13 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2019
    1. Plants and worn, aged materials are generally used by Japanese garden designers to suggest an ancient and faraway natural landscape, and to express the fragility of existence as well as time's unstoppable advance.

      Description of elements that compose and give atmosphere to the gardens.

    2. Japanese gardens (日本庭園, nihon teien) are traditional gardens[1] whose designs are accompanied by Japanese aesthetic and philosophical ideas, avoid artificial ornamentation, and highlight the natural landscape.

      Brief definition of a Japanese Garden.

  2. Apr 2018
    1. Since September 27, 2004, the jinmeiyō kanji (人名用漢字, kanji for use in personal names) consist of 3,119 characters, containing the jōyō kanji plus an additional 983 kanji found in people's names.

      人名用漢字(じんめいよう・かんじ)literally means "person's-name-use kanji" or "kanji for use in peoples' names."

      Kanji have been added and (re)moved from the list several times throughout its history. See the page Wikipedia: Jinmeiyoo Kanji

    2. The jōyō kanji (常用漢字, regular-use kanji) are 2,136 characters consisting of all the Kyōiku kanji, plus 1,130 additional kanji taught in junior high and high school[9].

      常用(じょうよう)漢字(かんじ)means "daily use" kanji.

    3. The grade-level breakdown of these kanji is known as the gakunen-betsu kanji haitōhyō (学年別漢字配当表), or the gakushū kanji. (ja:学年別漢字配当表)

      Also known as Kyōiku kanji (教育漢字, literally "education kanji"). see Wikipedia: Kyouiku Kanji

  3. Mar 2018
    1. Becauseでしょう indicates guess, it can be used for current events and past events that we are not certain.

      This is like the subjunctive in English and Spanish, but instead uses a form or the copula, です, instead of conjugating the verb into another form.

    1. ています can be used to mean an action (instantaneous or continuative) takes place on a regular basis.

      For example, "Every year, many people die," or "Every day, he goes to work."

    2. For English, telling the difference between instantaneous and continuative verbs is easy, because we seldom, if ever, use “be +ing” form for the former. For Japanese, however, the situation is complicated, as ていますcan be used with both kinds of verb.

      There is no way to tell the continuity of a verb by simply looking at it. One must understand the concept before knowing the full meaning when paired with ています.

    1. use ‘本を貸していただけませんでしょうか’ to make it even politer.

      book PRT-OBJ lend/give-TE_FORM it-is-acceptable-NEG COPULA-SUGGESTIVE PRT-INTERROGATIVE. "Is it not acceptable to give me your book?"

    2. ‘本を貸してくださいませんか’ (Can’t you lend me your book?)

      (your) book PRT-OBJ give-TE_FRM please-NEG (cannot) PRT-INTEROG (?). "Can't you give/lend me your book?"

      Using くださいません is the negative of ください which, when coupled with か makes a polite order in the form of a question: instead of "Please give me your book," it is "Can't you lend me your book?"

    3. when you ask the same people to do something FOR you, e.g. lend you a book or sign a recommendation letter for you, you can’t just use ください.

      This is like a homeless person saying "give me money, sir." It is still an order.

  4. Feb 2018
  5. Nov 2015
    1. まぶた)

      Testing a highlight on Ruby text.

      Highlight is meant to wrap this image: kanji

      Highlight is also meant to include the super-script hiragana characters: まぶた

      Actual highlight includes the hiragana characters "まぶた" as well as ")"