155 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Nov 2022
  3. Oct 2022
    1. The firefox hypothes.is bookmarklet I use doesn’t seem to play nice with archive.org. There’s another I haven’t tested yet.

      I noticed the same thing. Does hypothes.is work with the Internet Archive in any scenario? I think it's a great tool and concept, but link rot limits it compared to saving pages and annotations locally (my preferred solution for that is Mark-It to turn a page into markdown or SingeFile to turn it into HTML and then adding highlights).

    1. Blu-menberg’s first collection of note cards dates back to the early 1940s butwas lost during the war; the Marbach collection contains cards from 1947onwards. 18

      18 Von Bülow and Krusche, “Vorla ̈ ufiges,” 273.

      Hans Blumenberg's first zettelkasten dates to the early 1940s, but was lost during the war though he continued the practice afterwards. The collection of his notes housed at Marbach dates from 1947 onward.

    1. Kaube, Jürgen. “Zettelkästen: Alles und noch viel mehr: Die gelehrte Registratur.” FAZ.NET, June 3, 2013. https://www.faz.net/aktuell/feuilleton/geisteswissenschaften/zettelkaesten-alles-und-noch-viel-mehr-die-gelehrte-registratur-12103104.html

    2. Nicht wenige Kästen sind nur für ein einziges Buch angelegt worden, Siegfried Kracauers Sammlungen etwa zu seiner Monographie über Jacques Offenbach, das Bildarchiv des Historikers Reinhart Koselleck mit Abteilungen Tausender Fotos von Reiterdenkmälern beispielsweise oder der Kasten des Romanisten Hans Robert Jauß, in dem er für seine Habilitationsschrift mittelalterliche Tiernamen und -eigenschaften verzettelte.

      machine translation (Google)

      Quite a few boxes have been created for just one book, Siegfried Kracauer's collections for his monograph on Jacques Offenbach, for example, the photo archive of the historian Reinhart Koselleck with sections of thousands of photos of equestrian monuments, for example, or the box by the Romanist Hans Robert Jauß, in which he wrote for his Habilitation dissertation bogged down medieval animal names and characteristics.

      A zettelkasten need not be a lifetime practice and historically many were created for supporting a specific project or ultimate work. Examples can be seen in the work of both Robert Green and his former assistant Ryan Holiday who kept separate collections for each of their books, as well as those displayed at the German Literature Archive in Marbach (2013) including Siegfried Kracauer (for a monograph on Jacques Offenbach), Reinhart Koselleck (equestrian related photos), Hans Robert Jauß (a dissertation on medieval animal names and characteristics).

  4. Sep 2022
  5. Aug 2022
    1. The Tegos Tapes is an interesting example of an obscure and heretofore unreleased Vangelis soundtrack unknown by many of even his most devoted fans.The Tegos Tapes were produced originally by the Greek medical professional Dr. Stergios Tegos, and contain educational examples of his microneurosurgery work. This VHS set of tapes was not intended for general release to the Public as these training videos were mainly intended for student surgeons in training or offered to other microneurosurgeons via Dr. Tegos exclusively.Dr. Tegos asked his close friend Vangelis to create a background soundtrack to accompany these videos and Vangelis agreed, composing nearly 8 hours of some of his more pleasing and ambient music. Dr. Tegos thought that a background musical score composed and performed by Vangelis himself would ease the monotony and dryness of the subject matter and help the viewer to focus more effectively.
    1. The Western archive is characterised by two types of knowledge organisation that are foreign to Indigenous knowledges: Firstly it is based on a strong sense of dualism; the use of oppositional categories such as man/woman; man (human)/nature; mind/matter; spirit/materiality, which again is expressed in time differentiated into past/present/future. Secondly knowledge is objectified; it is knowledge about, not with, and it is highly segmented into different areas of knowledge speciality that are in turn reflected in the education system and the professions and areas of government responsibility.
    2. Margo Neale (featured at right) suggests that the Songlines project can be conceived as a Third Archive, a bridge between the First Archive of Indigenous knowledges, kept alive in the songlines that crisscross Australia, and the Second Archive, that of the Western Knowledge system, imported into Australia through colonisation and settlement and transmitted through our education systems and institutions of government, business and civil society.
    1. https://www.kevinmarks.com/memex.html

      I got stuck over the weekend, so I totally missed Kevin Marks' memex demo at IndieWebCamp's Create Day, but it is an interesting little UI experiment.

      I'll always maintain that Vannevar Bush really harmed the first few generations of web development by not mentioning the word commonplace book in his conceptualization. Marks heals some of this wound by explicitly tying the idea of memex to that of the zettelkasten however. John Borthwick even mentions the idea of "networked commonplace books". [I suspect a little birdie may have nudged this perspective as catnip to grab my attention—a ruse which is highly effective.]

      Some of Kevin's conceptualization reminds me a bit of Jerry Michalski's use of The Brain which provides a specific visual branching of ideas based on the links and their positions on the page: the main idea in the center, parent ideas above it, sibling ideas to the right/left and child ideas below it. I don't think it's got the idea of incoming or outgoing links, but having a visual location on the page for incoming links (my own site has incoming ones at the bottom as comments or responses) can be valuable.

      I'm also reminded a bit of Kartik Prabhu's experiments with marginalia and webmention on his website which plays around with these ideas as well as their visual placement on the page in different methods.

      MIT MediaLab's Fold site (details) was also an interesting sort of UI experiment in this space.

      It also seems a bit reminiscent of Kevin Mark's experiments with hovercards in the past as well, which might be an interesting way to do the outgoing links part.

      Next up, I'd love to see larger branching visualizations of these sorts of things across multiple sites... Who will show us those "associative trails"?

      Another potential framing for what we're all really doing is building digital versions of Indigenous Australian's songlines across the web. Perhaps this may help realize Margo Neale and Lynne Kelly's dream for a "third archive"?

  6. Jul 2022
    1. National Emergency Library

      Internet Archive's National Emergency Library

      Also not CDL: no limit on simultaneous use, author opt-out, book must have been published more than 5 years prior.

  7. Jun 2022
    1. For Jerome Bruner, the place to begin is clear: “One starts somewhere—where the learner is.”

      One starts education with where the student is. But mustn't we also inventory what tools and attitudes the student brings? What tools beyond basic literacy do they have? (Usually we presume literacy, but rarely go beyond this and the lack of literacy is too often viewed as failure, particularly as students get older.) Do they have motion, orality, song, visualization, memory? How can we focus on also utilizing these tools and modalities for learning.

      Link to the idea that Donald Trump, a person who managed to function as a business owner and president of the United States, was less than literate, yet still managed to function in modern life as an example. In fact, perhaps his focus on oral modes of communication, and the blurrable lines in oral communicative meaning (see [[technobabble]]) was a major strength in his communication style as a means of rising to power?

      Just as the populace has lost non-literacy based learning and teaching techniques so that we now consider the illiterate dumb, stupid, or lesser than, Western culture has done this en masse for entire populations and cultures.

      Even well-meaning educators in the edtech space that are trying to now center care and well-being are completely missing this piece of the picture. There are much older and specifically non-literate teaching methods that we have lost in our educational toolbelts that would seem wholly odd and out of place in a modern college classroom. How can we center these "missing tools" as educational technology in a modern age? How might we frame Indigenous pedagogical methods as part of the emerging third archive?

      Link to: - educational article by Tyson Yunkaporta about medical school songlines - Scott Young article "You should pay for Tutors"


      aside on serendipity

      As I was writing this note I had a toaster pop up notification in my email client with the arrival of an email by Scott Young with the title "You should pay for Tutors" which prompted me to add a link to this note. It reminds me of a related idea that Indigenous cultures likely used information and knowledge transfer as a means of payment (Lynne Kelly, Knowledge and Power). I have commented previously on the serendipity of things like auto correct or sparks of ideas while reading as a means of interlinking knowledge, but I don't recall experiencing this sort of serendipity leading to combinatorial creativity as a means of linking ideas,

    2. From the classroom, to the street, to the Internet, Eric’s voice carried, and carried within it the possibility of a kind of education–amplified with digital technologies– that enables other human beings to become conscious, to become responsible, to learn.

      Sadly, we seem to have othered orality and cultural practices which don't fit into the Western literate cultural box. This prevents us from moving forward as a society and a diverse culture.

      In the 90's rap was culturally appropriated by some because of its perception as "cool" within the culture. Can this coolness be leveraged as a reintroduction of oral methods in our culture without the baggage of the appropriation? Can it be added to enhance the evolving third archive? As a legitimate teaching tool?

    1. Even if the original webpage disappears, you can often use this informationto locate an archived version using the Wayback Machine, a project of theInternet Archive that preserves a record of websites: https://archive.org/web/.

      It would be useful to suggest here:

      Ideally one's note taking applications would automatically archive web pages to the Internet Archive as you take notes from them. This means that if they should disappear in the future, you'd have recourse to a useful and workable back up.

    1. We write on behalf of plaintiffs Hachette Book Group, Inc., HarperCollins PublishersLLC, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and Penguin Random House LLC (the “Plaintiffs”) to request apre-motion summary judgment conference pursuant to Individual Practice 2(B).

      Purpose of Letter

    1. I write on behalf of Defendant Internet Archive pursuant to Paragraph 2-B of Your Honor’s IndividualPractices to request a pre-motion conference on a motion for summary judgment in the above matter.

      A letter from the law firm representing the Internet Archives that summarizes the four-point fair use argument and details the extraordinary circumstances behind the the IA's National Emergency Library.

      Hachette Book Group, Inc. et al. v. Internet Archive, Case No. 1:20-CV-04160-JGK

      RECAP's archive of the docket from PACER

    1. There's so much missing Indigenous context in this article. How can we better juxtapose and sort the cultural differences while trying to build a "Third Archive" to save Indigenous knowledge and languages?

      https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/native-american-language-preservation-rcna31396

      Syndicated copy: http://stream.boffosocko.com/2022/theres-so-much-missing-indigenous-context-in-this-article-how

    2. https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/native-american-language-preservation-rcna31396

      Should outsiders attempting to preserve Indigenous knowledge, histories, or language be allowed to make money off of their work?

    3. “So I’m supposed to ask the Lakota Language Consortium if I can use my own Lakota language,” Taken Alive asked in one of many TikTok posts that would come to define his social media presence. 

      Based on some beyond the average knowledge of Indigenous cultures, I'm reading some additional context into this statement that is unlikely to be seen or understood by those with Western-only cultural backgrounds who view things from an ownership and capitalistic perspective.

      There's a stronger sense of identity and ownership of language and knowledge within oral traditions than can be understood by Westerners who didn't grow up with it.

      He obviously feels like we're stealing from him all over again. We need better rules and shared definitions between Indigenous peoples and non before embarking on these sorts of projects.

  8. May 2022
    1. json { "@context": "http://schema.org", "@type": "ArchiveOrganization", "name": "Example Archives", "@id": "http://examplearchive.org", "archiveHeld": { "@type": ["ArchiveComponent","Collection"], "@id": "http://examplearchive.org/coll1", "name": "Example Archive Collection", "collectionSize": 1, "holdingArchive": "http://examplearchive.org", "hasPart": { "@type": ["ArchiveComponent","Manuscript"], "@id": "http://examplearchive.org/item1", "name": "Interesting Manuscript", "description": "Interesting manuscript - on loan to the British Library", "itemLocation": "http://bl.uk", "isPartOf": "http://examplearchive.org/coll1" } } }`

  9. Apr 2022
    1. The IETF provides an IMAP interface into the email list archives. This interface allows both anonymous and logged-in access.

      ``` Server: imap.ietf.org Port: 143 or 993

      For authenticated access use your datatracker login and password.

      For anonymous access use username="anonymous", and provide your email address as a password. ```

    1. IMAP subscriptions: An IMAP server with all IETF email list archives is available for IMAP access at imap.ietf.org:993.
    1. The recorded memories madepossible by various technological prostheses or memory supportsStiegler refers to as ‘tertiary memory’.

      What relation does Stiegler's 'tertiary memory' have with respect to the 'third archive' if we mix these two together?

  10. Mar 2022
    1. Archival Resource Keys (ARKs) serve as persistent identifiers, or stable, trusted references for information objects. Among other things, they aim to be web addresses (URLs) that don’t return 404 Page Not Found errors.
  11. Feb 2022
  12. Jan 2022
    1. 4. Robustifying a link when linking to a specific version

      If the main intent is to link to a specific state of an original resource, for example a snapshot of the original resource in a web archive or one of its version in a version control system, then Robust Link information is conveyed as follows:

      • href for the URI that provides the specific state i.e., the snapshot or resource version;
      • data-originalurl for the URI of the original resource;
      • data-versiondate for the datetime of the snapshot or resource version.

      [...]

      <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Web_archiving&oldid=485347845"
         data-originalurl="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_archiving"
         data-versiondate="2012-03-20">Robust Link to this specific version of the Wikipedia page</a>
      
    2. 3. Robustifying a link when linking to the original resource

      If the main intent is to link to an original resource but also allow future users of that link to see the state of the original resource around the time the link was put in place, then Robust Link information is conveyed as follows:

      • href for the URI of the original resource for which the snapshot was taken;
      • data-versionurl for the URI of the snapshot;
      • data-versiondate for the datetime of linking, of taking the snapshot.

      [...]

      <a href="http://www.w3.org/"
         data-versionurl="https://archive.today/r7cov"
         data-versiondate="2015-01-21">Robust Link to the W3C home page</a>
      
    3. The approach proposed here is to convey this information on a link by leveraging HTML5's attribute extensibility mechanism. It introduces the following data- attributes for the anchor (<a>) element:

      • data-originalurl for the URI of the original resource;
      • data-versionurl for the URI of the snapshot;
      • data-versiondate for the datetime of linking, of taking the snapshot.
    4. Robust Links provide multiple pathways to revisit a link's original content, even a long time after the link was put in place. This document describes approaches to robustify links in HTML pages. All approaches assume that, when linking to a web resource, a snapshot of the state of that resource is created, for example, in a web archive or a versioning system. When linking, the URI of the resource, the URI of the snapshot, and the datetime of linking are conveyed.
  13. Dec 2021
    1. WARC Format

      The WARC format is the raw data from the crawl, providing a direct mapping to the crawl process. Not only does the format store the HTTP response from the websites it contacts (WARC-Type: response), it also stores information about how that information was requested (WARC-Type: request) and metadata on the crawl process itself (WARC-Type: metadata).

      For the HTTP responses themselves, the raw response is stored. This not only includes the response itself, what you would get if you downloaded the file, but also the HTTP header information, which can be used to glean a number of interesting insights.

      In the example below, we can see the crawler contacted http://102jamzorlando.cbslocal.com/tag/nba/page/2/ and received a HTML page in response. We can also see the page was served from the nginx web server and that a special header has been added, X-hacker, purely for the purposes of advertising to a very specific audience of programmers who might look at the HTTP headers!

      WARC/1.0
      WARC-Type: response
      WARC-Date: 2013-12-04T16:47:32Z
      WARC-Record-ID: 
      Content-Length: 73873
      Content-Type: application/http; msgtype=response
      WARC-Warcinfo-ID: 
      WARC-Concurrent-To: 
      WARC-IP-Address: 23.0.160.82
      WARC-Target-URI: http://102jamzorlando.cbslocal.com/tag/nba/page/2/
      WARC-Payload-Digest: sha1:FXV2BZKHT6SQ4RZWNMIMP7KMFUNZMZFB
      WARC-Block-Digest: sha1:GMYFZYSACNBEGHVP3YFQNOSTV5LPXNAU
      
      HTTP/1.0 200 OK
      Server: nginx
      Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8
      Vary: Accept-Encoding
      Vary: Cookie
      X-hacker: If you're reading this, you should visit automattic.com/jobs and apply to join the fun, mention this header.
      Content-Encoding: gzip
      Date: Wed, 04 Dec 2013 16:47:32 GMT
      Content-Length: 18953
      Connection: close
      
      
      ...HTML Content...
      
  14. Nov 2021
  15. Oct 2021
  16. Sep 2021
  17. Aug 2021
  18. Jul 2021
    1. A solid overview article about the architectural deficiencies of the web for long term archival and access as well as some ideas for fixing the issue and a plea to attempt to make things better for the future.

    2. Suppose Google were to change what’s on that page, or reorganize its website anytime between when I’m writing this article and when you’re reading it, eliminating it entirely. Changing what’s there would be an example of content drift; eliminating it entirely is known as link rot.

      We don't talk about content drift very much. I like that some sites, particularly wiki sites, actually document their content drift in diffs and surface that information directly to the user. Why don't we do this for more websites? The Wayback machine also has this sort of feature.

    1. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_mynewgig.mp3
    2. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_mcgraw.mp3
    3. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_burbeck.mp3
    4. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_gemignani.mp3
    5. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_rosenfeld.mp3
    6. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_frost.mp3
    7. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_idehen.mp3
    8. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_HillMcFarland.mp3
    9. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_linqMay06.mp3
    10. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_singleton.mp3
    11. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_martinez.mp3
    12. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_rodgers.mp3
    13. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_rayhill.mp3
    14. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_dcstat.mp3"
    15. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_hudack.mp3
    16. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_glushko.mp3
    17. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_patrick.mp3
    18. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_mayfield.mp3
    19. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_xbrl.mp3
    20. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_suber.mp3
    21. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_fielding.mp3
    22. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_windley.mp3
    23. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_navizon.mp3"
    24. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_fahlberg.mp3
    25. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_ullman.mp3
    26. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_ericson.mp3
    27. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_liu.mp3
    28. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_schneider.mp3
    29. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_russell.mp3
    30. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_securent.mp3
    31. http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/gems/ju_wilkin.mp3
  19. Jun 2021
    1. For example, the Wikipedia article on Martin Luther King, Jr cites the book To Redeem the Soul of America, by Adam Fairclough. That citation now links directly to page 299 inside the digital version of the book provided by the Internet Archive. There are 66 cited and linked books on that article alone. 

      I'd love to have a commonplace book robot that would do this sort of linking process within it for me. In the meanwhile, I continue to plod along.

      This article was referenced today at [[I Annotate 2021]] by [[Mark Graham]].

    1. If you find a suitable archive URL, then you can add it to the citation. If the citation uses one of the common templates (e.g. {{cite web}}, {{cite news}}, {{Citation}}), then you can edit as follows: Leave the |url= unchanged, pointing to the source URL. Add |archive-url=, pointing to the archive URL. Add |archive-date=, specifying the date when the archived copy was saved. YYYY-MM-DD format is usually easiest but any format can be used. Add or change |url-status=. Use |url-status=dead if the old URL does not work. Use |url-status=unfit or |url-status=usurped if the old URL has been usurped for the purposes of spam, advertising, or is otherwise unsuitable. Use |url-status=live if |url= still works and still gives the correct information, but you want to preemptively add an |archive-url=. Leave the |access-date= unchanged, referring to the date when a previous editor last accessed the |url=. Some editors believe |access-date= should be removed once a working |archive-url= is established since the |url= is no longer available, maintaining an |access-date= is redundant clutter.
    1. In Plato’s Phaedrus, Socrates bemoaned the development of writing. He feared that, as people came to rely on the written word as a substitute for the knowledge they used to carry inside their heads, they would, in the words of one of the dialogue’s characters, “cease to exercise their memory and become forgetful.” And because they would be able to “receive a quantity of information without proper instruction,” they would “be thought very knowledgeable when they are for the most part quite ignorant.” They would be “filled with the conceit of wisdom instead of real wisdom.” Socrates wasn’t wrong—the new technology did often have the effects he feared—but he was shortsighted. He couldn’t foresee the many ways that writing and reading would serve to spread information, spur fresh ideas, and expand human knowledge (if not wisdom).

      I feel like Western culture has lost so much of our memory traditions that this trite story, which I've seen often repeated, doesn't have the weight it should.

      Why can't we simultaneously have the old system AND the new? Lynne Kelly and Margo Neale touch on this in their coinage of the third archive in Songlines.

  20. Apr 2021
    1. What about seed banks? There have been efforts to try to ensure that not only the most popular seeds survive. Let’s call these seed banks, where the more rare gems are maintained and passed on as generational wealth.
  21. Mar 2021
  22. Feb 2021
    1. This project is somewhat related to getmemex.com

      Zegnat et al.: FYI WorldBrain's Memex (= getmemex.com) has some shared history with my WebMemex project; we collaborated for some months, then went in somewhat different directions; I focussed on web page snapshotting for a while, and got distracted with other things; WorldBrain's version added more and more features and got a lot closer to what I had in mind for WebMemex. — via treora # 21:34 on 2021-02-12

    2. A browser extension for archiving web pages locally.

    1. The idea of a purely linear text is a myth; readers stitch together meanings in much more complex ways than we have traditionally imagined; the true text is more of a network than a single, fixed document.

      The internet isn't a new invention, it's just a more fixed version of the melange of text, ideas, and thought networks that have existed over human existence.

      First there was just the memory and indigenous peoples all over the world creating vast memory palaces to interconnect their thoughts. (cross reference the idea of ancients thinking much the way we do now from the fist episode or so of Literature and History)

      Then we invite writing and texts which help us in terms of greater storage without the work or relying solely on memory. This reaches it's pinnacle in the commonplace book and the ideas of Llull's combinatorial thought.

      Finally we've built the Internet which interconnects so much more.

      But now we need to go back and revisit the commonplace book and memory techniques to tie them altogether. Perhaps Lynne Kelly's concept of The Third Archive is what we should perfect next until another new instantiation comes to augment the system.

    1. Missing Archive, missing narrative? Where is the archive of Palestine, and who owns it? How did the missing archive create a void in the Palestinian narrative and what did the Palestinians do to compensate this? In her films, Mahasen Nasser Eldin does not only search for the archive but connects it to the present in an attempt to contribute to restoring the Palestinian memory and narrative. “Civilizations that write history are often remembered by the cultural heritage they leave for future generations. Therefore, the preservation of audio-visual heritage should be considered a national duty. Whoever controls archives and cultural collections decisively influences the writing of history – a principle that has been in evidence since antiquity.” Dr. Bashar Shammout, scholar on Palestinian archives
    1. It’s 1936, C.L.R. James is in Paris: “I look up in the archives. I look up, I look up, I look up in the archives, I spend three or four months looking up in the archives.” James’ friend Harry Spencer had given him seventy-five pounds to go to France and work in the Archives Nationales. “Every morning, walk up the Seine, the bank of Seine, go to the archives... At twelve o’clock they shut down, everywhere is closed up till tow. Archives close up, ‘St. James” closes up, off to eat. Very fine. At two o’clock, I go back. I work. The archives close at five or six. I go home.” James was in the archives because he was writing the history of the Haitian Revolution. Published in London in 1938, the bibliography of The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L’Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution lists some eight archives consulted between France, Haiti, and Great Britain among many other printed primary and secondary sources. But even for the best historians and the most finely crafted (and critical) histories, the archive of the oppressed can be hard to find.
  23. Jan 2021
    1. Ever since a certain car salesman tweeted “Use Signal”

      I've seen this linking pattern once or twice before in the wild. This is an obvious subtweet of Elon Musk, but the link is an archived version of a Tweet that is mirrored through Nitter. This is done to ensure that the original Tweet link is as heavily demoted as possible.

  24. Dec 2020
    1. In Elkhart and other jurisdictions, not all proceedings have gone remote.

      why don't u just admit you have a golden goose and never to do any real work again.

  25. Nov 2020
  26. Oct 2020
    1. every page on my blog contains a link to its archive in the page footer. This ensures that you can not only browse the latest version of all of my blog articles in case of a server breakdown. This also enables you to browse all previous version, probably changed over time. Go ahead, try a few "Archive" links of my articles. If any of my articles start with an "Updates:" section, you know for sure that there are older versions accessible via the Internet Archive.

      This is an interesting pattern. How could one make this more obvious from a uI perspective?

    1. time travel back to pre-product-market-fit Twitter

      Want to see what your Twitter timeline would've looked like 10 years ago today, if you followed all the same people you do now? https://t.co/41a6iQcYhc

      — Andy Baio (@waxpancake) May 24, 2018

      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
  27. Sep 2020
    1. The Chelicerae popped up on the occasional paranormal site or edgy message board, each time accompanied by a now-defunct link. According to those who followed such things, all you had to do was start a new thread as a Guest, something Greg had been instructed to make sure was possible, and the title of that thread should be the name of someone you want dead. As the stories went, you would receive a reply almost immediately, and it would simply ask you for a story. You would have to write out, and post, in full, a horrible event that had happened to you, or someone that you loved. All the instructions were very clear that the target would only die, if the account satisfied the “Story-spinner.” None of them made any mention of what would happen if it did not.
  28. Aug 2020
  29. May 2020
  30. Apr 2020
  31. Mar 2020
  32. Feb 2020
  33. Jan 2020
  34. Dec 2019
    1. For most of my bookmarks, likes, reads, etc. I use a plugin that scrapes my post and saves a copy of the contents of all the URLs on my page to the Internet Archive so that even in the event of a site death, a copy of the content is saved for me for a later date.

      Chris, I was wondering what plugin you use to store copies of the links to Archive.org?

    1. One of the questions that came up during the SPLOT workshop is if there’s a SPLOT for podcasting, which reminded me of this post Adam Croom wrote a while back about his podcasting workflow: “My Podcasting Workflow with Amazon S3.” . We’re always on the look-out for new SPLOTs to bring to the Reclaim masses, and it would be cool to have an example that moves beyond WordPress just to make the point a SPLOT is not limited to WordPress (as much as we love it) —so maybe Adam and I can get the band back together

      I just outlined a tiny and relatively minimal/free way to host and create a podcast feed last night: https://boffosocko.com/2019/12/17/55761877/

      I wonder if this could be used to create a SPLOT that isn't WordPress based potentially using APIs from the Internet Archive and Huffduffer? WordPress-based infrastructure could be used to create it certainly and aggregation could be done around tags. It looks like the Huffduffer username SPLOT is available.

  35. Nov 2019
  36. Oct 2019
  37. Sep 2019
  38. Aug 2019
    1. oduction. It’s quite likely that you may have read - and even annotated - the book while in high school. We do knTroy Hicks1 week agoPerhaps… if it wasn’t issued to you by a teacher or, as my literature teacher did, we were required to buy copies for ourselves so we could, indeed, destroy our own property and not the school’s. Of course, now we have https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/84, and annotation is quite possible across a variety of forms.

      Or perhaps, even more fun, the Shelley-Goodwin Archive has a digital copy of the original text which preserves the original handwritten text as well as the editorial annotations!!

  39. Oct 2018