106 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2019
  2. Aug 2019
  3. Mar 2019
    1. Teaching problem solving This page is included because some of our theories indicate that problem solving should be taught specifically. This page is a bit unusual; I did not find many others like it. It is rather easy to read and also addresses the differences between novice and expert learners. rating 3/5

  4. Feb 2019
    1. “21C Skills” refers to a broad set of knowledge, skills, work habits, and character traits that are important to succeed in today’s world, particularly for college and career readiness and in the workplace. Examples of these skills include collaboration, communication, creativity, and problem-solving.
  5. Jan 2019
    1. And I feel like there's just not that much literature in general in this space because it's just such a new space.
    2. I'm also trying to start writing this book about crypto trading. I'm trying to market it, or the intended audience is intermediate to advanced traitors because I feel like there's not a lot of literature out there for that. It's mostly like bitcoin for dummies, bitcoin trading one on one. It's going to be beginning or stuff. And I only know of one book that's for intermediate to advanced and that's an old coins, an old coin traders handbook.
    3. Uh, also treating, you seem to have this multi charts optionality option where you can show hr it's four to a whatever charts on one screen. They, um, they have seem to have like more advanced tools. I would say like now that I'm better at a ta and I know it more, I can, I have access to more options. MMM. They also show, I don't think when did she does this, but I know trading view shows, uh, equities and for acts and commodities. Like, sometimes I just want to pull up the chart and just see what it looks like.

      Once he understood technical analysis, he was able to appreciate the multi-chart tools on trading view

    4. I just chose it and I paid and it was only like, I want to say like 30 bucks a month maybe. I Dunno. And that was also during the bull run when I had a lot more crypto money and I was just like, whatever. I'll buy it invested in my, uh, in my education and tools.
    5. it just seemed to be that in the summer I like realize okay, I really have to like be in one place and sit down and focus and read and like I have to get better if I really want to be like a, an adept trader. S
    6. A lot of the tools I've been using the free versions because I haven't gotten to the point where, uh, I'm knowledgeable on how to maximize its value and therefore I don't pay for it because my knowledge is lacking.
    7. So when I'm trying to become a better trader, [inaudible] or dig into why they were so focused on the chart going one way or the other and thinking about what data points they're using that others might not.
    8. gerous. It's too short term thinking. It doesn't actually allow you to advance as a trader, but I'm able to recognize over time who, and the reason I'm curious to have a stronger uh, uh, success rates with specific styles of trading
    9. And I'm constantly looking for ways to get a competitive edge, either through education or the tools that I'm using that will basically just give me information faster or more efficiently.
  6. Nov 2018
    1. IMPACTS OF LEARNING STYLES AND COMPUTER SKILLS ON ADULT STUDENTS’ LEARNING ONLINE

      This article explores how learning styles and computer skills impact student online learning. Further consideration is also given to course format and participants who were first time online learners. This is a complex study that investigates possible skills and abilities of first time online students. It would be interesting to conduct the same study, ten years latter to see if the changes in technology has improved the learners' computer skills and therefore the results of the study.

      RATING: 7/10

    1. Digital Promise

      Digital promise website serves millions of underserved adults in the United States by offering educational resources via technology. With personalized learning and individual pathways, they stand a chance to advance in their careers and lives.

      The site has a network of educators and developers who contribute to the "Beacon Project". As part of this project, the site includes resources across the country that help with support and access to education.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. LINCS is a national leadership initiative of the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) to expand evidence-based practice in the field of adult education. LINCS demonstrates OCTAE’s commitment to delivering high-quality, on-demand educational opportunities to practitioners of adult education, so those practitioners can help adult learners successfully transition to postsecondary education and 21st century jobs.

      The LINCS website has an abundance of information that can prove useful in the designing of adult educational materials which are technology based. The site includes courses, articles and links 743 research studies, materials and products. In addition there are State Resources for Adult Education and Literacy Professional Development. Overall I found the site to be a wonderful source of relevant information to tap into.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  7. Sep 2018
    1. 400 Fortune 500 CEOs. They found that 75% of long-term college and career success depends upon developing soft skills.

      Unclear methodology but even if the numbers are off, it's clear that leaders at our biggest companies value these skills that, right now, are not reliably communicated as a part of learner narratives.

  8. Jul 2018
    1. Teaching Tech Together

      Resources to help design/conduct effective teaching about technology.

    1. Encouraging Students to Be In Tune With One Another

      Communication and collaboration skills are key for navigating through society and relationships successfully- not as much emphasis in education as there should be!

    1. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.

      Both must be present for learning and growing

    2. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom.

      Digital skills involve knowing how to execute tasks on the computer. Digital Literacy involves searching and analyzing deeper into content in order to apply appropriate criteria.

    1. Examples of these skills include collaboration, communication, creativity, and problem-solving.

      Skills that are also learned in theatre education! Integrating tech and theatre education could be powerful in developing these skills

  9. Feb 2018
    1. Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently

      use multiple sources to find evidence find insightful evidence that supports your opinion locate an answer to a question in a timely manner solve problems effectively

    2. nterpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears

      interpret information from various platforms explain how info helps you understand text

    3. Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur)

      use information/evidence examine and interpret illustrations use evidence from text demonstrate understanding of text

    4. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.

      use information/evidence from illustrations and words read print and digital text demonstrate understanding of literary elements

    5. Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events

      use illustrations use details in a story describe characters describe setting describe events

    6. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts)

      describe relationships between illustrations and stories

    7. se information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot

      In order to gain information from the text students require skill of knowing what events are most important and what details are most important to the story. This will help students with their overall understanding of the story.

  10. Nov 2017
    1. important ScrumMaster characteristics.

      One must be (among others):

      • Knowledgeable
      • Questioning
      • Patient
      • Collaborative
      • Protective
      • Transparent
  11. Oct 2017
    1. What is often lost by many educators and progressives is that popular culture is a powerful form of education for many young people, and yet it is rarely addressed as a serious source of knowledge

      more on point 3/6: pop culture has to be taken seriously

    2. developing alternative public spheres

      more on point 3/6: alternative public spheres

    3. They must also learn how to be cultural producers

      more on point 3/6: literacies require information production, not just consumption

    4. Far more than a teaching method, education is a moral and political practice actively involved not only in the production of knowledge, skills and values but also in the construction of identities, modes of identification, and forms of individual and social agency.

      As in OKP's literacies, skills, identities, communities. Should values and agency be included in this list or are they the products of these other focuses?

    1. Communications skills being explicitly taught

      Again, social annotation/reading provide an opportunity for this kind of instruction: teacher has a view into how students are interacting with each other (and text).

    1. Emden, C. (1998). Establishing a ‘track record’: Research productivity and nursing academe.Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing,16(1), 29–33

      Discusses the adequacy of writing training and support in PhD programmes.

  12. Sep 2017
    1. ‘Assessment and Teaching of 21st Century Skills’ programme funded by Intel, Cisco and Microsoft and led by the University of Melbourne

      soft skills project

    2. ‘transversal competencies’, ‘non-academic skills’ and ‘non-cognitive skills’

      synonyms for "intangible skills", "21C skills", "soft skills"

    3. rather than institutions providing formal tuition or teaching, the approach focuses on supporting informal mentoring relationships between individuals
    4. ‘Soft’ and ‘complementary’ skills, including ‘twenty-first century skills’,

      Area 4 of educational focus

    5. Specialized digital skills for professionals with ICT-related jobs.

      Area 3 of educational focus

    6. Digital literacy for all or basic digital skills for low-level users of ICT.

      Area 1 of educational focus

    7. Computer programming and coding skills for children and young people.

      Area 2 of educational focus

    8. 3.‘Higher level’ skills: using digital technology in empowering and transformative ways
    9. 2. Generic digital skills: Using digital technologies in meaningful and beneficial ways
    10. 1. Basic functional digital skills: Accessing and engaging with digital technologies
    11. Remote and automated systems

      Trend 6 shaping skills

    12. Data-based and computational

      Trend 5 shaping skills

    13. Proprietary and open forms of technology provision

      Trend 4 shaping skills

    14. Participatory (co)creation and ‘making’

      Trend 3 shaping skills

    15. Social and collaborative

      Trend 2 shaping skills

    16. Networked computing

      Trend 1 shaping skills

    17. Foster ‘soft’ and ‘complementary’ digital skills: Incorporation of ‘twenty-first century skills’ into national curricula; development and promotion of practical programmes that aim to inform and safeguard digital safety; implications of online activities; development of digital literacy and citizenship; knowledge of digital rights; and awareness of how digital technology, big data and algorithms shape society.

      soft/complementary digital skills

    18. Promising trends
      1. Digital literacy for all
      2. Coding for youth
      3. Training for ICT jobs
      4. Soft/complementary digital skills
    19. The term ‘digital skills’ refers to a range of different abilities, many of which are not only ‘skills’ per se, but a combination of behaviours, expertise, know-how, work habits, character traits, dispositions and critical understandings.

      digital skills as constellations of capabilities

    20. Working Group on Education:Digital skills for life and workSeptember 2017

      ITU/UNESCO Broadband Commission for Sustainable Development

  13. Aug 2017
    1. The embedding of maker culture in K–12 education has made students active contributors to the knowledge ecosystem rather than merely participants and consumers of knowledge.

      How does this get balanced with privacy concerns? I have yet to see an argument or practice that successfully navigates this tension?

  14. Jul 2017
    1. Teach Source EvaluationSkillsIf you want to teach source evaluation skills, have small groups conduct research to answer a three-part problem such as this:1.How high is Mt. Fuji in feet?2.Find a different answer to this same question.3.Which answer do you trust and why do you trust it?As you observe students begin work on the third part of the problem, you likely will see a student begin to use the strategy that you have tar-geted: locating and evaluating the source of the information. When you see someone use this strategy, perhaps by clicking on a link to “About Us,” interrupt the other groups and have this student teach the strategy to the class, explaining how he or she evaluates a source for expertise and reliability. There are many inconsistent facts online that can also be used, just like this, to teach source evaluation including: “How long is the Mis-sissippi River?” or “What is the population of San Francisco?”
  15. May 2017
    1. From Fagella & Deshler (2007): The goal... is to create an instructional synergy across the levels within the continuum in which all teachers recognize that they have a responsibility and important role to play in enhancing the literacy skills of students.

  16. Jan 2017
    1. manual training

      Dewey spoke about this long before now and we still adhere to it, why is this? True innovations doesn't come from manuals nor does critical thinking and great problem solvers. Do we really still need manuals with the web and open source?

    2. an effort to meet the needs of the new society that is forming

      What kind of society is being formed now? Conformist or free thinkers? It seems we are headed in the wrong direction if we don't offer choice to teachers and students about their learning and growth.

    3. it destroys our democracy

      The same could be said about standardized testing. Not that it's not important but it can't be the emphasis nor the entire focus.

    4. the progress made by the individual child

      Are we back in an age of educational individualism with our "personalized learning" etc? Should we be talking more about communal learning?

  17. Sep 2016
    1. As many universities are being queried by the federal government on how they spend their endowment money, and enrollment decreases among all institutions nationally, traditional campuses will need to look at these partnerships as a sign of where education is likely going in the future, and what the federal government may be willing to finance with its student loan programs going ahead.

      To me, the most interesting about this program is that it sounds like it’s targeting post-secondary institutions. There are multiple programs to “teach kids to code”. Compulsory education (primary and secondary) can provide a great context for these, in part because the type of learning involved is so broad and pedagogical skills are so recognized. In post-secondary contexts, however, there’s a strong tendency to limit coding to very specific contexts, including Computer Science or individual programs. We probably take for granted that people who need broad coding skills can develop them outside of their college and university programs. In a way, this isn’t that surprising if we’re to compare coding to very basic skills, like typing. Though there are probably many universities and colleges where students can get trained in typing, it’s very separate from the curriculum. It might be “college prep”, but it’s not really a college prerequisite. And there isn’t that much support in post-secondary education. Of course, there are many programs, in any discipline, giving a lot of weight to coding skills. For instance, learners in Digital Humanities probably hone in their ability to code, at some point in their career. And it’s probably hard for most digital arts programs to avoid at least some training in programming languages. It’s just that these “general” programs in coding tend to focus almost exclusively on so-called “K–12 Education”. That this program focuses on diversity is also interesting. Not surprising, as many such initiatives have to do with inequalities, real or perceived. But it might be where something so general can have an impact in Higher Education. It’s also interesting to notice that there isn’t much in terms of branding or otherwise which explicitly connects this initiative with colleges and universities. Pictures on the site show (diverse) adults, presumably registered students at universities and colleges where “education partners” are to be found. But it sounds like the idea of a “school” is purposefully left quite broad or even ambiguous. Of course, these programs might also benefit adult learners who aren’t registered at a formal institution of higher learning. Which would make it closer to “para-educational” programs. In fact, there might something of a lesson for the future of universities and colleges.

    2. As many universities are being queried by the federal government on how they spend their endowment money, and enrollment decreases among all institutions nationally, traditional campuses will need to look at these partnerships as a sign of where education is likely going in the future, and what the federal government may be willing to finance with its student loan programs going ahead.

      To me, the most interesting about this program is that it sounds like it’s targeting post-secondary institutions. There are multiple programs to “teach kids to code”. Compulsory education (primary and secondary) can provide a great context for these, in part because the type of learning involved is so broad and pedagogical skills are so recognized. In post-secondary contexts, however, there’s a strong tendency to limit coding to very specific contexts, including Computer Science or individual programs. We probably take for granted that people who need broad coding skills can develop them outside of their college and university programs. In a way, this isn’t that surprising if we’re to compare coding to very basic skills, like typing. Though there are probably many universities and colleges where students can get trained in typing, it’s very separate from the curriculum. It might be “college prep”, but it’s not really a college prerequisite. And there isn’t that much support in post-secondary education. Of course, there are many programs, in any discipline, giving a lot of weight to coding skills. For instance, learners in Digital Humanities probably hone in their ability to code, at some point in their career. And it’s probably hard for most digital arts programs to avoid at least some training in programming languages. It’s just that these “general” programs in coding tend to focus almost exclusively on so-called “K–12 Education”. That this program focuses on diversity is also interesting. Not surprising, as many such initiatives have to do with inequalities, real or perceived. But it might be where something so general can have an impact in Higher Education. It’s also interesting to notice that there isn’t much in terms of branding or otherwise which explicitly connects this initiative with colleges and universities. Pictures on the site show (diverse) adults, presumably registered students at universities and colleges where “education partners” are to be found. But it sounds like the idea of a “school” is purposefully left quite broad or even ambiguous. Of course, these programs might also benefit adult learners who aren’t registered at a formal institution of higher learning. Which would make it closer to “para-educational” programs. In fact, there might something of a lesson for the future of universities and colleges.

  18. Jul 2016
  19. May 2016
  20. Apr 2016
  21. Mar 2016
  22. Feb 2016
    1. Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

      Grade 4 students must be able to utilize the skills of drawing on the similarities and differences on how stories are narrated in text. Moreover, students must be able to identify the difference between first and third person stories, by analyzing the texts for key-words such as "I" when referring to quotations.

    2. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text

      Second graders must have the skill sets of both asking and answering critical questions relating to the story, specifically, who, what, when, where, and why. After identifying the answers to these questions, second graders must also support their conclusions through retrieving information from the texts. The skills used in this common core standard include asking, identifying, and supporting.

    3. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text

      At this point in reading, first graders should be able to make predictions and inferences, prior to, during, ad after the reading of a text. First graders will be able to do this by using key information as well as context clues from the text, such as descriptive details, punctuations denoting voice inflections, pictures, etc.

    4. With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details

      With the use of scaffolding teachers help kindergarteners further develop both their knowledge in stories kindergarteners have previously heard/read as well as their skills in retelling the key details of the familiar story. Recalling a story's major events, characters, settings, sequential details, etc. require kindergarten students to tap into their prior knowledge and skill sets in accurately retelling a story.

    5. Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text

      This is knowledge because the students have to know what the meaning, tone and beauty of a text means and it is also a skill because then they have to be able to write about it

    6. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

      This is both knowledge and a skill because it is knowledge because the children have to know what summarize means and it is a skill because they have to be able to summarize the story or poem.

    7. Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and

      This is knowledge because they need to know different traits and feelings of people and it is also a skill because they need to remember the trait and be able to write about it.

    8. determine their central message, lesson, or mora

      This would be a skill because they would have to pick out the message and lesson from the story.

    9. Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.

      this is a skill for children in first grade because they need to be able to pick out words that connect to their 5 senses. A good example of this would be a book called Dog's Colorful Day because it talks about food and colors which pertain to the senses of sight and taste.

    10. Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems).

      This is a skills that kindergarteners need to know. You could give them the story of the three little pigs and hey Dittle Dittle and ask them to tell you which one is the story.

    11. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text

      Fourth grade students must have knowledge about what a theme is. They must be able to use this knowledge to identify the themes of multiple pieces of literature.

      They must also have the skill to pull out key details of texts in order to summarize story-lines.

    12. Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.

      Fifth grade students must know the definition of third-person point of view omniscient, third-person point of view limited, first person point of view, and second person point of view.

      Students must also have the skill set that allows them to understand how these different points of view effect the way a particular text is told.

    13. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

      A third grade students must have the skill to understand that some words have multiple meanings. They must also have the skill to use a dictionary so that they can look up the definitions of words.

      These students also need the knowledge that allows them to understand that things are not always meant literally.

    14. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.

      A second grade student must know the definition of characters, challenges, and major events.

      They must have knowledge about reactions and how events play a role in how characters develop throughout a story.

      They must have the skill to identify the actions of characters and what events or challenges occurred in a story.

      A good lesson to go along with this standard would be to read a book and then make a cause and effect chart as a class. This can help students identify the reactions of a character and what caused them to react this way.

    15. Ask and answer questions

      Kindergarten students must be able to identify that they do not know certain words, and then know to ask for help or ways to get to know words. Having everyone in the class underline 3 words they do not know in a text and then going around and talking about them could be helpful

    16. Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics

      5th grade students must be able to look at books of the same genre and compare the texts within that genre to each other. It is here they can make connections between how plots of different stories have similar makings within that genre. An activity a fifth grade teacher could do would be to look at the magic tree house series (pick one of the books) and the A to Z Mysteries series (pick one of the books. Although they are different series how they develop the stories (exposition/settings/characters) are very similar. Making a T-chart with the order in which events happen could be very helpful!

    17. read and comprehend

      3rd grade students must be able to read and understand different types of literature appropriate to 3rd graders independently. Having SSR sessions and then journaling about what was read, and then sharing could help greatly in understanding/getting better at reading.

    18. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

      5th grade students must be able to look at a text and what the words imply, especially in figurative language. An awesome example show students figurative language would be any of the books in the Amelia Bedelia series, because she is constantly misreading figurative language and would be a great start/talking point for looking at figurative language, plus they are all great reads!

    19. Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e

      4th grade students must be able to compare and contrast different themes in texts because it is what makes them different. Example Question: A good question in all texts would be "what do you think the author wanted to teach us". Here the themes of the texts could be talked about and contrasted by students.

    20. Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).

      5th grade students must be able to look at a text as a whole in order to fully understand the meaning of it. By looking at the smaller parts that make up a story (such as characters and what makes them different from each other/why they are included) is crucial in reading, not just staring, at literature. Making a venn diagram with two characters and seeing how they are different and how they are connected could greatly help 5th graders see how characters interact and contrast.

    21. define the role of each

      This would be what the student needs to do. They need to pick out the author and illustrator of the story. a good example of this might be a story by Dr. Suess because a lot of children have read his books

  23. Jun 2015
    1. while communications skills themselves are predicted to be critical to success in all field s in the 21 st century economy (Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2009) .

      Annotation as modeling collaborative writing and review of documents in work places.