245 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. I like the differentiation that Jared has made here on his homepage with categories for "fast" and "slow".

      It's reminiscent of the system 1 (fast) and system2 (slow) ideas behind Kahneman and Tversky's work in behavioral economics. (See Thinking, Fast and Slow)

      It's also interesting in light of this tweet which came up recently:

      I very much miss the back and forth with blog posts responding to blog posts, a slow moving argument where we had time to think.

      — Rachel Andrew (@rachelandrew) August 22, 2017
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      Because the Tweet was shared out of context several years later, someone (accidentally?) replied to it as if it were contemporaneous. When called out for not watching the date of the post, their reply was "you do slow web your way…" #

      This gets one thinking. Perhaps it would help more people's contextual thinking if more sites specifically labeled their posts as fast and slow (or gave a 1-10 rating?). Sometimes the length of a response is an indicator of the thought put into it, thought not always as there's also the oft-quoted aphorism: "If I Had More Time, I Would Have Written a Shorter Letter".

      The ease of use of the UI on Twitter seems to broadly make it a platform for "fast" posting which can often cause ruffled feathers, sour feelings, anger, and poor communication.

      What if there were posting UIs (or micropub clients) that would hold onto your responses for a few hours, days, or even a week and then remind you about them after that time had past to see if they were still worth posting? This is a feature based on Abraham Lincoln's idea of a "hot letter" or angry letter, which he advised people to write often, but never send.

      Where is the social media service for hot posts that save all your vituperation, but don't show them to anyone? Or which maybe posts them anonymously?

      The opposite of some of this are the partially baked or even fully thought out posts that one hears about anecdotally, but which the authors say they felt weren't finish and thus didn't publish them. Wouldn't it be better to hit publish on these than those nasty quick replies? How can we create UI for this?

      I saw a sitcom a few years ago where a girl admonished her friend (an oblivious boy) for liking really old Instagram posts of a girl he was interested in. She said that deep-liking old photos was an obvious and overt sign of flirting.

      If this is the case then there's obviously a social standard of sorts for this, so why not hold your tongue in the meanwhile, and come up with something more thought out to send your digital love to someone instead of providing a (knee-)jerk reaction?

      Of course now I can't help but think of the annotations I've been making in my copy of Lucretius' On the Nature of Things. Do you suppose that Lucretius knows I'm in love?

    1. This plugin adds two new views to Obsidian, the breadcrumb matrix/list view, and the breadcrumbs trail view. The wiki has more in-depth info on the plugin than the readme.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Eleanor Konik</span> in 2021-07-24: Showcases, Link Cards, & Better Tablet Toolbars (<time class='dt-published'>07/29/2021 12:14:15</time>)</cite></small>

  2. Jul 2021
    1. This is pretty slick and looks pretty in its published form. Great to see others are using clever set ups like this as posting interfaces.

      I have a feeling that other TiddlyWiki users would love this sort of thing. While TW may not seem as au courant, it's still got some awesome equivalent functionality and great UI which is what most of the users in the note taking space really care about.

      I do still wish that there was a micropub set up for Hypothes.is to make this sort of thing easier for the non-technical users.

    1. I like the hovercard-like UI that enables one to see prior versions of links on a page. It would be cool to have this sort of functionality built into preview cards for these as well.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Jonathan Zittrain</span> in The Rotting Internet Is a Collective Hallucination - The Atlantic (<time class='dt-published'>07/08/2021 22:07:17</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Suppose Google were to change what’s on that page, or reorganize its website anytime between when I’m writing this article and when you’re reading it, eliminating it entirely. Changing what’s there would be an example of content drift; eliminating it entirely is known as link rot.

      We don't talk about content drift very much. I like that some sites, particularly wiki sites, actually document their content drift in diffs and surface that information directly to the user. Why don't we do this for more websites? The Wayback machine also has this sort of feature.

  3. Jun 2021
    1. Persistent navigation drawers can toggle open or closed. The drawer sits on the same surface elevation as the content. It is closed by default and opens by selecting the menu icon, and stays open until closed by the user. The state of the drawer is remembered from action to action and session to session. When the drawer is outside of the page grid and opens, the drawer forces other content to change size and adapt to the smaller viewport.
    2. Temporary drawerTemporary navigation drawers can toggle open or closed. Closed by default, the drawer opens temporarily above all other content until a section is selected.
    1. These little trails of links help users figure out where they are within a website. Often located at the top of a site, breadcrumbs let users see their current location and the proceeding pages. Users are also able to click on them to move between steps.
    1. Reply to Nick Milo:

      Ward Cunningham may have been using a similar UI prior to it for other projects, but he unveiled the Smallest Federated Wiki at IndieWeb Camp 2011 in late June: https://indieweb.org/2011/Smallest_Federated_Wiki. I don't have a receipt to prove it, but I have to suspect that Andy's version was certainly influenced by Cunningham's work.

      Mike Caulfield, subsequent author of the influential The Garden and the Stream: a Technopastoral, Iterated on the Smallest Federated Wiki and created a WordPress-based plugin shortly thereafter called Wikity that used some of the card-based UI that Obsidian comes with out of the box.

      Both had some early influence on the UI-based research that the IndieWeb space has done since. For those interested, there's also a sub-group within it focusing on digital gardens, commonplace books, Zettelkasten, etc. that can be found here: https://indieweb.org/commonplace_book

  4. May 2021
    1. For dynamic routes, such as our src/routes/blog/[slug].svelte example, that's not enough. In order to render the blog post, we need to fetch the data for it, and we can't do that until we know what slug is. In the worst case, that could cause lag as the browser waits for the data to come back from the server. We can mitigate that by prefetching the data. Adding a sveltekit:prefetch attribute to a link... <a sveltekit:prefetch href="blog/what-is-sveltekit">What is SvelteKit?</a> ...will cause SvelteKit to run the page's load function as soon as the user hovers over the link (on a desktop) or touches it (on mobile), rather than waiting for the click event to trigger navigation. Typically, this buys us an extra couple of hundred milliseconds, which is the difference between a user interface that feels laggy, and one that feels snappy.
    1. This runs counter to the time-based structure of traditional blogs: posts presented in reverse chronological order based on publication date.

      Admittedly many blogs primarily operate on time-based order, but it would be fun if more digital gardens provided a most-recently updated feed of their content.

      This particular article is a case in point. I've read it before in an earlier stage and want to follow updates to it. I can subscribe to Maggie's feed, but currently her most recent post in my reader is dated 3 weeks ago. Without seeing a ping from another service to see the notification, I would have missed the significant update to this piece which has prompted me to re-read it for updates on the ideas contained in it.

      Some platforms like MediaWiki do provide feeds for recently updated. My colleague David Shanske has recently updated a WordPress plugin he built so that it provides WordPress sites with a feed for most recent updates, so that one would see not only new content, but also content which is added or updated from the past. As a result, here's his "updated feed" https://david.shanske.com/updated/feed/ which is cleverly useful.

    2. The conversational feed design of email inboxes, group chats, and InstaTwitBook is fleeting – they're only concerned with self-assertive immediate thoughts that rush by us in a few moments.

      The streamification of the web had already taken hold enough by this point. Anil Dash had an essay in 2012 entitled Stop Publishing Web Pages which underlined this point.

    1. This is rather slick. It would be interesting to parse the root URL and show more context of the original author's name, avatar, etc. as well.

    1. Charlotte Jee recently wrote a lovely fictional intro to a piece on a “feminist Internet” that crystallized something I can’t quite believe I never saw before; if girls, women and non-binary people really got to choose where they spent their time online, we would never choose to be corralled into the hostile, dangerous spaces that endanger us and make us feel so, so bad. It’s obvious when you think about it. The current platforms are perfectly designed for misogyny and drive literally countless women from public life, or dissuade them from entering it. Online abuse, doxing, blue-tick dogpiling, pro-stalking and rape-enabling ‘features’ (like Strava broadcasting runners’ names and routes, or Slack’s recent direct-messaging fiasco) only happen because we are herded into a quasi-public sphere where we don’t make the rules and have literally nowhere else to go.

      A strong list of toxic behaviors that are meant to keep people from having a voice in the online commons. We definitely need to design these features out of our social software.

    1. This is a rather cool find and I can think of a few ways of using it.

      Being able to add widgets easily to the dashboard can be a highly useful thing!

      Also having the ability to easily add an admin page in the menu could be incredibly helpful in this setting.

  5. Apr 2021
    1. Discord really did have the feel of a physical conference space, where everyone came together to chat, share and hang out, and the live Youtube comment facility that accompanied the presentations and keynotes really helped to encourage discussion.  My only small regret is that with so much of the engagement happening across multiple conference platforms, there was less activity on the hashtags on twitter, which makes it a little harder to look back over all the discussions that took place.

      Having multiple channels to check and watch both during and after a conference can certainly split up the conversation stream, make things difficult to follow and can create context collapse. It can also be overwhelming to have multiple different channels that one feels like they need to watch to stay on top of what is going on.

      It did help here to have the hashtag(s) for the conference piped into the Discord stream so that they could be watched in their own space without needing to leave the conference space created by the Discord server.

    1. What I like about some of the newer platforms (Ghost, Medium, Social Media platforms) is the way the default post and the menus themselves more clearly guide the user in their decisions about how to interact. There is a sense that the platform offers points of entry. Doesn’t hold the user’s hand – but welcomes them, points to stuff, and smiles at the user a bit more.

      Here's a great example of a person who wants some of the UI niceties provided by onboarding for new users. This can be incredibly important for people who are new to the platform.

      On the flip side, it's much easier to do for a social media platform like Twitter which only does one or two things. It can be far harder for platforms like WordPress which have a lot more complexity or uses and require personas or use-types to do this well.

    1. Introduction

      This is a fun and curious bit of UI here relating to Hypothes.is. There's an icon/button with a link to open the via interface and it auto updates with each additional annotation.

      I'd like to look into how they implemented it and potentially add it as a social sort of feature to my own site.

    1. ![Cosmic radiation](https://i.snap.as/T05UTpx.jpg)

      Since a lot of this is guaranteed to be seen as arcane magic, maybe this is an opportune place for the UI hooks for a conversational/palette-based UI? Maybe >> to set it off?

    1. Hammy wasn’t born in our fantasies, but in a Silicon Valley office.

      Per Yoni De Beule, UI (user interface) developer at Yelp: "Why a hamster? Why not a hamster!" . This quote gives some insight into how this design style is viewed internally (at least at the developer level) - it's not really a matter of deliberate infantilization or overtly sinister - although the end result - infantilization of the user (and all the broader cultural impacts this infantilization creates) is definitely not a neutral outcome.

      Source: Quora. “Why Does the Yelp Ios App Use Hamsters in Their Loading Animations and Error Screens?,” January 14, 2014. https://www.forbes.com/sites/quora/2014/01/14/why-does-the-yelp-ios-app-use-hamsters-in-their-loading-animations-and-error-screens/?sh=3253fefa462c.

    1. I LOVE the hover effects for the book covers on this site which is also a great example of someone collecting highlights/annotations of the books they read and hosting them in public on their personal website.

      Melanie has written about the CSS part of the hover effect here: https://melanie-richards.com/blog/highlights-minisite/ and like all awesome things, she's got the site open at https://github.com/melanierichards/highlights. I may have to do some serious digging for figuring out how she's creating the .svg images for the covers though.

    1. An example of this would be a button that looks clickable but isn’t, underlined text that doesn’t contain a link, or a TV remote that turns on your lights but not the TV. False affordances are often present by mistake or occur due to lack of effective design techniques.
    2. “when affordances are taken advantage of, the user knows what to do just by looking: no picture, label, or instruction needed.”
    1. So our blogrolls will automatically show writers you follow, sorted by who has most recently published. This approach makes blogrolls a living, breathing feature that reflects the activity in your network as it grows and changes.

      Blogrolls that update to show content by most recently updated could be an awesome addition to blogroll functionality in general.

    1. I asked Seyal if Pinterest had ever considered a feature that let users mark a life event complete. Canceled. Finished. Done. “We would have to have a system that thinks about things on an event level, so we could deliver on the promise,” Seyal said. “Right now we just use relevance as a measure.” But had Pinterest considered that, in the long run, people might be more inclined to use the app if it could become a clean space for them when they needed it to be, a corner of the internet uncluttered with grief?

      This would be a great feature for IndieWeb creators to consider.

    2. Pinterest doesn’t know when the wedding never happens, or when the baby isn’t born. It doesn’t know you no longer need the nursery. Pinterest doesn’t even know if the vacation you created a collage for has ended. It’s not interested in your temporal experience.This problem was one of the top five complaints of Pinterest users.
    1. It feels like neumorphic designers instantly forget everything they taught before, how they tested their designs for contrast, how they proved to customers, why they make the buttons on the sites as contrasting as possible.

      I really don’t think anyone who previously designed for accessibility would ‘forget’ for this trend. Dribbble designers by and large are not ‘working’ designers in real world scenerios.

    1. And some VR designs are literally spaces of floating panels.

      The laziest, but often most practical VR design

    1. Hérigone's only important work is the six volume Cursus mathematicus, nova, brevi, et clara methodo demonstratus Ⓣ<span class="non-italic">(</span>Course on mathematics : new, short, and with clear methods shown<span class="non-italic">)</span> or, to give it its French title, Cours mathematique, demonstre d'une nouvelle, briefve, et claire methode which appeared between 1634 and 1642.

      There is a clever little bit of UI on this page in which there appears a red letter T in a circle after the Latin title. If one clicks it ,there's a pop up of the translation of the title into English.

  6. Mar 2021
    1. A status emoji will appear in the top right corner of your browser. If it’s smiling, there are other people on the site right now too.

      This is pretty cool looking. I'll have to add it as an example to my list: Social Reading User Interface for Discovery.

      We definitely need more things like this on the web.

      It makes me wish the Reading.am indicator were there without needing to click on it.

      I wonder how this sort of activity might be built into social readers as well?

    2. If somebody else selects some text, it’ll be highlighted for you.

      Suddenly social annotation has taken an interesting twist. @Hypothes_is better watch out! ;)

    1. Yes — wariness over the way social networks and the publishing platforms they provide shift and shimmy beneath our feet, how the algorithms now show posts of X quality first, or then Y quality first, or how, for example, Instagram seems to randomly show you the first image of a multi-image sequence or, no wait, the second.

      The structure of these Instagram posts, which isn't always obvious to need to scroll sideways to see the other photos reminds me of some of the UI built into reveal.js as a slideshow feature or that found in Fold.

    2. Years ago, I helped build a storytelling platform called Hi (a simplification of its original name: Hitotoki, now shuttered and archived) and one of the things I’m most proud of our team having concocted is the commenting system. We had tens of thousands of users and almost no issues with harassment. You could comment on anyone’s story and your having commented would be public — a little avatar at the bottom of the page — but the comment itself would be private. This allowed folks to reap the public validation of engagement (“Whoa! So many comments!”) while simultaneously removing any grandstanding or attacks. It wasn’t quite messaging. It wasn’t quite commenting. It felt very much like a contemporary, lighter take on email, and in being so was a joy to use. Here’s what the bottom of an entry looks like: "Commenting" on Hitotoki

      I like the design and set up for this feature. Perhaps something for the IndieWeb to pick up? In some sense the implementation of Webmention-based likes, bookmarks, and facepiled mentions on my site is just this sort of design.

      The anecdotal evidence that there was little harassment is a positive sign for creating such a thing.

    1. I just wanted a way to send out my irregularly-updated newsletter to a couple thousand subscribers without getting caught in a spam filter.

      This is the short version of what Substack is and why people want to use it.

    1. Thrive Away. If a Thrive employee sends an e-mail to a colleague who is on vacation, the sender receives a note that the colleague is away and the message is automatically deleted. In theory, a simple vacation auto-responder should be sufficient—as it tells people sending a message not to expect a reply until the recipient returns—but logic is subservient in this situation. No matter what the expectations, the awareness that there are messages waiting somewhere triggers anxiety, ruining the potential relaxation of a person’s time off. The only cure is to prevent the messages from arriving altogether.

      A fascinating potential solution to the email problem. This is focused on the company space, but how might one decentralize this for use in all email scenarios?

    1. You don’t need to do any tricky cursor stuff, because it’s all semantically wired up already.
    2. I’d say if the form is short and an obvious pattern (like sign up or log in), you could use the placeholder visual pattern, but use real labels instead.
    3. If they click the area taken up by the label, it will activate the input. If they click the input, it will activate the input. Both correct.
    1. Everyone knows friction in software is harmful. But I think we all continually underestimate just how big an influence friction is on what people actually do and use. People don’t write long multi-tweet threads because it’s a good way to post a short essay, they do it because it’s so low friction.

      Friction within software can be a very good thing.

  7. Feb 2021
    1. Liked the post? Click the beard a few times.

      This is a clever and fun UI for implementing likes that seems on-brand for the website owner.

    1. The only problem is, I’ve seen a lot of “public Roams” but I never enjoy the reading experience. Non-linear “digital gardens” of notes are of immense usefulness, but only so long as the individual nodes provide quality linear reading experiences. And it’s not impossible to do so in Roam, but I’ve rarely seen it. 

      This is an important point and is generally true.

      But it's also why I like the idea of linking Roam or similar tools to Hypothes.is. Hypothes.is puts some of the conversation into other documents which are linear, but allow side conversations which could be moved into one's public/private notebooks.

      Similarly, longer articles within a digital garden could be this more linear space where conversations occur and continue to hone ideas.

    2. For instance, Notion has a sort of straightforward design that’s meant to be easy for anyone to use and learn. They prioritize making it obvious for newcomers, whereas Roam is more focused on power users who are willing to put quite a bit of effort into learning a new paradigm.

      Notice the difference in user interface and onboarding between [[Notion]] and [[Roam Research]].

    1. UX is now "user exploitation."

      The dark arts of dark patterns and exploiting cognitive biases.

    2. UX served, at best, to mitigate the visible harms of data-backed engineering running the show.

      This is a dark, but likely appropriate, view of UI within most larger companies.

    3. But what if leadership not only ignores our recommendations but tells us to do something different? I'll never forget one comment. "We're lying to our users," one anguished UX designer told me, explaining that leadership regularly ordered the UX team to create designs that were intentionally misleading. Apparently it helped boost profits.
  8. Jan 2021
    1. The past few years seems to have be a race between Microsoft and various players in the Linux world to see who can produce the worst abomination of a UI. It's as if there's been a ritualistic burning of the UI design rule book that led to many years of largely stable and consistent user experience across all platforms
    1. I really found this exercise very useful to get to know properly your team members, sometimes we feel frustrated because we don't feel comfortable working with some people, this definitely helps a lot.

    1. People don’t want to think too hard about your customer experience because thinking is hard work.

      As a user myself, I can totally relate to this article. I tend to stick to simple things in life, especially when it comes to technology. In the world that we live in, we don't have any time to actually sit and figure out an app or a website: we are constantly in a hurry and already have too many other things going on. We use so many apps and scroll down on so many websites per day, switching from one to another. So yes, I believe that when creating a user experience you have to take into consideration how simple it will be for the users.

  9. Dec 2020
  10. Nov 2020
    1. When writing copy for buttons, make sure that you keep consistency.
    2. I like to keep the ‘verb’ + ‘noun’ structure when writing button labels — this makes the action more prescriptive, e.g. ‘Save post’, ‘Next step’, etc, as opposed to ‘Save’, ‘Next’
    3. This means that there needs to be a ‘focus’ state for a button to show that it is ‘clickable, but not clicked yet’.
    4. Generally speaking, one will use smaller or less prominent buttons style for this.
    5. Secondary buttons are the ‘go back’ to the primary button’s ‘next’, or the ‘cancel’ button to the ‘submit’ button
    6. Primary buttons should be used in situations where the user may want to go ‘next’, ‘complete’, ‘start’, etc.
    7. I (and the rest of the internet) tend to use line buttons or text links as secondary buttons.
    1. After a few hours experimenting (updated NPM, NODE, ...) I found that renaming _smui-theme.scss to smui-theme.scss (without underscore prefix) solved the problem. I don't understand the mechanics behind (why in documentation is file with prefix).
    1. Frontend frameworks are a positive sum game! Svelte has no monopoly on the compiler paradigm either. Just like I think React is worth learning for the mental model it imparts, where UI is a (pure) function of state, I think the frontend framework-as-compiler paradigm is worth understanding. We're going to see a lot more of it because the tradeoffs are fantastic, to where it'll be a boring talking point before we know it.
  11. Oct 2020
    1. Introducing the notecard<picture><source type='image/webp' srcset="https://d33wubrfki0l68.cloudfront.net/1c9fc6f4219b130b82a6f7727ee74acecbe8b7a4/b4243/static/8ead8f249b03bd5814d09faec76a0d92/9e195/cardannotated.webp 200w, https://d33wubrfki0l68.cloudfront.net/f66b657967d2e34e758cb77fc59714a285319279/7a3d6/static/8ead8f249b03bd5814d09faec76a0d92/40a1d/cardannotated.webp 400w, https://d33wubrfki0l68.cloudfront.net/47d622ef46121005ad91293c7ee458a90d04b4fa/7fe2f/static/8ead8f249b03bd5814d09faec76a0d92/b0751/cardannotated.webp 800w, https://d33wubrfki0l68.cloudfront.net/6504d2ec44fb8a647fe5b79334af8ec4952253f7/8e755/static/8ead8f249b03bd5814d09faec76a0d92/a7c53/cardannotated.webp 1200w, https://d33wubrfki0l68.cloudfront.net/f69c4512b7a44c58464b2aef88aa47bf6a0bb66f/5c714/static/8ead8f249b03bd5814d09faec76a0d92/009c1/cardannotated.webp 1500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><source srcset="https://d33wubrfki0l68.cloudfront.net/d8560f7fcbf605ba3971dd25a26be6d61cc4cd0e/f1b18/static/8ead8f249b03bd5814d09faec76a0d92/4fa6c/cardannotated.jpg 200w, https://d33wubrfki0l68.cloudfront.net/eed5c3fa61adc2053cdbf49591157f1aaafcb163/00ee5/static/8ead8f249b03bd5814d09faec76a0d92/64b17/cardannotated.jpg 400w, https://d33wubrfki0l68.cloudfront.net/0a571025bfd13a5d0047fe36963562de5f20bd00/a556c/static/8ead8f249b03bd5814d09faec76a0d92/a1eb1/cardannotated.jpg 800w, https://d33wubrfki0l68.cloudfront.net/167359409657f272c354c8550a2c2e7f53ddd34a/27ba4/static/8ead8f249b03bd5814d09faec76a0d92/a6c62/cardannotated.jpg 1200w, https://d33wubrfki0l68.cloudfront.net/5250e9e013f951c51b8e0e5e41da294776ec9f35/e54ea/static/8ead8f249b03bd5814d09faec76a0d92/08276/cardannotated.jpg 1500w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><img loading="lazy" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" srcset="https://d33wubrfki0l68.cloudfront.net/d8560f7fcbf605ba3971dd25a26be6d61cc4cd0e/f1b18/static/8ead8f249b03bd5814d09faec76a0d92/4fa6c/cardannotated.jpg 200w, https://d33wubrfki0l68.cloudfront.net/eed5c3fa61adc2053cdbf49591157f1aaafcb163/00ee5/static/8ead8f249b03bd5814d09faec76a0d92/64b17/cardannotated.jpg 400w, https://d33wubrfki0l68.cloudfront.net/0a571025bfd13a5d0047fe36963562de5f20bd00/a556c/static/8ead8f249b03bd5814d09faec76a0d92/a1eb1/cardannotated.jpg 800w, https://d33wubrfki0l68.cloudfront.net/167359409657f272c354c8550a2c2e7f53ddd34a/27ba4/static/8ead8f249b03bd5814d09faec76a0d92/a6c62/cardannotated.jpg 1200w, https://d33wubrfki0l68.cloudfront.net/5250e9e013f951c51b8e0e5e41da294776ec9f35/e54ea/static/8ead8f249b03bd5814d09faec76a0d92/08276/cardannotated.jpg 1500w" src="https://d33wubrfki0l68.cloudfront.net/0a571025bfd13a5d0047fe36963562de5f20bd00/a556c/static/8ead8f249b03bd5814d09faec76a0d92/a1eb1/cardannotated.jpg" alt="Introducing the notecard" title="Introducing the notecard" style="position:absolute;top:0;left:0;opacity:1;width:100%;height:100%;object-fit:cover;object-position:center"/></picture>No more bloated files for taking notes. Create simple yet powerful digital note-cards with rich and varied content, like math equations, tables, images, checklists, and emojis.
    1. Svelte right now has a lot of opportunities to have component state become out of sync with props.
    2. I'm suggesting this is a problem generally. Users will not think of being out of sync with props
    3. Svelte doesn't re-render, so you need to respond to component mount/dismount and prop changes separately as they are distinct concepts and never tied together, unlike in React.
    1. The Instapaper highlights go to my Evernote inbox, then I copy them from Evernote into Roam (annoying, I know, hopefully the Roam API will be set up soon!) 

      Getting data into any of these note taking tools quickly always seems to be the most difficult part of the process.

    1. As I read this while thinking about the context of the IndieWeb and it's wiki, I'm thinking two cognitively dissonant thoughts: 1. The current technical uses are creating content more for themselves and their research and use and 2. They're not creating it to help out the users who may necessarily need a ladder or a bigger platform to get to where they are.

      It's going to take a layer of intermediate users, creators, or builders to help create a better path to bring the neophytes up to a higher level to get more out of the wealth of information that's hiding in it. Or it's going to take helpers and mentors to slowly build them up to that point.

      How can we more consistently reach a hand down to pull up those coming after us? How can we encourage others to do some of the same?

    1. Friction in UX can be a powerful tool, part of what I’m trying to find is where I want to retain friction as it helps me remain intentional.
    1. I think it is one of those topics with a lot of conjecture John. Apologies if there are too many links.

      Don't apologize for links. It's the web and links are important. In fact I might think that you could have a few additional links here! I would have seen it anyway, but I was a tad sad not to have seen a link to that massive pullquote/photo you made at the top of the post which would have sent me a webmention to boot. (Of course WordPress doesn't make it easy on this front either, so your best bet would have been an invisible <link> hidden in the text maybe?)

      I've been in the habit of person-tagging people in posts to actively send them webmentions, but I also have worried about the extra "visual clutter" and cognitive load of the traditional presentation of links as mentioned by John. As a result, I'm now considering adding some CSS to my site so that these webmention links simply look like regular text. This way the notifications will be triggered, but without adding the seeming "cruft" visually or cognitively. Win-win? Thanks for the inspiration!

      In your case here, you've kindly added enough context about what to expect about the included links that the reader can decide for themselves while still making your point. You should sleep easily on this point and continue linking to your heart's content.

    1. Although I’ve already got a blog (you’re reading it!), I decided not to mirror my book reviews here. I post normal content so infrequently that anyone who wanted to read the blog but wasn’t interested in book reviews would be inundated with content they didn’t want. In the end, I spun up an additional WordPress instance on my web space (something that my host, Krystal Hosting, makes very easy to do) to keep the reviews completely isolated from everything else.

      This seems to be a frequent excuse for people to spin up yet another website rather than attempting to tackle the UI subscription problem.

      Social readers would be well advised to think about this problem so people could have a single website with multiple types/kinds of content.

      Platforms should better delineate how to allow publishers and readers to more easily extract the posts that they're interested in following.

    1. What’s the difference between a digital garden, a note-taking app, and a blog? You can see the digital garden sitting between the former and the latter. It’s a place to share your evergreen notes—not raw notes you may have stored in your note-taking app, but not quite the level of polish you would expect on a blog. Creating a digital garden is a great way to receive early feedback on your ideas. Over time, several posts in your digital garden may be combined to create longer essays to post on your blog, but it won’t necessarily be the case.

      Anne-Laure defines a third "thing" known as a digital garden sitting in between a private note-taking/thinking tool and a blog. She calls it here a digital garden.

      The idea is interesting, but requires some additional work to create the third thing, which is okay for those who'd want it.

      In some sense, I'm more likely to create just a single thing that does all three functionalities and not worry too much about the public/private portions. I'm not opposed to maintaining all three, though it will require a tool that has the pre-built UI to make maintaining them all simple. Otherwise, I'm not sure the manual work would work for me.

    1. While I lament the loss of some of the artistry of the early web and lay much of the blame at the feet of blogging platforms like WordPress, such platforms also opened the web to far more people who would not have otherwise been able to create a website. Democratizing publishing is a far loftier goal than dropping animated GIFs across personal spaces.

      WordPress has done a lot to democratize publishing and make portions of it easier, but has it gone too far in crystalizing the form of things by not having more wiki-like or curation-based features?

    2. Throughout the platform’s history, end-users have remained at the mercy of their WordPress theme. Most themes are built around what WordPress allows out of the box. They follow a similar formula. Some may have a fancy homepage or other custom page templates. But, on the whole, themes have been primarily built around the idea of a blog. Such themes do not give the user true control over where to place things on their website. While some developers have attempted solutions to this, most have never met the towering goal of putting the power of HTML and CSS into the hands of users through a visual interface. This lack of tools has given rise to page builders and the block editor.

      an apropos criticsm

    1. I’m really not sure if linking, in general, has changed over the years. I’ve been doing it the same since day one. But that’s just me.

      Only in the last hour I've had a thought about a subtle change to one of the ways I link. It's not a drastic thing, but it is a subtle change to common practices. Also as I think about it, it removes some of the obviousness of links on social platforms like Twitter that add the ugly @ to a username in addition to other visual changes when one mentions someone else.

    1. Instagram, despite not having any official reshare option, allows near unlimited hashtag spamming, and that allows for more deterministic, self-generated distribution. Twitter also isn't as great for spreading visual memes because of its stubborn attachment to cropping photos to maintain a certain level of tweet density per phone screen.

      Some interesting UI clues here that either help or hamper social networks

    2. I think the Stories format is a genuine innovation on the social modesty problem of social networks. That is, all but the most egregious showoffs feel squeamish about publishing too much to their followers. Stories, by putting the onus on the viewer to pull that content, allows everyone to publish away guilt-free, without regard for the craft that regular posts demand in the ever escalating game that is life publishing. In a world where algorithmic feeds break up your sequence of posts, Stories also allow gifted creators to create sequential narratives.
    1. I find it somewhat interesting to note that with 246 public annotations on this page using Hypothes.is, that from what I can tell as of 4/2/2019 only one of them is a simple highlight. All the rest are highlights with an annotation or response of some sort.

      It makes me curious to know what the percentage distribution these two types have on the platform. Is it the case that in classroom settings, which many of these annotations appear to have been made, that much of the use of the platform dictates more annotations (versus simple highlights) due to the performative nature of the process?

      Is it possible that there are a significant number of highlights which are simply hidden because the platform automatically defaults these to private? Is the friction of making highlights so high that people don't bother?

      I know that Amazon will indicate heavily highlighted passages in e-books as a feature to draw attention to the interest relating to those passages. Perhaps it would be useful/nice if Hypothes.is would do something similar, but make the author of the highlights anonymous? (From a privacy perspective, this may not work well on articles with a small number of annotators as the presumption could be that the "private" highlights would most likely be directly attributed to those who also made public annotations.

      Perhaps the better solution is to default highlights to public and provide friction-free UI to make them private?

      A heavily highlighted section by a broad community can be a valuable thing, but surfacing it can be a difficult thing to do.

    1. The sidebar is styled white

      I do like how you've changed the styling a little bit. Being able to have the style fit the particular website is an interesting idea.

    1. Especially on mobile.

      I've found in the past that highlighting on Chrome for Android was nearly impossible. I've switched to using Firefox when I need to use hypothes.is on mobile.

    1. Art by O’Hare and Bell highlight - both visually and conceptually - the dialogic quality of annotation expressing power.

      While I'm reading this, I can't help but wishing that Hypothes.is would add a redaction functionality to their product. They could potentially effect it by using the highlighter functionality, but changing the CSS to have the color shown be the same as that of the (body) text instead of being yellow.

    1. Events
    2. While you could use a map function for loops they aren't optimized.
    3. Solid supports spread operator on native elements and Components.
    4. In general it is recommended you handle forms in this "controlled" manner. In some cases it might make sense to manage the form state outside of Solid via refs. These "uncontrolled" forms can also work. Just be conscious of the difference as mixing approaches can lead to unexpected results.
    1. Wait what? No runtime. How does that work? Well, obviously JavaScript executes at runtime, so was he saying he doesn't reuse any code? Well as it turns out the message here has changed. I looked and sure enough there was a runtime. Of course there was.
    2. Do we need another JS UI Library?
    1. The demand for top-notch app UI designers is so high that nowadays, companies hire UI designers explicitly separate from the development team. This way, they can be sure that the app gets the best designing resources.

      We often come across stunning apps; some catch our eyes for their color palette while some have unique transition effects, and so on. So, let’s find out what will be the most popular UI design trends of 2020.

  12. Sep 2020