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  1. Last 7 days
    1. Compusophic Systems

      those old school tech companies names! compu-sophic! computer - philosophic

  2. Jul 2019
    1. In 1996 and 1998, a pair of workshops at the University of Glasgow on information retrieval and human–computer interaction sought to address the overlap between these two fields. Marchionini notes the impact of the World Wide Web and the sudden increase in information literacy – changes that were only embryonic in the late 1990s.

      it took a half a century for these disciplines to discern their complementarity!

  3. Jun 2019
    1. Bob Barton [said] "The basic principle of recursive design is to make the parts have the same power as the whole." For the first time I thought of the whole as the entire computer, and wondered why anyone would want to divide it up into weaker things called data structures and procedures. Why not divide it up into little computers... Why not thousands of them, each simulating a useful structure?
  4. Dec 2018
    1. Ms. Berezin held nine computer-related patents. Her Data Secretary is on display at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif.

      Definitely need to get to this museum!

  5. Nov 2018
    1. But hey, we're not running Windows 95 anymore! The current branch of windows is based on Windows NT, not Win95. But Windows NT wanted compatibility with DOS/Windows programs. And XP merged the two lines. So these special files still work, FORTY FOUR FUCKING YEARS LATER

      special files today 44 years later--backwards compatibility

    2. This idea was brought into CP/M by Gary Kiddal in 1974. You could do neat things with it like copy data off the serial port into a text file, or print a textfile right from the command line! This is done in unix by having special files existing in special folders, like /dev/tty for the console or /dev/lp0 for the first printer. You can get infinite zeros from /dev/zero, random bytes from /dev/random, etc! but here's the problem: CP/M is designed for 8-bit computers with very little memory, and no hard drives. At best you've got an 8" floppy drive. So directories? you don't need 'em. Instead of directories, you just use different disks. but without directories you can't put all your special files over in a /dev/ directory. So they're just "everywhere", effectively. So if you have FOO.TXT and need to print it, you can do "PIP LST:=FOO.TXT" which copies foo.txt to the "file" LST, which is the printer. and it works where ever you are, because there are no directories! it's simple. but what about extensions? Here's the problem: programs like to name their files with the right extension. so if you're running a program and it goes "ENTER FILENAME TO SAVE LISTING TO" you could tell it LST to print it or PTP to punch it out to tape (cause it's 1974, remember?) but the program might try to put .TXT on the end of your filename! LST.TXT isn't the printer, right? Nah. It is. These special devices exist at all extensions, so that this works. so if "CON" is reserved to refer to the keyboard, so is CON.TXT and CON.WAT and CON.BUG

      special files in cp/m

    1. This means that software that deals with Internet must be actively maintained. If it is not it will become more and more useless in practice over time, however much it remains theoretically correct, not because it has bugs or security holes as such but because the environment it was designed to work in no longer exists and thus the assumptions it was built on are now incorrect.

      internet software decays

    1. Study: Most Teaching and Learning Uses Technology Nowadays

      This article reviews the impact of technology in the classroom. Today over 73% of teachers stated students are using tablets or laptops in the classroom. According to David Nagel, technology not only dominates education but also make students more productive and stimulates them intellectually.

      There is a link on the site to the complete study.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  6. Oct 2018
    1. Engelbart embedded a set of organizing principles in his lab, which he termed "bootstrapping strategy".
    2. Engelbart's career was inspired in December 1950 when he was engaged to be married and realized he had no career goals other than "a steady job, getting married and living happily ever after".[14] Over several months he reasoned that: he would focus his career on making the world a better place[15] any serious effort to make the world better would require some kind of organized effort that harnessed the collective human intellect of all people to contribute to effective solutions. if you could dramatically improve how we do that, you'd be boosting every effort on the planet to solve important problems – the sooner the better computers could be the vehicle for dramatically improving this capability.[14]

      Engelbart's guiding philosophy

    1. A lot of this would be a non issue if we had end user programming. The problem today is that 'configurability' is itself something the programmer needs to implement

      acme example rob pike apparently had an elaborate answer as to why he wouldn't allow to change the colorschme

    2. 1 reply 1 retweet 5 likes Reply 1 Retweet 1 Retweeted 1 Like 5 Liked 5 Direct message Omar Rizwan‏ @rsnous Feb 16 More Copy link to Tweet Embed Tweet Mute @rsnous Unmute @rsnous Block @rsnous Unblock @rsnous Report Tweet Add to other Moment Add to new Moment Replying to @rsnous @disquiet07 files are a weak lowest-common-denominator interface between programs in different languages (C, Python, Ruby, Swift, VB, bash, etc) in ecosystems with one language (iOS, JS, Lisp, Smalltalk), you often don't see files: you just persist the rich native structures of the language 4 replies 2 retweets 16 likes Reply 4 Retweet 2 Retweeted 2 Like 16 Liked 16 Direct message Gordon Brander‏ @gordonbrander 3h3 hours ago More Copy link to Tweet Embed Tweet Mute @gordonbrander Unmute @gordonbrander Block @gordonbrander Unblock @gordonbrander Report Tweet Add to other Moment Add to new Moment Replying to @rsnous @disquiet07 OTOH — lowest common denominator interfaces allow for emergent behavior. They focus all the constraints in one place, leaving the rest of the system definition open-ended. Like defining the LEGO dot, but not what shape pieces may take. 1 reply 0 retweets 3 likes Reply 1 Retweet Retweeted Like 3 Liked 3 Direct message Omar Rizwan‏ @rsnous 2h2 hours ago More Copy link to Tweet Embed Tweet Mute @rsnous Unmute @rsnous Block @rsnous Unblock @rsnous Report Tweet Add to other Moment Add to new Moment Replying to @gordonbrander @disquiet07 With files, imo the lack of structure 1. forces duplication of functions at the app level (de/serialization, cross-links, …) and 2. prevents coordination for higher-level behavior #1 here seems different from LEGO, but I can't quite articulate it in terms of your analogy 1 reply 0 retweets 2 likes Reply 1 Retweet Retweeted Like 2 Liked 2 Direct message Gordon Brander‏ @gordonbrander 2h2 hours ago Follow Follow @gordonbrander Following Following @gordonbrander Unfollow Unfollow @gordonbrander Blocked Blocked @gordonbrander Unblock Unblock @gordonbrander Pending Pending follow request from @gordonbrander Cancel Cancel your follow request to @gordonbrander More Copy link to Tweet Embed Tweet Mute @gordonbrander Unmute @gordonbrander Mute this conversation Unmute this conversation Block @gordonbrander Unblock @gordonbrander Report Tweet Add to other Moment Add to new Moment Replying to @rsnous @disquiet07 I agree. Low-level interop has a high floor, high ceiling. Higher-level interop (like Smalltalk) has lower floors, because deeper system integration. However, that deeper integration often means you end up more entangled with the system’s strengths and weaknesses.
    1. I am a grad student. I sought help for my mental illness last year. I go to one of those 'top 10' universities in the US. Grad life is hard, I do not have a lot of support from my family, and I am socially awkward. As far as coursework and work was concerned, I was struggling to organize my work and time. I used to be a huge fan of services like Trello, RescueTime, Evernote, all those technologies out there for managing and organizing. I used notepad or MS Word for documentation and writing reports. I wrote code in Visual Studio and Anaconda's Spyder (no offense to Anaconda). That's what my friends were doing, but I guess it was not enough for me, because I tend to get very nervous when there is a lot of work, and the smallest things can push me off the edge. I need everything to be organized and neat. I discovered Emacs in May 2018. I was in a terrible place then. I thought I was never going to recover. I was just trying out different text editors to optimize my workflow when I found Emacs. The first thing that completely amazed me was org-mode: agenda, the tree structure, org-babel, everything! Then I started writing all my code in Emacs, for all my coursework and work in machine learning, game development, etc. I learned how to store links to particular lines in huge code files, so that I can access them quickly, and continue work where I had left off. I also journal, I have been journaling for 4 years, that is how I deal with my problems. I have tried many software packages for journaling, and none of them come close to what I can do in Emacs. Now I can also write lisp scripts for doing simple routine processes that would make my workflow much simpler, so that I don't have to worry about small details and concentrate on more important things. I have recovered significantly from my depression. I still feel terrible, but I can handle things with more ease because Emacs reduces a lot of unnecessary cognitive load. I wonder what I would have been if I had decided not to explore Emacs. It's true what they say, any text editor can save your files, only Emacs can save your soul.

      about emacs helping to recover from depression, wow!

    1. As the power is unleashed, computers on the Semantic Web achieve at first the ability to describe, then to infer, and then to reason. The schema is a huge step, and one that will enable a vast amount of interoperability and extra functionality. However, it still only categorizes data. It says nothing about meaning or understanding.

      The author presents an interesting progression for the Web to eventually learn to reason. The picture he paints of more accessible content on the internet hinges on the internet learning to reason, which is a human characteristic. It seems we need to apply human characteristics to all of our mechanics for them to progress in their usefulness.

  7. Aug 2018
  8. Sep 2017
    1. Pill is now, and much like “mere” tools such as cellphones or computers.

      This part of the text is a good example of how technology has become transparent because cellphones and other computers are used so regularly that the knowledge of how to use them, are second nature; however, social groups that are excluded from this idea are the lower class whom cannot afford such luxuries. Most of these examples seem to be geared towards the upper middle class.

  9. Jun 2017
    1. Nowadays, it would be hard to find a humanist who doesn't use a com- puter in some aspect of his work. The computing humanist has evolved into a scholar who not only uses the computer in his work, but also engages with the methodological and theoretical aspects of computer use in humanities disciplines. The ways in which technology is used by humanists has diversi- fied to span everything from word processor use and web page creation to the development and use of complex software systems for analysis of a broad range of data types, including not only literary and historical texts but also databases of humanities information, images, and sound. As a result, in recent years CHum has come to serve an increasingly wide array of disci- plines and research areas - English, History, New Media, Music, Corpus Linguistics, Comlutational Linguistics, and many others - and received top- notch submissions in all of them. For most of its history, the diversity of disciplines and methodologies represented in CHum's articles enabled cross- fertilization of ideas which was highly valued by the community. However, as computer use in the humanities has come to span an increasingly broad range of activities, and as computational methodologies evolve and become more sophisticated and specialized, it has become more and more difficult to retain that diversity and at the same time provide enough articles relevant to a particular area of interest. It seems, then, that the time has come to narrow the journal's focus in order to best serve its readers

      On the narrowing of COmputing and the Humanities

  10. Apr 2017
    1. ON PIRACYComputers, by their nature, copy. Typing this line, the computer has copied the text multiple times in a variety of memory registers. I touch a button to type a letter, this releases a voltage that is then translated into digital value, which is then copied into a memory buffer and sent to another part of the computer, copied again into RAM and sent to the graphics card where it is copied again, and so on. The entire operation of a computer is built around copying data: copying is one of the most essential characteristics of computer science. One of the ontological facts of digital storage is that there is no difference between a computer program, a video, mp3-song, or an e-book. They are all composed of voltage represented by ones and zeros. Therefore they are all subject to the same electronic fact: they exist to be copied and can only ever exist as copies.

      the meaning of COPY

  11. Mar 2017
    1. I have a lot of questions about whether any of the web-based tools we are using actually fit the mold of System A. I don’t often feel those spaces as convivial and natural. Behind the artifice of interface lay the reality of code. Is that structure humane? Is it open, sustainable, and regenerative? Does it feel good? Does the whole idea behind code generate System A or System B? I really don’t know.

      This is a really good key question..

  12. May 2016
    1. neg­a­tive effect occurs in class­rooms where lap­tops and tablets are per­mit­ted with­out restric­tion and in class­rooms where stu­dents are only per­mit­ted to use tablets that must remain flat on the desk surface.

      Another study suggests that we should keep laptops out of the classroom. Unfortunately, tablets appear to be a problem too.

  13. Sep 2015
  14. Jun 2015