54 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2019
    1. Validate Candidate’s Skills with Coding Assessment Test

      Test coding skills of candidates using Wild Noodle's online coding assessment tests. Their automated online coding challenges to assess developers' programming skills and also have an extensive pool of role based programming and objective questions. Contact now!

  2. Aug 2019
    1. [![lessondesk-code-style](https://img.shields.io/badge/code%20style-lessondesk-ffa400.svg?style=flat-square)](https://github.com/lessondesk/eslint-config)
  3. Jul 2019
  4. educatorinnovator.org educatorinnovator.org
    1. I, Pseudocoder

      This made me chuckle--both because I am living in a pseudocoding space myself, so I identify with the self-deprecating humor, and because of the riff on "I, Robot"

  5. Apr 2019
    1. A compiler reads the program and translates it completely before the program starts running. In this case, the high-level program is called the source code, and the translated program is called the object code or the executable. Once a program is compiled, you can execute it repeatedly without further translation.

      A compiler: source code to object code

    2. An interpreter reads a high-level program and executes it, meaning that it does what the program says. It processes the program a little at a time, alternately reading lines and performing computations.

      A high-level code processor - interpreter

    1. programming is a skill that allows a computer scientist to take an algorithm and represent it in a notation (a program) that can be followed by a computer. These programs are written in programming languages.

      The programming skill

    2. If problem solving is a central part of computer science, then the solutions that you create through the problem solving process are also important. In computer science, we refer to these solutions as algorithms. An algorithm is a step by step list of instructions that if followed exactly will solve the problem under consideration.

      The definition of an algorithm

    1. The single most important skill for a computer scientist is problem solving. Problem solving means the ability to formulate problems, think creatively about solutions, and express a solution clearly and accurately. As it turns out, the process of learning to program is an excellent opportunity to practice problem solving skills.

      The importance of problem solving for CSs

    2. Like mathematicians, computer scientists use formal languages to denote ideas (specifically computations). Like engineers, they design things, assembling components into systems and evaluating tradeoffs among alternatives. Like scientists, they observe the behavior of complex systems, form hypotheses, and test predictions.

      Computer scientists combine features of mathematicians, engineers and natural scientists

  6. Feb 2019
    1. Understanding basic principles, purpose, and applications of coding and programming languages

      The setup of a website is important to understand. It helps to make the content more approachable and understandable.

  7. Sep 2018
    1. In this singularity-free world, the future would be bleak for programmers. (Imagine having to cope with hundreds of years of legacy software!)

      I'm not really sure I agree with this. Regardless of whether Singularity eventually comes around or not, software will evolve. We have seen whole languages fall out of usage in the past, including Fortran, COBOL, ALGOL, etc. Developers will always be looking to get more efficient, and our current languages will either get abandoned or improved. New languages will come up and become the new standard. If anything, the future seems to be far more bleak for programmers/developers in the years after Singularity, rather than in the years leading upto it - after all, with the prevalence of docile, conscious machines,most of the work programmers do, everything from bug-fixing to data-analytics, would be done more quickly, cheaply and efficiently by the machines. In other words, in the world of singularity, programmers as we know them would no longer exist.

  8. May 2018
    1. one level is chosen as the “reference”, and its mean behaviour is represented by the intercept. Each column of the resulting matrix represents the difference between the mean of one level and this reference level
  9. Feb 2018
    1. Inducir a la gente a componer con instrumentos predefinidos no puede dar lugar a un modo de producción diferente del autorizado por dichos instrumentos (

      Rasberry Pi y otros sistemas de Live Coding, introducirían nuevas maneras de hacer música.

  10. Nov 2017
    1. OneaspectofhackerculturethatColemanhighlightsistheslogan‘codeisspeech’.[46]CodeisindeedthelanguageoftheInternet.Butisitspeech?FollowingAustin,wearguethatthroughspeechactswedosomethinginorbysayingsomething.Similarly,wewouldarguethatprogrammersaredoingsomethinginorbycodingsomething.Yet,toarticulatethismoreprecisely,codeisnotspeech:itisalanguageinorbywhichspeechactsareperformed.Justasinhumanlanguages,thedecisivethingsherearenotonlythelinguisticconventionsthatanimatespeechactsbutalsothesocialconventionsthattheybringabout

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  11. Oct 2017
    1. Tanto Leo como Grafoscopio tienen limitaciones (y propósitos distintos). Sin embargo, en el caso de Grafoscopio, siento que puedo englobar y superar dichas limitaciones más fácilmente, no tanto porque lo hice desde el comienzo, sino por el entorno de live coding que me permite explorar y modificar el entorno en caliente.

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  12. Sep 2017
    1. As an estimate, for a scoping review of 120 studies, it could take the equivalent of 2to 3 weeks for one person one person’s time for, 2 to 3 weeks to undertake the process of coding studies,including developing and testing a coding tool, although this varies between each review

      Time taken to code for scoping study

    2. On the basis of our experience of carrying out scoping reviews, we estimate that it takes between 5 and20 minutes to apply codes to one research abstract, depending on the detail of coding required. However, priorto this process, time is needed to develop a coding tool. This involves: considering what data would inform theresearch questions, and therefore deciding the facets upon which to code, and creating a coding tool that isunambiguous, and both broad and detailed enough to describe the dataset. The tool is often developed usinga sample of data, and examining pre-existing tools.

      Time taken to code records

  13. Jun 2017
    1. retrieves the JSON data

      Step 2: Grabs the data from the URL...

    2. generates a well-formed search URL

      Step 1: Creates a URL to be looked at by another fuction/method

    3. To enhance that process, you could add the appropriate path to the output file name in this script, and write a shell script that runs this script and then commits/pushes to GitHub, and then schedule that script to run at regular intervals from your computer/server. I'm going to look into adding that functionality to this script, but it's not ready yet.
    1. # search for all annotations with the tag IndieEdTech and return them in json format. s = searchurl(tag = 'IndieEdTech') l = retrievelist(s) # print the title of each article annotated. for entry in l: e = Annotation(entry) print(e.title)

      I don't get it. Is this all I need to put into a Jupyter Notebook?

    2. given the annotation's API URL

      Is this specific to an annotation? Yes, I guess.

  14. Sep 2016
    1. Programming is not a detail that can be left to ‘technicians’ under the false pretence that their choices will be ‘scientifically neutral’. Societies are too complex
    2. Insisting on the glamour and fun of coding is the wrong way to acquaint kids with computer science. It insults their intelligence and plants the pernicious notion in their heads that you don’t need discipline in order to progress. As anyone with even minimal exposure to making software knows, behind a minute of typing lies an hour of study.

      Thank you!

    1. As many universities are being queried by the federal government on how they spend their endowment money, and enrollment decreases among all institutions nationally, traditional campuses will need to look at these partnerships as a sign of where education is likely going in the future, and what the federal government may be willing to finance with its student loan programs going ahead.

      To me, the most interesting about this program is that it sounds like it’s targeting post-secondary institutions. There are multiple programs to “teach kids to code”. Compulsory education (primary and secondary) can provide a great context for these, in part because the type of learning involved is so broad and pedagogical skills are so recognized. In post-secondary contexts, however, there’s a strong tendency to limit coding to very specific contexts, including Computer Science or individual programs. We probably take for granted that people who need broad coding skills can develop them outside of their college and university programs. In a way, this isn’t that surprising if we’re to compare coding to very basic skills, like typing. Though there are probably many universities and colleges where students can get trained in typing, it’s very separate from the curriculum. It might be “college prep”, but it’s not really a college prerequisite. And there isn’t that much support in post-secondary education. Of course, there are many programs, in any discipline, giving a lot of weight to coding skills. For instance, learners in Digital Humanities probably hone in their ability to code, at some point in their career. And it’s probably hard for most digital arts programs to avoid at least some training in programming languages. It’s just that these “general” programs in coding tend to focus almost exclusively on so-called “K–12 Education”. That this program focuses on diversity is also interesting. Not surprising, as many such initiatives have to do with inequalities, real or perceived. But it might be where something so general can have an impact in Higher Education. It’s also interesting to notice that there isn’t much in terms of branding or otherwise which explicitly connects this initiative with colleges and universities. Pictures on the site show (diverse) adults, presumably registered students at universities and colleges where “education partners” are to be found. But it sounds like the idea of a “school” is purposefully left quite broad or even ambiguous. Of course, these programs might also benefit adult learners who aren’t registered at a formal institution of higher learning. Which would make it closer to “para-educational” programs. In fact, there might something of a lesson for the future of universities and colleges.

    2. As many universities are being queried by the federal government on how they spend their endowment money, and enrollment decreases among all institutions nationally, traditional campuses will need to look at these partnerships as a sign of where education is likely going in the future, and what the federal government may be willing to finance with its student loan programs going ahead.

      To me, the most interesting about this program is that it sounds like it’s targeting post-secondary institutions. There are multiple programs to “teach kids to code”. Compulsory education (primary and secondary) can provide a great context for these, in part because the type of learning involved is so broad and pedagogical skills are so recognized. In post-secondary contexts, however, there’s a strong tendency to limit coding to very specific contexts, including Computer Science or individual programs. We probably take for granted that people who need broad coding skills can develop them outside of their college and university programs. In a way, this isn’t that surprising if we’re to compare coding to very basic skills, like typing. Though there are probably many universities and colleges where students can get trained in typing, it’s very separate from the curriculum. It might be “college prep”, but it’s not really a college prerequisite. And there isn’t that much support in post-secondary education. Of course, there are many programs, in any discipline, giving a lot of weight to coding skills. For instance, learners in Digital Humanities probably hone in their ability to code, at some point in their career. And it’s probably hard for most digital arts programs to avoid at least some training in programming languages. It’s just that these “general” programs in coding tend to focus almost exclusively on so-called “K–12 Education”. That this program focuses on diversity is also interesting. Not surprising, as many such initiatives have to do with inequalities, real or perceived. But it might be where something so general can have an impact in Higher Education. It’s also interesting to notice that there isn’t much in terms of branding or otherwise which explicitly connects this initiative with colleges and universities. Pictures on the site show (diverse) adults, presumably registered students at universities and colleges where “education partners” are to be found. But it sounds like the idea of a “school” is purposefully left quite broad or even ambiguous. Of course, these programs might also benefit adult learners who aren’t registered at a formal institution of higher learning. Which would make it closer to “para-educational” programs. In fact, there might something of a lesson for the future of universities and colleges.

  15. Aug 2016
    1. Libraries like jQuery are useful because they hide the ugly details of dealing with cross-browser differences in JS engines. But these OO-helper libraries are different: they're going to great lengths to hide the true nature of JavaScript's OO mechanisms, instead masking them in a set of patterns that are more familiar to other languages.
    1. “Simplicity is about subtracting the obvious and adding the meaningful.” ~ John Maeda
    2. How it’s implemented doesn’t matter at all unless it’s implemented poorly.The only thing that matters in software development is that your users love the software.
  16. Jul 2016
    1. create their own interactive learning tools
    2. a way for children could to learn computer programming but more importantly even, a way of giving them a powerful object, a powerful tool to think with

      There’s a lot of ambivalence about recent projects which seek to involve coding in a broader educational context. There’s probably a lot of backlash to come against the STEM focus of many of these programs. At the same time, though, coding has become the de facto power tool in “our world”, for better or worse. Which is part of the reason it’s so interesting to trace, as Fred Turner famously did, the roots of “cyberculture” in the 1960s “counterculture”. In both cases, the “culture” part is rooted in a certain part of the United States which links two Bays (San Francisco and Massachusetts). Even the discourse on empowerment is part neoliberal, part anti-establishment.

  17. Jun 2016
    1. Two performances did seem to transcend the present, with artists sharing music that felt like open-source software to paths unknown. The first, Sam Aaron, played an early techno set to a small crowd, performing by coding live. His computer display, splayed naked on a giant screen, showcasedSonic Pi, the free software he invented. Before he let loose by revising lines of brackets, colons and commas, he typed:#This is Sonic Pi…..#I use it to teach people how to code#everything i do tonight, i can teach a 10 year old child…..His set – which sounded like Electric Café-era Kraftwerk, a little bit of Aphex Twin skitter and some Eighties electro – was constructed through typing and deleting lines of code. The shadowy DJ sets, knob-tweaking noise and fogbank ambient of many Moogfest performers was completely demystified and turned into simple numbers and letters that you could see in action. Dubbed "the live coding synth for everyone," it truly seemed less like a performance and more like an invitation to code your own adventure.
    2. The shadowy DJ sets, knob-tweaking noise and fogbank ambient of many Moogfest performers was completely demystified and turned into simple numbers and letters that you could see in action.
  18. Feb 2016
    1. In Silicon Valley, this divide is often explicit: As Kate Losse has noted, coders get high salary, prestige, and stock options. The people who do community management—on which the success of many tech companies is based—get none of those. It’s unsurprising that coding has been folded into "making." Consider the instant gratification of seeing "hello, world" on the screen; it’s nearly the easiest possible way to "make" things, and certainly one where failure has a very low cost. Code is "making" because we've figured out how to package it up into discrete units and sell it, and because it is widely perceived to be done by men.
  19. Nov 2015
    1. Without feedback, there are three options: I can believe, without evidence, that I am an awesome programmer.  I can believe, without evidence, that I am a terrible programmer and quit to go do something else.  Or finally, I can believe, without evidence, that I am a terrible programmer somehow successfully pretending to be an awesome programmer.

      This is a thoughtful, eloquent article. My main takeaway is that perfection is delusional, but good teamwork will overcome flaws and help everyone improve continually. All of these points are forms of feedback, or prerequisites to good feedback.

      • treat coworkers with respect
      • clear, open, honest communication
      • 3 code reviews before release
      • style guidelines
      • pair programming
      • unit tests
      • manual testing
      • user experience surveys
      • user experience analytics
  20. Sep 2015
    1. In programming languages like C++, C# or Java a class usually would be defined in a source code. A class definition file (Desktop.cpp/ Desktop.cs/ Desktop.java) in these languages would be a dumb text definition file fed into a compiler to verify and translate.In an interactive and lively system like Pharo a class could be created like any other object by sending instance creation methods. The reason is simple: in a pure OO environment anything is an object, so even a class is an object. Remember: there are only objects and messages.

      Una muestra de "live coding" (vía objetos) versus "static code" (vía archivos).

      An examples of "live coding" (via objects) versus "static code" (via files).

  21. Aug 2015
  22. Jul 2015
  23. Jun 2015
  24. Apr 2015
    1. Do you need to learn code to use The Grid? No coding is required to use The Grid. Just do what you're already doing on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc. Post images, video, and content to your site and our AI Designer will make it beautiful. If you know code, you can extend functionality using our platform tools and API.

      Coding skills are a plus but not necessary. Accessibility!...

  25. Jan 2015
    1. Edit, Compile, Execute and Share your C, C++, Java, Python, Perl, PHP, Node.js, Javascript, HTML-5 or any project in your social networks using simple links.

      Online kodlama, tutorial tüm diller var

  26. May 2014