144 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2019
    1. Crystal Palace

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 228: "a Victorian exhibition center constructed (in 1854 by Sir John Paxton) of glass and iron. It was originally used to showcase materials from the Great Exhibition of 1851. The Palace, which burned in the 1930s, was in Sydenham in southeast London, about eight miles from the city center."

      GANGNES: The Crystal Palace was a massive glass structure constructed for the Great Exhibition of 1851. It stood in Hyde Park, London until it was moved to Sydenham Hill in 1852-4, where it remained until it was burned down in 1936. It During the Exhibition, it housed exhibits on cultures, animals, and technologies from all over the world.

      More information:

      "View from the Knightsbridge Road of The Crystal Palace in Hyde Park for Grand International Exhibition of 1851":

    2. Harrow Road

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 229: "a main thoroughfare of northwest London, north of Hammersmith and south of Willesden"

    3. South Kensington

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: "the sector of the west London borough of Kensington due south of Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park. It is the home of man of London's great museums."

    4. Exhibition Road

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 229: "a spacious thoroughfare in South Kensington, London. Location of the Imperial College of Science, formerly the Normal School of Science (part of the University of London), where Wells studied under Thomas Henry Huxley."

    5. the Serpentine

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: "an artificial lake in Kensington Gardens, used for boating"

    6. Baker Street

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 227: "an important thoroughfare in London's West End area. The (fictitious) home of Sherlock Holmes was at 221B Baker Street."

      GANGNES: The majority of the Sherlock Holmes stories, like The War of the Worlds, were serialized in a popular general-interest periodical--in this case, The Strand Magazine. Arthur Conan Doyle, who wrote the Holmes stories, was active around the same time as Wells, and they published in some of the same periodicals.

      More information:

    7. Marble Arch

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 231: "a triumphal stone arch (designed in 1828 by John Nash) in central London, at the northeast corner of Hyde Park"

    8. Zoological Gardens

      GANGNES: Now better known as the London Zoo. The Zoological Society of London established the Zoological Gardens in 1828. For excerpts from primary and secondary accounts, see Lee Jackson, "Victorian London - Entertainment and Recreation - Zoo's and Menageries - London Zoo / Zoological Gardens."

    9. Regent’s Canal

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 232: "one of London's key commercial waterways. It begins at the Commercial Docks, Limehouse (east London), runs north to Victoria Park, traverses much of north London, and then links up with the Paddington Canal, which belongs to a network of canals that extend as far north as Liverpool."

    10. St. Edmund’s Terrace

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: "a street in central London, between Regent's Park (on the south) and Primrose Hill (on the north)

    11. Albert Road

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 227: "a large thoroughfare north of Regent's Park in central London. Also known as Prince Albert Road."

    12. Albert Terrace

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 227: "a street linking Regent's Park Road and Albert Road, north of Regent's Park in central London"

    13. Langham Hotel

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: "a large, modern (in the 1890s) hotel on Portland Place, in central London, between Marylebone Road and Langham Place"

    14. Albert Hall

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 227: short for The Royal Albert Hall; "a huge enclosed amphitheater in the Italian Renaissance style in South Kensington, London. It was constructed in 1867-71, mainly as a concert hall and is still regularly used for that purpose."

    15. Imperial Institute

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: "on Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London. It was opened in 1893 as an exhibition center displaying raw materials and manufactured products that represented the commercial, industrial, and agricultural progress of the British Empire."

    16. Brompton Road

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 227: "a thoroughfare in South Kensington (West London), linking Fulham Road with Knightsbridge"

    17. St. Paul’s

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: "Sir Christopher Wren's great cathedral. In London, east of Ludgate Hill, one-eighth of a mile north of the Thames at Blackfriars."

      GANGNES: St. Paul's Cathedral is a massive cathedral that traces its origins to the year 604. It lies in the Blackfriars region of London, near the London Stock Exchange, and is tall enough that it would have been visible to the narrator in most parts of the city.

      More information:

      St. Paul's Cathedral in the late nineteenth century:

    18. Camden Town

      GANGNES: district in north London just southeast of Primrose Hill and northeast of Regent's Park, adjacent to the London Zoo.

    1. Roehampton

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: "a suburb of London, about five miles southwest of the city center"

    2. Fulham

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 229: "a district of West London, located just north of the Thames and south of Hammersmith, about four miles from the city center"

    3. Walham Green

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 234: "an area of Fulham, just north of the river Thames, about three miles southwest of central London"

    4. the City

      From MCCONNELL 283: "the area [of London] north of the Thames, from the Tower of London on the East to St. Paul's Cathedral on the west, enclosed within the original walls of London"

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 223 and 228: "On Sundays stores and businesses in the City of London are closed, and as the area is largely nonresidential, few people are to be seen." The City is "London's commercial and financial center, north of the Thames between the Temple (on the west) and Aldgate Pump (on the east). The Bank of England and the Royal Exchange are situated in The City."

      From DANAHAY 177: "the central part of London that contains many important financial and governmental buildings that would normally be closed on a Sunday"

    1. Waltham Abbey Powder Mills

      GANGNES: Waltham Abbey is ~15 miles north of the London city center. This is where the Royal Gunpowder Mills are located. Gunpowder production began there in the 1660s, and by the nineteenth century the mill was taking advantage of steam power to supply explosives to the British Navy and Army. The destruction of this site, then, is a huge blow to the British defense against the Martians; in trying to destroy one of the fighting machines, the British destroy a valuable supply of explosives for their military.

      More information:

    2. New River

      GANGNES: The New River is actually an aqueduct created in the 1600s, hence the fact that is a source of drinking water here. See "The New River" on the History of London website.

    3. Pool of London

      From MCCONNELL 225: "the artificially enlarged shipping area of the Thames"

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 232: "Strictly speaking this refers to the stretch of the river Thames between London Bridge (on the west) and Cuckold's Point (on the east), near West India Dock. But more popularly it has come to signify the area of London below (i.e., east of) London Bridge. Fairly large sea-going vessels have access to the port of London up to this part of the Thames."

    4. Blackfriars Bridge. At that the Pool became a scene of mad confusion, fighting and collision, and for some time a multitude of boats and barges jammed in the northern arch of the Tower Bridge

      GANGNES: Blackfriars Bridge and Tower Bridge are two large bridges spanning the Thames from north to south in the eastern part of London. Today, the Millennium Bridge (a pedestrian bridge) and Southwark Bridge lie between them, but Southwark Bridge wasn't opened until 1921, and the Millennium Bridge 2000 (hence the name). These are four of the five Thames bridges overseen today by the London City Corporation. See the City of London site's page on bridges.

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 227: Blackfriars Bridge is "a bridge in central London between Waterloo Bridge and Southwark Bridge. It spans the Thames from Queen Victoria Street (on the north)to Southwark Street (on the south).

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 234: Tower Bridge is "London's most famous bridge. It opens periodically to admit the passage of shipping. It spans the Thames between the Tower of London (on the north) and the district of Bermondsey (on the south)."

    5. Limehouse

      GANGNES: area of London east of Southwark Bridge and Tower Bridge (and the Tower of London), on the north bank of the Thames

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: "a tough, working-class district in London's East End. It is north of Commercial Road and East India Dock Road, about five miles east of Charing Cross."

    6. Colchester

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 228: "a town in northeast Sussex, on the river Colne, about seventy miles northeast of central London."

      GANGNES: Colchester is near the east coast of England, ~25 miles northeast of Chelmsford.

    7. Highgate and even it was said at Neasden

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: Highgate is "a district of north London, on a hill below Hampstead Heath. One of the most picturesque parts of London, it was (in the 1890s) and still is an area of many fine houses."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 231: Neasden is "a northwest suburb of greater London, about six miles from the city center. It is now heavily residential but it was quite rural in the 1890s."

      GANGNES: Highgate is to the north and slightly east of Chalk Farm; Neasden is to the northwest of Chalk Farm.

    8. used in automatic mines across the Midland counties

      From MCCONNELL 226: "'Automatic mines' are mines set to detonate on contact with any moving object; they are so called to distinguish them from mines exploded by electric current from shore. ... The mines are set to block the expected advance of the Martians into the counties (Leicester, Warwick, Nottinghamshire, etc.) in the middle of England."

    9. Midland Railway Company

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 215: "The Midland Railway Company provided public transportation to such Midlands cities as Nottingham, Leicester, Manchester, and Leeds. Its London terminus was St. Pancras Station."

    10. Chipping Ongar

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 228: "a small town in west Essex about sixteen miles north-northeast of London"

      GANGNES: Chipping Ongar is to the east and slightly north of Edgware, ~2/3 of the way from Edgware to Chelmsford (relevant to the narrator's brother's journey).

    11. Primrose Hill

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 232: "an eminence north of Regent's Park, with the London Zoo below. It commands an extensive view of London."

      GANGNES: Primrose Hill is just south of Chalk Farm.

    12. Tillingham

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 234: "a small town in Essex, about four miles west of the North Sea and sixty-five miles northeast of central London."

      GANGNES: Tillingham is north of Foulness and northeast of Southend.

    13. Harwich, and Walton, and Clacton, and afterwards to Foulness and Shoebury

      GANGNES: villages on the eastern coast of England; the sailors are traveling from north to south along the coast

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 228: Clacton (officially Clacton-on-Sea) is "a resort town on the North Sea, about eighty miles northeast of London."

    14. the Naze

      From MCCONNELL 227: "a promontory, north of London (in the county of Essex), extending into the North Sea"

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: "a promontory on the North Sea coast of Essex, about four miles south of the seaport of Harwich."

    15. Southampton

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: "a major seaport in south Hampshire, about seventy miles southwest of London"

    16. Hamburg

      GANGNES: port city in Germany

    17. Blackwater

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 227: "a river about forty miles long in the south of England. It flows from Saffron Walden to Mersea Island, where it enters the North Sea."

      GANGNES: wide river flowing in from the east coast of England, north of Foulness and Southend; Maldon (below) lies at the western point where it narrows

    18. Ostend

      From MCCONNELL 228: seaport in NW Belgium

    19. the Crouch

      From MCCONNELL 229: "The River Crouch, south of the Naze, meets the North Sea at Foulness Point."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 228: "a river in Essex about twenty-four miles long. It flows from Brentwood to Foulness point, where it enters the North Sea."

    20. Barnes

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 227: "a district of greater London south of the Thames, between Putney (on the east) and Mortlake (on the west), and about six miles west-southwest of central London"

    21. Sheen

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: "a district of greater London south of the Thames, between Richmond (on the west) and Roehampton (on the east), about eight miles west of central London"

      GANGNES: east of Twickenham, north of Richmond, west of Barnes, and south of Chiswick; essentially the same area as Mortlake

    22. The fifth cylinder, the fifth shot from Mars

      GANGNES: See notes below from MCCONNELL and HUGHES AND GEDULD about a possible inconsistency or oversight in the order of the cylinder landings. This makes mapping them even more complicated.

    23. Fifth Cylinder

      GANGNES: MCCONNELL 240 identifies this as a "contradiction. The fourth start had fallen late Sunday night, north of where the narrator and the curate are hiding..., and the narrator only hears of it later, from his brother. So it is impossible for him to know, at the time, that this i the fifth star; he should think it is the fourth." A case could be made, however, that the narrator is writing this in retrospect, and therefore could be imposing his later knowledge of which cylinder it is onto his impressions at the time.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD further complicate the matter by responding to MCCONNELL: "But the first three cylinders fell one after the other late on the nights of Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. Doubtless the narrator simply assumes that the fourth fell 'late Sunday night' and that this one (late Monday night) is the fifth. ... The real trouble is that--far from being unaware of the fourth cylinder--the narrator should be only too well acquainted with it. It fell the previous night, into Bushey Park, which he and the curate have just traversed. But Wells has forgetfully caused the park to contain nothing more remarkable than 'the deer going to and fro under the chestnuts.'"

    1. Hampton

      GANGNES: village on the north bank of the Thames, slightly northwest of Ditton between Walton and Kingston

    2. Bushey Park

      From DANAHAY 113: large park; part of Greater London

      GANGNES: now spelled "Bushy Park"; in Hampton

    3. Lambeth

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: "a metropolitan borough of London, on the south bank of the Thames. Waterloo Station, key exit point for southwest England, is located in this borough."

    4. Chipping Barnet

      GANGNES: a village about 12 miles to the north of central London; Londoners are fleeing north from the Martians

    5. Chalk Farm

      GANGNES: area of London on the north side of the Thames; north of the British Museum and on the way north to Haverstock Hill, where the narrator's brother goes next

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 228: In the 1890s [Chalk Farm Station] was a busy station on the London and North-Western Railway (terminus Euston), at the junction of Adelaide Road and Haverstock Hill, immediately north of Primrose Hill in central London."

    6. Haverstock Hill

      GANGNES: the northbound road through Chalk Farm

    7. Belsize Road

      GANGNES: road to the west from Chalk Farm; the narrator's brother decides to travel west instead of north because the Haverstock Hill road is blocked

    8. Edgware

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 229: "a suburban area of greater London, in Middlesex, about seven miles northwest of the city center."

      GANGNES: north of Chalk Farm (on the narrator's brother's path)

    9. Saint Albans

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: "a town in south-central Hertford, about twenty miles north-northwest of central London"

      GANGNES: about 11-12 miles north of Edgware (relevant to narrator's brother's journey)

    10. Chelmsford

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 228: "a small town in central Essex, about twenty-five miles east-northeast of London"

      GANGNES: about 38 miles east of Edgware (on narrator's brother's journey)

  2. Apr 2019
    1. Stanmore

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: "a small town in Middlesex, about nine miles northwest of the city center. It is now part of greater London but was a rural area in the 1890s."

      GANGNES: about 3 miles west of Edgware

    2. Pinner

      GANGNES: village about 3.5 miles west of Stanmore

    3. New Barnet

      GANGNES: village about 5 miles northeast of Edgware

    4. Essex towards Harwich

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 229: Essex is "a county of southeast England bordered by Cambridge and Suffolk (on the north), the river Thames (on the south), London (on the southwest), and the North Sea, Middlesex, and Hertford (on the east)."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: Harwich is "a North Sea port in northeast Essex, at the confluence of the rivers Stout and Orwell, about seventy miles northeast of London."

      GANGNES: Essex is 32-33 miles east of New Barnet; essentially same area as Chelmsford (where the narrator's brother's friends live).

    5. North Road

      GANGNES: a road that runs directly north from Barnet Road, leading out of Barnet and far to the north

    6. Waltham Abbey

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 234: "a small town on the river Lea, in southwest Essex, bordering Epping Forest. In the 1890s there was an old gunpowder factory in the area."

      GANGNES: about 15 miles to the east and slightly north of Edgware

    7. Southend and Shoeburyness

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: "Fully named Southend-on-Sea. A resort town in southeast Essex at the mouth of the Thames, thirty-three miles east of central London."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: "Shoebury or Shoeburyness [is] a coastal town at the mouth of the Thames, just east of Southend and thirty-eight miles east of London."

      GANGNES: Southend is about 45 miles directly east of Edgware; Shoeburyness is just slightly east of that along the coast.

    8. Deal and Broadstairs

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 228: Deal is "a resort town in Eastern Kent, about seven miles from Dover and sixty-eight miles east-southeast of central London."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 227: Broadstairs is "a coastal town in northeast Kent, on the English Channel, about seventy miles east-southeast of central London."

      GANGNES: Deal is slightly south of Broadstairs.

    1. Virginia Water or Guildford. They were busy making the necessary arrangements to alter the route of the Southampton and Portsmouth

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 234: Virginia Water is "a small town in northwest Surrey, eighteen miles west-southwest of central London. It is the site of an artificial lake from which the town takes its name."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 229: Guildford is "a town in west-central Surrey, on the river Wey, about twenty-five miles southwest of central London."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 223: Southampton is "a major seaport in south Hampshire, about seventy miles southwest of London."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 232: Portsmouth is "a town and major naval base on Portsea Island, southeast Hampshire, sixty-three miles southwest of central London."

    2. Putney

      GANGNES: village/area on the south bank of the Thames on the way from Woking toward central London; about three-quarters of the way there

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 232: "a district of London located immediately south of the Thames, about seven miles west of the city center"

    3. Molesey

      GANGNES: village on the south bank of the Thames on the way from Woking to central London, beyond Weybridge and Walton but not quite as far as Kingston

    4. Woolwich and Chatham

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 235: Woolwich is "a suburb of greater London, on the south bank of the Thames, about ten miles from central London. It is the site of the Royal Arsenal, Royal Military Academy, and Royal Artillery Barracks."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 228: Chatham is "a town in north Kent and the site of an important naval base. It is on the river Medway, about thirty miles east-southeast of London."

    5. Clock Tower and the Houses of Parliament

      GANGNES: The Houses of Parliament are on the north bank of the Thames in Westminster, between Westminster Abbey and Westminster Bridge. The "Clock Tower" here is commonly referred to today as "Big Ben."

    6. Fleet Street

      GANGNES: Fleet Street is a central London road on the north side of the Thames; it becomes (the) Strand (see below) to the west. During the Victorian period it was the home of most major London periodical publishers. It is associated with the story of Sweeney Todd: the "Demon Barber of Fleet Street," who appeared in the Victorian "penny dreadful" The String of Pearls: A Romance (1846-7).

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 229: Fleet Street is "a famous central London thoroughfare linking Ludgate Circus and The Strand. Until 1988 it was the home of many of London's most important newspapers. During Wells's lifetime 'Fleet Street' was a term synonymous with the British press."

      More information:

    7. Barnes, Wimbledon, Richmond Park, Kew

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 227: Barnes is "a district of greater London south of the Thames, between Putney (on the east) and Mortlake (on the west), and about six miles west-southwest of central London."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 235: Wimbledon is "a district of greater London, in north Surrey, about eight miles southwest of central London. Famous as the home of the All England Lawn Tennis Club--where international tennis tournaments are held annually. The sixth cylinder lands here."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: Richmond Park is "a large recreation area in Richmond."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: Kew is a "residential district in Richmond, northeast Surrey, on the Thames, about eight miles west of central London. It is the site of Kew Gardens (the Royal Botanical Gardens), with its famous Pagoda."

    8. the Strand

      GANGNES: The Strand (technically just "Strand") is a road just south of Trafalgar Square (see below) and north of the Thames; it runs along to the east and then becomes Fleet Street (see above). The Strand Magazine, which published the Sherlock Holmes stories, took its name from the fact that its first publishing house was located on Southampton Street, intersecting with Strand.

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 234: The Strand is "an important thoroughfare in central Lundon. It runs parallel with the Thames (a very short distance away) and extends west from the Aldwych to Trafalgar Square. It is the location of fashionable stores, hotels, theatres, and office buildings."

    9. Trafalgar Square

      GANGNES: A famous square/plaza in central London, situated just to the south of the National Gallery. It features an iconic tower surrounded by four large lions. See the City of London's official page on the Square.

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 234: "Central London's most famous concourse, dedicated to England's naval hero, Lord Nelson (and his victory at Trafalgar in 1805). In the center of the square there is a granite column, 145 feet tall, crowned with a statue of Nelson."

    10. Sutton High Street on a Derby Day

      GANGNES: The 1898 edition changes "Sutton" to "Epsom."

      From MCCONNELL 198: "The town of Epsom, south of London, is the annual site of the Derby."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 213: "teeming with people"; see Frith's painting "Derby Day" (1856-58) (below)

    11. Westminster to his apartments near Regent’s Park

      GANGNES: Regent's Park is a large public park in the northern part of central London. It lies north of the Thames, and it would likely take the narrator's brother a little under an hour to walk there from the south, depending on where in Westminster he is and where his apartment is situated. Wells's final home was near Regent's Park.

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 232: Regent's Park is "central London's largest park, containing the London Zoo and the Botanical Gardens. It extends north from Marylebone Road to Primrose Hill; and west from Albany to Grand Union Canal."

    12. Albany Street barracks

      From STOVER 141: "Army barracks in central London. In the event, soldiers quartered there are useless in facing unconventional Martian forces."

    13. Oxford Street

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 232: "a major shopping thoroughfare in central London, northeast of Hyde Park. It extends east from Marble Arch to Tottenham Court Road."

    14. Marylebone Road

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 231: "a busy central-London thoroughfare, south of Regent's Park, between Lisosn Grove (on the west) and Baker Street (on the east)."

    15. part of Marylebone, and in the Westbourne Park district and St. Pancras, and westward and northward in Kilburn and St. John’s Wood and Hampstead, and eastward in Shoreditch and Highbury and Haggerston and Hoxton, and indeed through all the vastness of London from Ealing to East Ham

      GANGNES: As is evident by this point, the entirety of The War of the Worlds is specifically situated in actual locations in and around London. This rapid-fire naming of specific streets and neighborhoods can be overwhelming to readers who are not familiar with London, but to those who are (as many of Wells's readers would be), they underscore that this crisis is happening in a very real location. It also gives the narrative a breathless sense of momentum while maintaining the specificity of war reporting.

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 235: Westbourne Park is "a district in the London borough of Kensington, about two and a half miles from the city center."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: St. Pancras is "a London borough north of the Thames, two miles form the city center. It is the site of Euston and St. Pancras [train] stations, main transit points for northern England and Scotland."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: Kilburn is "a northwest London district between Hampstead (on the north) and Paddington (on the south), about three and a half miles northwest of central London."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: St. John's Wood is "a middle-to-upper-class residential district northwest of Regent's Park, in north London."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 229: Hampstead is "a hilly northeast London suburb, about five miles from the city center. From its highest point, on Hampstead Heath, it offers a magnificent vista of London."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: Shoreditch is "a working-class district in east London, about a mile from the city center."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 229: Haggerston is "a tough, working-class district in North London, north of Bethnal Green and east of Shoreditch."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: Hoxton is "a tough, working-class district in north London, between Shoreditch and Haggerston, about two miles northeast of Charing Cross in central London."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 229: Ealing is "a London borough in the county of Middlesex, some eight miles west of the city center."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 229: East Ham is a "London district int eh county of Essex, about seven miles east of the city center."

    16. Staines

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: "a town in Middlesex, at the junction of the rivers Colne and Thames, eighteen miles west-southwest of central London."

    17. at Staines, Hounslow, Ditton, Esher, Ockham

      GANGNES: These villages are all to the north or east of Woking and would be suitably arranged to face the crescent of Martian fighting machines.

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: Hounslow is "a suburban area of Middlesex, about ten miles west of central London."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 231: Ockham is "a village in Surrey, about two and a half miles southeast of Woking and five miles northwest of Guildford."

    18. Ripley

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: "a village in Surrey adjoining Send, two and a half miles southeast of Woking and five miles north-northeast of Guildford."

    19. Saint George’s Hill

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: "located about five miles north-northeast of Woking Station."

    20. Ditton and Esher

      GANGNES: villages to the northeast of Woking on the south bank of the Thames, roughly between Walton and Kingston

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 228: Ditton is "a small town in central Kent, about four miles northwest of Maidstone."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 229: Esher is "a small town in northeast Surrey, fifteen miles southwest of London."

    1. I would make a big detour by Epsom to reach Leatherhead

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 209: The narrator "intends to make a northerly bypass of Leatherhead then circle back to it from the east."

    2. the Shepperton side

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 210: north bank of the Thames

    3. the tower of Shepperton church—it has been replaced by a spire

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 210: This is the Church of St. Nicholas; it is later smashed by the Martians.

    4. towards Chertsey

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 110: Chertsey is ~1 mile northwest of Weybridge.

    5. Surrey side

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 210: southern side of the Thames

    6. towards Laleham

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 110: Laleham is ~2 miles north of Weybridge.

    7. Kingston and Richmond

      GANGNES: towns/villages on the banks of the Thames, past Halliford toward central London; Richmond farther away from Halliford than Kingston

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: "Usually called Kingston-on-Thames. A municipal borough in northeast Surrey, about nine miles southwest of central London."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: "a borough of greater London, on the Thames in North Surrey, about eight miles west-southwest of central London"

    8. Middlesex bank

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 211: north shore of the Thames

    9. Halliford

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD: Upper Halliford is "a district southwest of greater London, between Sunbury and Shepperton, thirteen miles west-southwest of the city center."

    10. Walton

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 234: "Walton (on the Naze) [is] a town on the North Sea, about seventy-five miles northeast of London."

    11. Sunbury

      GANGNES: North and slightly to the east of Upper Halliford, where the narrator and curate are at this point. Roughly a half-hour walk or less, depending on where in Upper Halliford and where in Sunbury-on-Thames.

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 234: "a town in Middlesex, known fully as Sunbury-on-Thames, thirteen miles west-southwest of London"

    1. Addlestone

      GANGNES: village to the north and slightly east of Woking

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 227: "a village in Surrey, about four miles north of Woking"

    2. Leatherhead

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: "A town in central Surrey, about twelve miles due east of Woking. It is sixteen miles southwest of central London, on the river Mole."

    3. Maybury Hill

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 231: "a street that extends south, at almost a right angle, from the northeast end of Maybury Road"

    4. down the opposite slope of Maybury Hill towards Old Woking

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 207: heading due south

    5. Leatherhead is about twelve miles from Maybury Hill.

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 207: to the east

    6. Pyrford

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 232: "a village in Surrey, about three-quarters of a mile east of Woking"

    7. I came through Ockham (for that was the way I returned, and not through Send and Old Woking)

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD: The narrator "went to Leatherhead by a southerly route, through Send, but returns by a northerly route."

    8. the Orphanage, near the crest of the hill

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 208: some readers have mistaken this for the Orphanage that used to be in Oriental Road

      From STOVER 103: "The orphanage on the crest of Maybury Hill was not built until 1909; in its place at the time there stood St. Peter's Memorial Home for the aged."

    9. Street Chobham

      GANGNES: This should be Cobham, which was confused with Chobham--a village to the northwest of Woking mentioned several times in the novel. Cobham is five miles to the east and slightly north of Woking on the way from Woking (via Byfleet) to Leatherhead. It seems that either Wells or the editors of Pearson's mistakenly wrote "Street Chobham" instead of "Street Cobham"; the error is corrected in the 1898 version.

    10. the potteries

      From MCCONNELL 168: "A district in central England, also called the 'Five Towns,' famous for its pottery and china factories. The area was a favorite subject of Wells's friend, the novelist Arnold Bennett (1867-1931).

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 208: The "five towns" MCCONNELL refers to are Stoke-on-Trent, Hanley, Burslem, Tunstall, and Longton. In 1888 Wells spent three months in the Potteries region.

      From DANAHAY 80: "an area of central England with a large number of china factories and their furnaces"

    1. Inkerman barracks

      From MCCONNELL 154: "The Inkerman Barracks were named for the Battle of Inkerman, where in 1854, English and French troops defeated an attacking Prussian Army. Throughout the late nineteenth century, the armies of Europe were in the process of massive and ominous expansion and reorganization. But the British had a long-standing aversion to the idea of a standing army. Their reorganization, beginning in 1870, emphasized the localization of garrisons and short enlistment terms for civilian volunteers. In 1881 the infantry of the line was remodeled into two-battalion regiments with territorial names."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 206: located ~2.5 miles southwest of the Horsell sand pits; ~2 miles west of Woking Station

    2. from the direction of Horsell

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 204: from the southwest

    3. towards Chertsey

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 204: to the north

    4. Knap Hill

      GANGNES: Changed to "Knaphill" in the 1898 edition and subsequent versions.

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 204 and 230: Knaphill is ~3 miles due west form Horsell Common. The distances might seem exaggerated to today's readers, but they are presented from a pedestrian's perspective.

    5. the road from Woking Station

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 204: "The Chertsey and the Chobham roads start at Woking station, then divide. The 'Something' that 'fell with a crash far away to the left' fell presumably to the west. So the road referred to here is presumably the Chobham Road."

    6. the common from Horsell to Maybury

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 204: distance of ~1 mile

    7. Maybury arch

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 231: "a railroad bridge about three-quarters of a mile northeast of Woking Station"

    8. Aldershot

      GANGNES: town to the southwest of Woking

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 227: "Since 1855 an important garrison town in Hampshire, thirty miles southwest of London and about ten miles west of Woking, Surrey.

    9. Byfleet Golf Links

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 228: "Located about three-quarters of a mile of central Woking. Now known as West Byfleet Golf Course."

    1. Maybury

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 231: "Eastern sector of the town of Woking, Surrey. The location of the narrator's house and also of Wells's home at the time of the writing of [The War of the Worlds]."

    2. Chertsey

      GANGNES: town to the north of Woking, farther than Ottershaw

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 228: "A small town about three miles north of Woking, Surrey."

    3. Ottershaw

      GANGNES: village to the north of Woking but south of Chertsey

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 232: "A small village about two miles north-northwest of Woking, Surrey, and about three miles form the narrator's home in Maybury. It is the location of Ogilvy's observatory."

    4. Isleworth

      GANGNES: to the northeast of Woking, a little over halfway between Woking and central London

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: "Residential district of greater London, just east of Kew Gardens, about eight miles west-southwest of the center of the city."

    5. Winchester

      GANGNES: city near the south coast of England; Woking lies to the northeast midway between Winchester and London

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 235: "A city in southern England, in Hampshire, about sixty miles southwest of London. Famous for its Cathedral (founded 1079) and its public school (Britain's oldest)."

    6. Woking

      GANGNES: the town in which the first Martian cylinder lands and the first part of the narrative action takes place; the narrator lives in the area

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 235: "A town in Surrey, about four miles north of Guildford and twenty-three miles southwest of central London."

    7. Horsell

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: "Northern sector of Woking, Surrey."

    8. Berkshire, Surrey, and Middlesex

      From DANAHAY 47: contiguous English counties

      GANGNES: Most of the novel takes place in Surrey and central London.

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 227: Berkshire is "a county of southern England bordered by Oxford and Buckingham (on the north), Gloucester (on the northwest), Hampshire (on the south), Surrey (on the southeast), and Wiltshire (on the west)."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 234: Surrey is "a county of southern England bordered by Buckingham, Middlesex, and London (on the north), Berkshire (on the northwest), Kent (on the east), Hampshire (on the west), and Sussex (on the southwest). It is drained by the rivers Thames, Wey, and Mole."

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 231: Middlesex is "a major residential district that forms a sizeable part of London's metropolitan area. It borders Essex and London (on the east), Surrey (on the south), Hertford (on the north), and Buckingham (on the west)."

    9. sand-pits

      From STOVER 67: The sand-pits are a real topographical feature on Horsell Common.

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 233: "On the east side of Horsell Common, about a mile and a half north of Woking."

    10. Weybridge

      GANGNES: a town to the northeast of Woking, between Woking and London

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 235: "a north Surrey town about four miles northeast of Woking and seventeen miles southwest of central London"

    11. Horsell Bridge

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: "a canal bridge near the center of Woking"

    12. Horsell Common

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 230: "recreational area immediately north of Woking, Surrey, where the first cylinder landed"

    13. Chobham

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 228: "A village about three and a half miles northwest of Woking, Surrey. To the southeast it borders on Horsell Common, where the first cylinder landed."

    14. Chobham Road

      GANGNES: road leading to Chobham from Woking

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 228: "a thoroughfare bordering the north side of Horsell Common, located about a mile and a half north of Woking, Surrey"

    15. Waterloo

      From HUGHES AND GEDULD 234: "Waterloo (railroad) Station, in Waterloo Road, Lambeth. In the 1890s this station was the terminus of the South-Western Railway, which served points in southern England."

    16. road from Chobham or Woking

      GANGNES: southeast of Chobham or north from Woking

    1. Google says that will prevent the company from remembering where you’ve been. Google’s support page on the subject states: “You can turn off Location History at any time. With Location History off, the places you go are no longer stored.” That isn’t true. Even with Location History paused, some Google apps automatically store time-stamped location data without asking. (It’s possible, although laborious, to delete it .)
  3. Aug 2018
    1. Google also says location records stored in My Activity are used to target ads. Ad buyers can target ads to specific locations — say, a mile radius around a particular landmark — and typically have to pay more to reach this narrower audience. While disabling “Web & App Activity” will stop Google from storing location markers, it also prevents Google from storing information generated by searches and other activity. That can limit the effectiveness of the Google Assistant, the company’s digital concierge. Sean O’Brien, a Yale Privacy Lab researcher with whom the AP shared its findings, said it is “disingenuous” for Google to continuously record these locations even when users disable Location History. “To me, it’s something people should know,” he said.
    2. Google says that will prevent the company from remembering where you’ve been. Google’s support page on the subject states: “You can turn off Location History at any time. With Location History off, the places you go are no longer stored.” That isn’t true. Even with Location History paused, some Google apps automatically store time-stamped location data without asking. (It’s possible, although laborious, to delete it .)
  4. Jul 2018
  5. course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com
    1. even the comforting effect of ROBINSON CRUSOE

      I would be interested in running a word co-location algorithm to analyze the adjectives and nouns used by the narrator when the invoking Robinson Crusoe. It would also be interesting to run a similar algorithm regarding the narrator's description of himself and his actions and examine the relationship between the sets of words.

  6. Mar 2018
    1. Il existe plusieurs manières d'exploiter son fonds de commerce : d'une part il est possible pour le propriétaire du fonds de l'exploiter personnellement et d'autre part, le titulaire du fonds peut en confier l'exploitation à une tierce personne, laquelle va exploiter le fonds de commerce à ses risques et périls. C'est cette seconde hypothèse qui constitue la location-gérance.

      Il existe plusieurs formes de location-gérance : gérance salariée, gérance mandat, gérance libre. Tour d'abord, la gérance salariée aux termes de laquelle le propriétaire gardera une emprise sur la gestion du fonds de commerce, le salarié ne fera qu'exécuter les consignes données par le propriétaire du fonds.

    1. Pourquoi mettre fin à une Location-Gérance ? Le contrat de location-gérance permet au titulaire d'un fonds de commerce d'en confier l'exploitation à une tierce personne, laquelle va exploiter le fonds à ses risques et périls. La cessation de ce contrat peut trouver sa source dans diverses causes de rupture, lesquelles emportent des conséquences importantes pour les parties au contrat.

      Pourquoi et comment mettre un terme et rompre un contrat de location-gérance d'un fonds de commerce ?

  7. Feb 2018
  8. Nov 2017
  9. Oct 2017
    1. Three places were proposed, to wit Lexington in the County of Rockbridge, Staunton in the County of Augusta, and the Central college in the County of Albemarle: each of these was unexceptionable as to healthiness & fertility. It was the degree of centrality to the white population of the state which alone then constituted the important point of comparison between these places

      Originally learning about UVA’s more racist history, I was sadly surprised, but it made since, America’s past and being in the South. It’s always just the details that made it more gruesomely real- the fact that the centrality of whiteness was a key factor in deciding location. I looked on Google Maps of the other two location the founders were deciding on to see if perhaps they were more North, and that’s why they weren’t “white enough”. Instead, I saw they were more West and behind the mountainous Appalachian regions. I wonder what made those regions less white. Were there more indigenous people or was it more slaves in plantations? Or was there, in fact, a distinction between the more city and educated white folk versus the country white farmers and their stereotypes? Perhaps both?

  10. Sep 2016
  11. online.salempress.com.lacademy.idm.oclc.org online.salempress.com.lacademy.idm.oclc.org
    1. Bogotá is in the middle of Colombia

      city location

    2. While most of the country is in the Northern Hemisphere, the southern region stretches into the Southern Hemisphere,

      both hemishires

  12. Dec 2015
  13. Oct 2015
    1. Senate House Tyndall Avenue Bristol BS8 1TH United Kingdom

      schema for courses req D: locations

  14. Jul 2015