1,376 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2021
    1. 2021-03-30

    2. Østergaard, S. D., Schmidt, M., Horváth-Puhó, E., Thomsen, R. W., & Sørensen, H. T. (2021). Thromboembolism and the Oxford–AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine: Side-effect or coincidence? The Lancet, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(21)00762-5

    3. 10.1016/S0140-6736(21)00762-5
    4. By mid March, 2021, vaccination against COVID-19 using the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 (AZD1222) vaccine from Oxford–AstraZeneca1Ramasamy MN Minassian AM Ewer KJ et al.Safety and immunogenicity of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine administered in a prime-boost regimen in young and old adults (COV002): a single-blind, randomised, controlled, phase 2/3 trial.Lancet. 2021; 396: 1979-1993Summary Full Text Full Text PDF PubMed Scopus (55) Google Scholar,  2Voysey M Costa Clemens SA Madhi SA et al.Single-dose administration and the influence of the timing of the booster dose on immunogenicity and efficacy of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 (AZD1222) vaccine: a pooled analysis of four randomised trials.Lancet. 2021; 397: 881-891Summary Full Text Full Text PDF PubMed Scopus (3) Google Scholar was paused in a number of European countries due to reports of thromboembolic events in vaccinated individuals.3Wise J Covid-19: European countries suspend use of Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine after reports of blood clots.BMJ. 2021; 372: n699Crossref PubMed Scopus (0) Google Scholar According to the European Medicines Agency (EMA), 30 cases of thromboembolic events (predominantly venous) had been reported by March 10, 2021, among the approximately 5 million recipients of the Oxford–AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine in the European Economic Area.3Wise J Covid-19: European countries suspend use of Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine after reports of blood clots.BMJ. 2021; 372: n699Crossref PubMed Scopus (0) Google Scholar The EMA subsequently stated that “The number of thromboembolic events in vaccinated people is no higher than the number seen in the general population”.4European Medicines AgencyCOVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca: PRAC investigating cases of thromboembolic events - vaccine's benefits currently still outweigh risks - update.https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/news/covid-19-vaccine-astrazeneca-prac-investigating-cases-thromboembolic-events-vaccines-benefitsDate: March 11, 2021Date accessed: March 22, 2021Google Scholar To inform the ongoing discussion on the safety of the Oxford–AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine, we analysed nationwide population-based data from Denmark to estimate the natural incidence of venous thromboembolism.5
    5. Thromboembolism and the Oxford–AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine: side-effect or coincidence?
    1. 2021-04-01

    2. Rheumatology, T. L. (2021). Communication combats hesitancy. The Lancet Rheumatology, 3(4), e235. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2665-9913(21)00080-1

    3. 10.1016/S2665-9913(21)00080-1
    4. From the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, rheumatologists have been inundated with questions and concerns from their patients about whether their rheumatic disease, or the drugs they use to treat them, might increase their risk of COVID-19. With COVID-19 vaccination programmes now underway in many countries, patients' concerns have shifted toward questions about the vaccines and whether they are safe for them to receive. The short answer is yes.
    5. Communication combats hesitancy
    1. 2021-04-01

    2. Health, T. L. P. (2021). COVID-19 in France: Challenges and opportunities. The Lancet Public Health, 6(4), e192. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2468-2667(21)00054-2

    3. 10.1016/S2468-2667(21)00054-2
    4. In this issue of The Lancet Public Health, a series of papers present different aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic in France. In their nationwide epidemiological study, Jean Gaudart and colleagues analysed COVID-19 incidence, morbidity, mortality, and factors potentially associated with the first wave of infections in France. For Gaudart and colleagues, the country “could absorb the shock, thanks to a strong hospital system and a national lockdown”. In another study, Thomas Roederer and colleagues focused their analysis on one of the most vulnerable groups in society and assessed seroprevalence and risk factors in homeless people relocated to emergency shelters. They noted high exposure to SARS-CoV-2 and high asymptomatic seroprevalence. Living in crowded conditions was the strongest factor associated with exposure, underscoring the importance of providing safe, uncrowded accommodation, alongside adequate testing and public health information to this vulnerable population. The study by Michaël Schwarzinger and colleagues investigated COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and its determinants, such as vaccine characteristics or place of vaccination. Although most determinants were hypothetical at the time the study was done (July, 2020), such analyses are particularly important in a country where vaccine confidence has been persistently low. They estimated that 30% of adults were likely to refuse vaccination outright. Latest data from the CoviPrev survey suggest that this proportion has decreased from 32% in December, 2020, to 21% in February, 2021.
    5. COVID-19 in France: challenges and opportunities
  2. Mar 2021
    1. 2021-03-26

    2. Covid-19 vaccine wars: Developing the AstraZeneca vaccine was a triumph, but then things went wrong. (2021, March 26). The BMJ. https://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2021/03/26/vaccine-wars-developing-the-astrazeneca-vaccine-was-a-triumph-but-then-things-went-wrong/

    3. The UK’s tabloid press was having a field day. “NO, EU CAN’T HAVE OUR JABS” said the Daily Mail, a message echoed by the Daily Express with “WAIT YOUR TURN! SELFISH EU WANTS OUR VACCINES”. These headlines reflected a combination of triumphalism about the UK’s success in what, by common agreement, has been a remarkably successful vaccine rollout—especially when compared to the slower progress in the EU—anger that the decisions by certain national regulators a few days previously to suspend use of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine were somehow a punishment for Brexit, and indignation that these foreigners were trying to steal “our” vaccines. Inevitably, the reality is a little more complex.
    4. Covid-19 vaccine wars: developing the AstraZeneca vaccine was a triumph, but then things went wrong
    1. 2021-03-26

    2. Romano, A., Spadaro, G., Balliet, D., Joireman, J., Lissa, C. J. van, Jin, S., Agostini, M., Belanger, J., Gützkow, B., Kreienkamp, J., Collaboration, P., & Leander, P. (2021). Cooperation and Trust Across Societies During the COVID-19 Pandemic. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/f4qbz

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/f4qbz
    4. Cross-societal differences in cooperation and trust among strangers in the provision of public goods may be key to understanding how societies are managing the COVID-19 pandemic. We report a survey conducted across 41 societies between March and May 2020 (N = 34,526), and test pre-registered hypotheses about how cross-societal differences in cooperation and trust relate to prosocial COVID-19 responses (e.g., social distancing), stringency of policies, and support for behavioral regulations (e.g., mandatory quarantine). We further tested whether cross-societal variation in institutions and ecologies theorized to impact cooperation were associated with prosocial COVID-19 responses, including institutional quality, religiosity, and historical prevalence of pathogens. We found substantial variation across societies in prosocial COVID-19 responses, stringency of policies, and support for behavioral regulation. However, we found no consistent evidence to support the idea that cross-societal variation in cooperation and trust among strangers is associated with these outcomes related to the COVID-19 pandemic. These results were replicated with another independent cross-cultural COVID-19 dataset (N = 112,136), and in both snowball and representative samples. We discuss implications of our results, including challenging the assumption that managing the COVID-19 pandemic across societies is best modelled as a public goods dilemma.
    5. Cooperation and Trust Across Societies During the COVID-19 Pandemic
    1. 2021-03-27

    2. DiYanni, C. (2021). The Impact of COVID-19 on the Play of 3- to 10-year-old Children. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/mzasw

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/mzasw
    4. This study explored the impact of COVID-19 on the play of 3- to 10-year-old children. A survey of 67 parents of 79 children and interviews with 37 of those children revealed a few prominent trends in how the pandemic has affected play. First, children’s outdoor play increased in frequency from before the pandemic to the time spent in quarantine, and levels of outdoor play remained significantly higher in the fall months following quarantine. Similarly, the amount of unstructured, free play that children engaged in increased during quarantine, and remained significantly more common after quarantine than it was before the pandemic. Finally, screen time levels skyrocketed during quarantine, and remained higher in the fall months than they were pre-pandemic. These findings have implications for both parents and teachers in terms of assessing the impact of COVID-19 – both short-term and long-term – on the health and well-being of their children.
    5. The Impact of COVID-19 on the Play of 3- to 10-year-old Children
    1. 2021-03-29

    2. Isch, C., Beltran, D. G., Ayers, J., Alcock, J., Cronk, L., Hurmuz-Sklias, H., Tidball, K. G., Horn, A. V., Todd, P. M., & Aktipis, A. (2021). What predicts attitudes about mask wearing? PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/jvspx

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/jvspx
    4. What explains differences in attitudes towards wearing protective face masks to limit the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus? We investigated potential drivers of attitudes about mask wearing as part of a longitudinal study during the COVID-19 pandemic (N-participants = 711, N-countries = 36), focusing on people’s perceptions and feelings about seeing others in their local communities wearing masks. We found that both stress about COVID-19 and the local incidence rate of COVID-19 predicted these attitudes, but perceived risk of infection did not. We also found that older and politically right-leaning respondents tended to have more negative attitudes towards wearing masks, while those with more concern for future consequences have more positive attitudes. Individuals with a greater vulnerability to COVID-19 as well as those with increased disease-related stress reported inconsistent emotional reactions to seeing people wear masks in public. For example, older participants were likely to either strongly agree or strongly disagree that seeing others wear masks led to feelings of anxiety, and some individuals with high disease-related stress reported greater feelings of anxiety, whereas others reported increased feelings of safety, when seeing people wear masks in public. These findings highlight some of the demographic, psychological, and environmental factors that were associated with respondents’ attitudes toward face masks and will be of use to health policy efforts aiming to increase mask wearing and other protective behaviors.
    5. What predicts attitudes about mask wearing?
    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: ‘the SciBeh initiative is about bringing knowledge to policy makers and the general public, but I have to say this advert I just came across worries me: Where are the preceding data integrity and data analysis classes? Https://t.co/5LwkC1SVyF’ / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved 18 February 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1362344945697308674

    1. 2020-11-18

    2. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, November 18). @danielmabuse yes, we all make mistakes, but a responsible actor also factors the kinds of mistakes she is prone to making into decisions on what actions to take: I’m not that great with my hands, so I never contemplated being a neuro-surgeon. Not everyone should be a public voice on COVID [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1329002783094296577

    3. yes, we all make mistakes, but a responsible actor also factors the kinds of mistakes she is prone to making into decisions on what actions to take: I'm not that great with my hands, so I never contemplated being a neuro-surgeon. not everyone should be a public voice on COVID
    4. There is nothing wrong with making an error. But if your beliefs are based on a tenfold underestimation of risk they should change when that underestimation is corrected.
    5. A while back I queried the wisdom of reputable academics publishing on the Toby Young created website http://lockdownsceptics.org. This tweet this morning by its creator, I feel, sheds further light on that issueQuote Tweet
    1. 2021-03-07

    2. 2021-03-06

    3. Richard Dawkins on Twitter. (n.d.). Twitter. Retrieved 8 March 2021, from https://twitter.com/RichardDawkins/status/1368259842222268421

    4. OBVIOUSLY by “science’s truths”, I meant the truths about the real world that science aspires to find, NOT scientists’ beliefs during any particular historical era – phlogiston, etc. My point was only that there’s such a thing as objective reality – denied by postmodern pseuds.
    5. Science is not a social construct. Science’s truths were true before there were societies; will still be true after all philosophers are dead; were true before any philosophers were born; were true before there were any minds, even trilobite or dinosaur minds, to notice them.
    1. Special Track 3. (n.d.). Data for Policy CIC. Retrieved 8 March 2021, from https://dataforpolicy.org/data-fof-policy-2021/special-track-3/

    2. The COVID crisis has turned the world upside down. It has revealed societies’ fissures and pressure points as it has mercilessly revealed any lurking weaknesses in our existing systems and structures. The public and scientists have witnessed an explosion of scientific research across all disciplines –much it of understanding the nature of the virus itself—in addition to a well-spring of data science, meta-science and science communication, some of it drawing on state-of-the-art AI and machine learning tools designed to help scientists and non-scientists keep current on the explosion of knowledge. The pandemic has brought into sharp focus questions surrounding the development, discussion, and diffusion of research. The wider issues they raise as they pertain to the ways science is and could be conducted in online information environments, whether this is among scientists themselves, in the interaction between scientists and policy-makers, or in interaction with the general public. This special track will consider what we have learned as we emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic.  What are the tools, systems, data governance models and types of experts that we need to foster science and help maximize its societal benefits well beyond the pandemic context? We will pay special attention to the role of media in the dissemination of new scientific findings alongside misinformation: expediency, if nothing else, during the pandemic has necessitated the use of extant social media platforms for science-to-science, science-to-policy, and science-to-public discourse.
    3. Arguments, algorithms and tools: what do we need to shape policy and confront misinformation post-pandemic?
    1. 2021-03-06

    2. Stephan Lewandowsky. (2021, March 6). 25 March deadline for submissions to our ‘special track’ https://t.co/qwLxCCSjks at Data for Policy conference, 14-16 September at UCL. Please consider submitting @SciBeh @stefanmherzog @Sander_vdLinden https://t.co/A8KSC1Tkh9 [Tweet]. @STWorg. https://twitter.com/STWorg/status/1368280722709110789

    3. 25 March deadline for submissions to our "special track" https://dataforpolicy.org/data-fof-policy-2021/special-track-3/… at Data for Policy conference, 14-16 September at UCL. Please consider submitting @SciBeh @stefanmherzog @Sander_vdLinden
    1. 2021-03-02

    2. Jonathan Rothberg 🦋. (2021, March 2). Testing works. I test daily. Insist on HOME testing. @michaelmina_lab @JoeBiden Research suggests B.1.526 needs to be closely watched “for its ability to evade both monoclonal antibody and, to a certain extent, the vaccine-induced antibody,” said Fauci [Tweet]. @JMRothberg. https://twitter.com/JMRothberg/status/1366755339912306688

    3. Testing works. I test daily. Insist on HOME testing. @michaelmina_lab @JoeBiden Research suggests B.1.526 needs to be closely watched “for its ability to evade both monoclonal antibody and, to a certain extent, the vaccine-induced antibody,” said Fauci
    1. 2020-05-06

    2. Early government intervention is key to reducing the spread of COVID-19. (2020, May 6). Science & Research News | Frontiers. https://blog.frontiersin.org/2020/05/06/early-government-intervention-is-key-to-reducing-the-spread-of-covid-19/

    3. Early and strict governmental intervention is a key factor in reducing the spread of COVID-19 cases. That’s the conclusion reached by a team of researchers comparing outbreaks of the novel coronavirus between the Chinese province of Hunan and Italy in a new paper published in Frontiers in Medicine.
    4. Early government intervention is key to reducing the spread of COVID-19
    1. 2020-10-26

    2. Trout, L. J., & Kleinman, A. (2020). Covid-19 Requires a Social Medicine Response. Frontiers in Sociology, 5. https://doi.org/10.3389/fsoc.2020.579991

    3. 10.3389/fsoc.2020.579991
    4. Covid-19 is an inherently social disease, with exposure, illness, care, and outcomes stratified along familiar social, economic, and racial lines. However, interventions from public health and clinical medicine have focused primarily on the scale-up of technical and biomedical solutions that fail to address the social contexts driving its distribution and burden. Fused with a moment of reckoning with racial injustice and economic inequality in the U.S. and across the world, these disparities charge policy leaders to develop, study, and share a response grounded in social medicine. As a yardstick for formulating, evaluating, and implementing health policy and care delivery, social medicine recommends at least three things: integrating health, social, and economic responses; bringing care to the points of greatest need; and focusing on broad equity-driven reforms in the pandemic's wake. With these tools, Covid-19 presents us with an opportunity to address the inequities that the disease highlights, exploits, and may otherwise entrench.
    5. Covid-19 Requires a Social Medicine Response
    1. 2021-03-05

    2. Covid One Year Ago. (2021, March 5). Modelling assumes that suppression measures can be sustained for a maximum of 3-4 months, so introducing early ’lockdown’-style measures to stop the disease is judged likely to lead only to a more deadly resurgence later on when they are lifted https://t.co/QRxgRj3jW3 https://t.co/pbqTAVGDfG [Tweet]. @YearCovid. https://twitter.com/YearCovid/status/1367778417437929472

    3. Planning continues under the assumption that no vaccine will be available https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/904538/S0641_COVID-19_compared_with_NSRA_2019_Pandemic_Influenza_planning_assumptions.pdf… 5/5
    4. Government behavioural scientists raise the risk of "public concern if interventions that are perceived to be effective [in other countries] are not applied" in the UK, and are divided on the likely public reaction to a policy of only partial isolation https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/887574/04-spi-b-insights-on-combined-behavioural-and-social-interventions.pdf…
    5. Modelling assumes that suppression measures can be sustained for a maximum of 3-4 months, so introducing early 'lockdown'-style measures to stop the disease is judged likely to lead only to a more deadly resurgence later on when they are lifted https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/891855/S0039_SAGE13_MRC_Imperial_Timing_and_Triggering_of_NPIs.pdf…
    6. 5 March 2020 The UK 'optimal policy' is shown in red: avoid strong measures to suppress the virus early on, allowing infections to develop over the summer months while suppressing the peak to 4,500 deaths/day, and reaching herd immunity by September. https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/891855/S0039_SAGE13_MRC_Imperial_Timing_and_Triggering_of_NPIs.pdf…
    7. 5 Mar 2020 Today's SAGE papers reveal the emergence of what would come to be known as the UK's "herd immunity" strategy: allowing healthier people to gradually catch the virus and develop immunity, while 'cocooning' those more likely to die if infected https://gov.uk/government/collections/sage-meetings-march-2020#meeting-13,-5-march-2020…
    1. 2020-11-18

    2. Sabin Vaccine Institute on Twitter. (n.d.). Twitter. Retrieved 5 March 2021, from https://twitter.com/sabinvaccine/status/1329160621485662208

    3. Join Sabin & @UNICEF for the final webinar of our three-part series on Vaccination Misinformation Control & Prevention! This webinar will focus on insights for #ImmunizationProfessionals on inoculation against harmful vaccine #misinformation. Registerhttps://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_QnXkgTxBSyW-k9Ov8mgSQw
    1. 2020-11-25

    2. MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis on Twitter. (n.d.). Twitter. Retrieved 5 March 2021, from https://twitter.com/MRC_Outbreak/status/1331677485122121732

    3. Authors: @mathModInf @sangeeta0312 TaraMangal @EttieUnwin NatsukoImai @ginacd1 @DrCWalters @ElitaJaun HelenaBayley @mara_kont AndriaMousa @lilithwhittles @SRileyIDD @neil_ferguson
    4. UPDATE #COVID19 3.8% of children with COVID19 experience severe or critial symptoms No evidence for difference nr infected asymptomatic children compared to general population Children’s susceptibility & onward transmissibility still unclear https://imperial.ac.uk/mrc-global-infectious-disease-analysis/covid-19/covid-19-reports/
    1. 2020-12-05

    2. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, December 5). @DrMRooke @sTeamTraen @STWorg this is a book that Amazon also sells- seems fascinating enough to me ;-) https://t.co/dDSV4s7TW7 [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1335242748249706497

    3. this is a book that Amazon also sells- seems fascinating enough to me ;-)
    4. You could probably get away with a medical history book titled something like "How Vaccines Saved America / Europe". But, in the end, you would only really be pitching it at the Pro-Science Market.
    5. Are there many pro-vaccine books? It seems such a banal topic to write on ("Yes, vaccines are great. No, they won't hurt you. The end"). Can't see anyone getting a million-dollar advance for that.
    6. It was inevitable, really
    7. .@SciBeh wow--concerning indeed.Quote Tweet
    1. 2020-11-26

    2. Ira, still wearing a mask, Hyman. (2020, November 26). @SciBeh @Quayle @STWorg @jayvanbavel @UlliEcker @philipplenz6 @AnaSKozyreva @johnfocook Some might argue the moral dilemma is between choosing what is seen as good for society (limiting spread of disinformation that harms people) and allowing people freedom of choice to say and see what they want. I’m on the side of making good for society decisions. [Tweet]. @ira_hyman. https://twitter.com/ira_hyman/status/1331992594130235393

    3. and I don't think 'freedom rights' anywhere guarantee delivery as opposed to a (mere) opportunity to seek out....
    4. interesting idea, but I think not applicable to what was described: certain types of posts are "being demoted" not blocked... - users still have the 'freedom' to seek out that content. They are just not being preferentially *served* that content.
    5. Some might argue the moral dilemma is between choosing what is seen as good for society (limiting spread of disinformation that harms people) and allowing people freedom of choice to say and see what they want. I'm on the side of making good for society decisions.
    6. quite possibly! ;-) ...but they are invested in the idea that correct diagnosis raises the chance of successful intervention..... and, while the leopard might win on this occasion, on average that premise (which seems to me what science is all about) is likely true
    7. "Well it's not a *moral* dilemma!" cry the academics as the leopard eats their faces
    8. indeed, that is the definition I am familiar with. Tobacco/Facebook may face a choice between profits vs. lives/democracy, but that is not a moral dilemma. The reason this is important is because good-faith actors can face agonizing moral dilemmas, but here we have something else
    9. because we're all scientists, and precision matters: "Moral dilemmas, at the very least, involve conflicts between moral requirements. Consider the cases given below." https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/moral-dilemmas/… => definition of moral dilemma is a conflict between two moral imperatives
    10. By definition "A moral dilemma is a situation in which a person is torn between right and wrong." In some cases, it can include competing moral virtues (e.g., deontology vs. utilitarianism). But that needn't be the case.
    11. Yeah agree with you on the main point but wouldn't say "moral" is irrelevant here. Presenting the dilemma as such suggests there is no morally-right thing to do, when there is, and thus hands platform a license to maintain the status quo. Prob wasn't the intended point but still.
    12. Seems like you're missing the point of the tweet by focussing on an irrelevant detail. A perverse incentive makes it unlikely for social media companies to act in society's interests, let's focus on that.
    13. Well, it may be a capitalist dilemma but I don't see it as a *moral* dilemma. If my product kills people (e.g. tobacco) it's not a moral "dilemma" whether I deny that to keep pushing it--it's a moral travesty. How is this different?
    14. The dilemma is between prioritizing the self interest of the company and its shareholders vs. society. In many ways, it's a classic social dilemma.
    15. .@jayvanbavel Umm, where is the moral dilemma exactly? @SciBeh @philipplenz6 @AnaSKozyreva @UlliEcker @johnfocook
    1. 2020-11-30

    2. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: ‘RT @socpsychupdate: Here’s your guide to #AIMOS2020 Register (for free, if you want): Https://t.co/v8HvrWwxM9 Find a session you like in o…’ / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved 5 March 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1333406904786235393

    3. Here's your guide to #AIMOS2020 Register (for free, if you want): https://aimos.community/2020-membership-and-registration… Find a session you like in our program: https://sydney.edu.au/content/dam/corporate/documents/sydney-law-school/news/aimos-conference-schedule-web.pdf… Find its time and the zoom link on our schedule (cross-ref'd by time zone): https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/10YtGxHU3tciYeyqFeNcj8AWIrHnMirnlu2OuBNniHxs/edit?usp=sharing… Relax (you earned it)!
    4. 2020-12-01

    5. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, December 1). A rather concise argument... [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1333814979095650305

    6. a rather concise argument...
    1. 2020-10-07

    2. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: ‘Check out “Campaign for Social Science Annual SAGE Lecture 2020” https://t.co/cXN3nErdFV @EventbriteUK’ / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved 5 March 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1335898102558035968

    3. Check out "Campaign for Social Science Annual SAGE Lecture 2020" https://eventbrite.co.uk/e/campaign-for-social-science-annual-sage-lecture-2020-tickets-129009513929?utm-medium=discovery&utm-campaign=social&utm-content=attendeeshare&aff=estw&utm-source=tw&utm-term=listing… @EventbriteUK
    1. 2020-12-07

    2. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, December 7). Science of Behavioral Change Capstone Conference: Celebrating Accomplishments and Looking to the Future Register now for this Feb. 22-23 NIH virtual event https://t.co/tw5QiDuJBB [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1335909129861337088

    3. Science of Behavioral Change Capstone Conference: Celebrating Accomplishments and Looking to the Future Register now for this Feb. 22-23 NIH virtual event https://commonfund.nih.gov/sobc-capstonemeeting/registration