154 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Oct 2020
    1. The Instapaper highlights go to my Evernote inbox, then I copy them from Evernote into Roam (annoying, I know, hopefully the Roam API will be set up soon!) 

      Getting data into any of these note taking tools quickly always seems to be the most difficult part of the process.

    1. As I read this while thinking about the context of the IndieWeb and it's wiki, I'm thinking two cognitively dissonant thoughts: 1. The current technical uses are creating content more for themselves and their research and use and 2. They're not creating it to help out the users who may necessarily need a ladder or a bigger platform to get to where they are.

      It's going to take a layer of intermediate users, creators, or builders to help create a better path to bring the neophytes up to a higher level to get more out of the wealth of information that's hiding in it. Or it's going to take helpers and mentors to slowly build them up to that point.

      How can we more consistently reach a hand down to pull up those coming after us? How can we encourage others to do some of the same?

    1. Friction in UX can be a powerful tool, part of what I’m trying to find is where I want to retain friction as it helps me remain intentional.
    1. I think it is one of those topics with a lot of conjecture John. Apologies if there are too many links.

      Don't apologize for links. It's the web and links are important. In fact I might think that you could have a few additional links here! I would have seen it anyway, but I was a tad sad not to have seen a link to that massive pullquote/photo you made at the top of the post which would have sent me a webmention to boot. (Of course WordPress doesn't make it easy on this front either, so your best bet would have been an invisible <link> hidden in the text maybe?)

      I've been in the habit of person-tagging people in posts to actively send them webmentions, but I also have worried about the extra "visual clutter" and cognitive load of the traditional presentation of links as mentioned by John. As a result, I'm now considering adding some CSS to my site so that these webmention links simply look like regular text. This way the notifications will be triggered, but without adding the seeming "cruft" visually or cognitively. Win-win? Thanks for the inspiration!

      In your case here, you've kindly added enough context about what to expect about the included links that the reader can decide for themselves while still making your point. You should sleep easily on this point and continue linking to your heart's content.

    1. Although I’ve already got a blog (you’re reading it!), I decided not to mirror my book reviews here. I post normal content so infrequently that anyone who wanted to read the blog but wasn’t interested in book reviews would be inundated with content they didn’t want. In the end, I spun up an additional WordPress instance on my web space (something that my host, Krystal Hosting, makes very easy to do) to keep the reviews completely isolated from everything else.

      This seems to be a frequent excuse for people to spin up yet another website rather than attempting to tackle the UI subscription problem.

      Social readers would be well advised to think about this problem so people could have a single website with multiple types/kinds of content.

      Platforms should better delineate how to allow publishers and readers to more easily extract the posts that they're interested in following.

    1. What’s the difference between a digital garden, a note-taking app, and a blog? You can see the digital garden sitting between the former and the latter. It’s a place to share your evergreen notes—not raw notes you may have stored in your note-taking app, but not quite the level of polish you would expect on a blog. Creating a digital garden is a great way to receive early feedback on your ideas. Over time, several posts in your digital garden may be combined to create longer essays to post on your blog, but it won’t necessarily be the case.

      Anne-Laure defines a third "thing" known as a digital garden sitting in between a private note-taking/thinking tool and a blog. She calls it here a digital garden.

      The idea is interesting, but requires some additional work to create the third thing, which is okay for those who'd want it.

      In some sense, I'm more likely to create just a single thing that does all three functionalities and not worry too much about the public/private portions. I'm not opposed to maintaining all three, though it will require a tool that has the pre-built UI to make maintaining them all simple. Otherwise, I'm not sure the manual work would work for me.

    1. While I lament the loss of some of the artistry of the early web and lay much of the blame at the feet of blogging platforms like WordPress, such platforms also opened the web to far more people who would not have otherwise been able to create a website. Democratizing publishing is a far loftier goal than dropping animated GIFs across personal spaces.

      WordPress has done a lot to democratize publishing and make portions of it easier, but has it gone too far in crystalizing the form of things by not having more wiki-like or curation-based features?

    2. Throughout the platform’s history, end-users have remained at the mercy of their WordPress theme. Most themes are built around what WordPress allows out of the box. They follow a similar formula. Some may have a fancy homepage or other custom page templates. But, on the whole, themes have been primarily built around the idea of a blog. Such themes do not give the user true control over where to place things on their website. While some developers have attempted solutions to this, most have never met the towering goal of putting the power of HTML and CSS into the hands of users through a visual interface. This lack of tools has given rise to page builders and the block editor.

      an apropos criticsm

    1. I’m really not sure if linking, in general, has changed over the years. I’ve been doing it the same since day one. But that’s just me.

      Only in the last hour I've had a thought about a subtle change to one of the ways I link. It's not a drastic thing, but it is a subtle change to common practices. Also as I think about it, it removes some of the obviousness of links on social platforms like Twitter that add the ugly @ to a username in addition to other visual changes when one mentions someone else.

    1. Instagram, despite not having any official reshare option, allows near unlimited hashtag spamming, and that allows for more deterministic, self-generated distribution. Twitter also isn't as great for spreading visual memes because of its stubborn attachment to cropping photos to maintain a certain level of tweet density per phone screen.

      Some interesting UI clues here that either help or hamper social networks

    2. I think the Stories format is a genuine innovation on the social modesty problem of social networks. That is, all but the most egregious showoffs feel squeamish about publishing too much to their followers. Stories, by putting the onus on the viewer to pull that content, allows everyone to publish away guilt-free, without regard for the craft that regular posts demand in the ever escalating game that is life publishing. In a world where algorithmic feeds break up your sequence of posts, Stories also allow gifted creators to create sequential narratives.
    1. I find it somewhat interesting to note that with 246 public annotations on this page using Hypothes.is, that from what I can tell as of 4/2/2019 only one of them is a simple highlight. All the rest are highlights with an annotation or response of some sort.

      It makes me curious to know what the percentage distribution these two types have on the platform. Is it the case that in classroom settings, which many of these annotations appear to have been made, that much of the use of the platform dictates more annotations (versus simple highlights) due to the performative nature of the process?

      Is it possible that there are a significant number of highlights which are simply hidden because the platform automatically defaults these to private? Is the friction of making highlights so high that people don't bother?

      I know that Amazon will indicate heavily highlighted passages in e-books as a feature to draw attention to the interest relating to those passages. Perhaps it would be useful/nice if Hypothes.is would do something similar, but make the author of the highlights anonymous? (From a privacy perspective, this may not work well on articles with a small number of annotators as the presumption could be that the "private" highlights would most likely be directly attributed to those who also made public annotations.

      Perhaps the better solution is to default highlights to public and provide friction-free UI to make them private?

      A heavily highlighted section by a broad community can be a valuable thing, but surfacing it can be a difficult thing to do.

    1. The sidebar is styled white

      I do like how you've changed the styling a little bit. Being able to have the style fit the particular website is an interesting idea.

    1. Especially on mobile.

      I've found in the past that highlighting on Chrome for Android was nearly impossible. I've switched to using Firefox when I need to use hypothes.is on mobile.

    1. Art by O’Hare and Bell highlight - both visually and conceptually - the dialogic quality of annotation expressing power.

      While I'm reading this, I can't help but wishing that Hypothes.is would add a redaction functionality to their product. They could potentially effect it by using the highlighter functionality, but changing the CSS to have the color shown be the same as that of the (body) text instead of being yellow.

    1. Events
    2. While you could use a map function for loops they aren't optimized.
    3. Solid supports spread operator on native elements and Components.
    4. In general it is recommended you handle forms in this "controlled" manner. In some cases it might make sense to manage the form state outside of Solid via refs. These "uncontrolled" forms can also work. Just be conscious of the difference as mixing approaches can lead to unexpected results.
    1. Wait what? No runtime. How does that work? Well, obviously JavaScript executes at runtime, so was he saying he doesn't reuse any code? Well as it turns out the message here has changed. I looked and sure enough there was a runtime. Of course there was.
    2. Do we need another JS UI Library?
    1. The demand for top-notch app UI designers is so high that nowadays, companies hire UI designers explicitly separate from the development team. This way, they can be sure that the app gets the best designing resources.

      We often come across stunning apps; some catch our eyes for their color palette while some have unique transition effects, and so on. So, let’s find out what will be the most popular UI design trends of 2020.

  3. Sep 2020
  4. Aug 2020
    1. I found that many people have bad experience when it comes to styling in Material-UI, so I want to help them overcome that point and see the beauty of it.
    1. To the fact, 77% of the users will stop using an app within 3 days of its download. Only those apps will survive who have soothing mobile usability and UX/UI designs.
    1. So, let’s get an answer to this question! In this write-up, we will be going through mobile app design services and its cost.

    1. Merge is a revolutionary technology that lets users import and keep in sync coded React.js components from GIT repositories to the UXPin Editor. Imported components are 100% identical to the components used by developers during the development process. It means that components are going to look, feel and function (interactions, data) just like the real product experienced by the end-users.
  5. Jul 2020
    1. Imagine that instead of a dropdown containing the search results, you want a tag-like list of search results that always display:
  6. Apr 2020
    1. Web Sitesi Kullanıcı Deneyimini Etkileyen 4 Temel Faktör İnternet var olduğu sürece, kullanılabilirlik ve kullanıcı deneyimi her web sitesinin ayrılmaz bir parçası olacaktır. Dahası, rekabetçi ortam sayesinde, işletmelerin iyi tasarlanmış ve işlevsel bir web sitesine sahip olmalarının yanı sıra dijital ortamda başarılı olmak istiyorlarsa kullanılabilirlik ve UX hakkında ayrıntılı bir anlayışa sahip olmaları her zamankinden daha önemlidir.
    1. UI ve UX Tasarımın Farkları UI ve UX Tasarım, web sitenizi kullanıcı deneyimine uygun olarak geliştiriyor. Fakat her ne kadar aynı şey olduğu düşünülse de bu iki tasarım aynı hizmeti vermiyor. UX tasarım içinde IU tasarımı da barındırıyor. Birbirleri ile bağlantılı olan UX tasarım ve UI tasarım, farklı sorulara farklı cevaplar veriyor.
    1. İyi bir web sitesi ile kötü bir web sitesi arasındaki en büyük fark kullanıcı arayüzü ve kullanıcı deneyimidir. İyi web siteleri basit ve kullanıcı dostu bir düzene sahip olsa da, kötü web sitelerinde gezinmek çoğumuz için bir acıdır. Bir web sitesini kötü yapan nedir?
  7. Mar 2020
  8. Feb 2020
    1. Top 10 Design Skills Every UX/UI Designer Must Have

      You might have got this in your mind while hiring UX/UI designers that what skills should they possess. To give you a clear idea on it, here I’ve listed a few UX/UI design skills, that every designer must-have.

  9. Jan 2020
  10. Dec 2019
    1. At Excellent Webworld our UI/UX designers are always experimenting with the innovative design in buttons and navigation bars. Here is an interactive tab animation for our previous mobile app development project.

  11. Nov 2019
    1. Since the checkbox is rendering an input I would work with it rather than focusing on the image. You could do something like this: const checkbox = getByTestId('checkbox-1234').querySelector('input[type="checkbox"]') expect(checkbox).toHaveProperty('checked', true)
    2. the way Material UI works is it renders a different SVG when the checkbox is clicked, and not changing the attributes or anything on the actual input element. So how do I actually test that the element is checked in line with the react-testing-library philosophy?

      These tags belong to entire page. This quote is just supporting evidence for the tags.

    1. This blog is aimed to help you figure out the most common UX fails that breakdown the mobile experience. Make sure to learn from the mistakes done by others and create a UX that would be loved and appreciated by the majority of your target audience.

    1. I wonder, what else do we need files for?

      interestingly with it's then new mobile devices that's what apple thought! they came to this from ui / "sales" perspective though

    2. Querying a database for Jan 1994 sales, and clicking on folders "Sales", "1994", "January" are very related activities. Why can't a "real" database then take over a file system entirely?

      the clicking on folder is probably the answer why, it's something that's tied closely to it's user interface

  12. Oct 2019
    1. Styling a Reach component feels similar to styling any native element. There are no themes and you don't have to prescribe to any specific approach to styling. There are some basic styles to make the components usable off-the-shelf, but you can override and add to them with stylesheets, styled components, emotion, glamor, whatever you want.
    2. "Element" SelectorsEach component has a data-reach-* attribute on the underlying DOM element that you can think of as the "element" for the component.
  13. Sep 2019
    1. Now You Know- How to Make A Live Streaming App

      With the advancements in smartphone camera technology, ease of internet access, and the emergence of social media sites specifically dedicated to watching videos, it is obvious that video is going to take over the internet. Know about how to build a live streaming app.

  14. Aug 2019
    1. Customization of the TextField can be cumbersome with the classes API, where you have to define the the classes prop. It's easier to use the default values, as described above. For example:

      It's surprising that they show an example using styled-components, which is a competing style library to their own @material-ui/styles, and even admit that this might be preferred over using the classes API, which they admit may be cumbersome.

      I like that they are open-minded enough to acknowledge that there are cases where built-in API may be too cumbersome, and even show examples of using styled-components.

    1. Demonstrates how label text will wrap at a point that appears to narrow when shrunk (the label can't even be as wide as the input it is labeling!), and how to work around this problem by adding styles:

        '& label': {
          whiteSpace: 'nowrap'
        }
      

      Of course, you would only want to do this if you are going to only be showing the label in shrunk state (which I think is safe to say is the case for date picker inputs), since it would look bad to actually have text overflowing outside of the input box. But if it's in "shrink" state, then it's actually above the input, so as long as there isn't another input/label directly to the right, and/or as long as we adjust the width so the right side of the label mostly lines up with the right side of the input, then I think we should be safe.

      Reference

      The input label "shrink" state isn't always correct. The input label is supposed to shrink as soon as the input is displaying something. In some circumstances, we can't determine the "shrink" state (number input, datetime input, Stripe input). You might notice an overlap.

      To workaround the issue, you can force the "shrink" state of the label.

      You need to make sure that the input is larger than the label to display correctly.

    1. A modern editorContributing to a knowledge base shouldn’t require technical expertise or esoteric formatting knowledge. We’ve created a WYSIWYG editor to lower the barrier to entry and encourage more people to participate globally.We have built speedy citation tools into Golden and intend to create more affordances around claim validation. You can simply highlight any claim and add a citation that is evidence to support that claim. All of these citations can then be easily viewed and examined by anyone viewing the article on Golden. We have gone a little step further by allowing ‘high resolution’ citations i.e. being able to highlight the specific part of the claim you want to back up. Over time, we want to have tighter bindings between claims and evidence in order to improve claim verification.

      This looks great!

  15. Jun 2019
    1. Фильтрация предполагает, что количество записей, после её применения, изменится. Формулировка кнопок фильтрации должна отвечать на вопрос «Что я получу после применения фильтрации?»: новое, мои записи, рестораны, непрочитанные письма и т. д. Применение сортировки не изменяет количество записей. Записи лишь меняют свой порядок. Формулировка должна отвечать на вопрос «По какому принципу упорядочены записи?»: по дате публикации, по рейтингу, в случайном порядке.
  16. May 2019
    1. Moreover, digital collections can reorder themselves on the fly with interfaces that accommodate diverse audiences. The research interface for a fifth grader should not be the same as that for a professional historian. By starting off as virtual, the Obama library has the potential to rethink how we present, in multiple ways, the vast record of the presidency, to grade schoolers, amateur enthusiasts, casual browsers, and many others. Presidential libraries have always had those different audiences, but going digital-first can make this much more of a reality than a fixed physical space or the often fairly basic websites of existing libraries—all of which were designed for an age of laptops and desktop computers, now a poor baseline when most online visitors access these sites through their smartphone.

      This is an interesting point, but it also presupposes that some staff is going to be building these various interfaces. Who will that be? How will they be supported? It's a whole new level of administration that a library needs to face.

  17. Apr 2019
  18. Feb 2019