance is an indication of future success
    2. I always insist that at a minimum, representatives from engineering, design, and marketing meet a potential PM candidate.
    3. I often joke that much of the time your job is to be the advocate for whoever isn’t currently in the room - the customer, engineering, sales, executives, marketing. That means you need to be capable of doing other people’s jobs, but smart enough to know not to. Great PMs know how to channel different points-of-view. They play devil’s advocate a lot. They tend to be unsatisfied with simple answers.
    4. So what do I look for in a PM? Most importantly, raw intellectual horsepower. I’ll take a wickedly smart, inexperienced PM over one of average intellect and years of experience any day. Product management is fundamentally about thinking on your feet, staying one step ahead of your competitors, and being able to project yourself into the minds of your colleagues and your customers.
    1. 2. Develop specific superpowers — don’t just rely on being a smart generalist.

      Bring something to the table. Could be solid design skills in my case (which I don't have yet)

    1. Whatever the future intentions of the PM, one thing remains for certain: this position is at the intersection from where founder strategy, user feedback, development team management, and market awareness come together. From what’s been said, it certainly appears that this is not a role that you “fall” into, but rather could aspire to be in.
    2. What’s more, to be a good PM, individuals also need to understand that it’s all about the bigger picture. Great managers “win” games, meaning that it’s not about getting a product out the door, but by ensuring that over the long-term, the team helps solve a larger problem. Nash says it’s not about getting an “E for effort” and brush off things that don’t work.
    3. The product manager isn’t the one that’s just sitting around overseeing the various teams and seeing whether it’s on track to meet the scheduled delivery or launch date. They are the ones who need to understand the market and that means knowing who the competitors are, what consumers want, and being able to help the marketing and sales teams better target them.
    1. More tactically,helping your team often means being the person who writes and summarizes notes after a long meeting, or writing a spec to make sure you have captured the team’s consensus and plan in written form.
      • Write notes after meeting and share with team.
    2. A lot of people describe a product manager as a CEO of the product or the “owner” of the spec, but I think that over-ascribes influence and authority to the product manager. The best teams operate in a way where the team collectively feels ownership over the spec and everyone has had input and been able to suggest and promote ideas. The best product managers coordinate the key decisions by getting input from all team members and are responsible to surface disagreements, occasionally break ties, and gather consensus (or at least ensure that everyone commits to a plan) when decisions get made.

      "CEO" of the product is an overrated term to describe PM.

      • Everybody on the team should feel heard/collective ownership
    3. Great product managers understand the very tricky balance between getting it right and getting it out the door.

      Balance between ship/get right = good product manager

    4. While shipping matters, the best product managers help the team make sure it’s the right product. Building something that doesn’t exist yet is always fun, but never a slam dunk.

      *

    5. More importantly, once shipped, the best product managers can measure whether the product shipped is the right one. They should work closely with the team to make sure the right moments in the product are measurable, and that the hard questions about whether people are really using the product can be answered.

      Once shipped good PM's know how to measure success fo the product

    6. Great product managers listen to user feedback all the time — whether it’s from usability tests, meeting users in the field, reading support emails or tweets, or working with the people in your company who do all of those things on a daily basis.

      *

    1. What do you think the most important things we should be doing over the next year? What will get in the way of us doing that? What’s going well, i.e. what should we make sure we don’t change? Is there anything you think I should know about?

      Good questions to ask as a new PM

    1. To me, abandoning all these live upgrades to have only k8s is like someone is asking me to just get rid of all error and exceptions handling and reboot the computer each time a small thing goes wrong.

      the Function-as-a-Service offering often have multiple fine-grained updateable code modules (functions) running within the same vm, which comes pretty close to the Erlang model.

      then add service mesh, which in some cases can do automatic retry at the network layer, and you start to recoup some of the supervisor tree advantages a little more.

      really fun article though, talking about the digital matter that is code & how we handle it. great reminder that there's much to explore. and some really great works we could be looking to.

    1. React Stately is a library of state management hooks for use in your component library.
    1. Provides state management for tree-like components. Handles building a collection of items from props, item expanded state, and manages multiple selection state.
    1. So why don't we extract the shared state out of the components, and manage it in a global singleton? With this, our component tree becomes a big "view", and any component can access the state or trigger actions, no matter where they are in the tree!
    1. It turns out that even the length of time an element has been mounted is an important piece of state that determines what pixels the user sees. And some of this state can’t simply be lifted into our application state.

      What this means is that our desire to express UI using pure functions is in direct conflict with the very nature of the DOM. It’s a great way to describe a state => pixels transformation — perfect for game rendering or generative art — but when we’re building apps on the web, the idea chafes against the reality of a stateful medium.

    1. Stores are global state. While context is local state.
    2. Notice it's not related to components. Another crucial difference is that it's accessible from outside of components. And good way to determine where goes where is to ask yourself, can this particular state and functionality still makes sense outside of the displayed component?
  4. Aug 2020
    1. I have a theory that time scarcity is also linked to something I'll call time scatteredness. This happens when you really have no idea how long it takes us to complete tasks, and this skews how much time you think you have or need.

      I relate to this so much I can still feel the sting on my cheek from where it slapped me

    1. it’s a wise idea to begin tracking your time in order to get a more realistic handle on how long specific projects and tasks take you. That’ll override your optimism bias and keep your expectations for your own productivity in check.
    2. Pushing a deadline back once is one thing. Needing to do it over and over again will make it appear as if you don’t know how to manage your own workload.
  5. Jul 2020