92 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. theliturgists.com theliturgists.com
    1. THE SUNDAY THING

      The Sunday Thing

      The love of money is the root of all evil

      This week, Michael Gungor asked us to discuss money in our breakout groups.

      Money is power

      We outsource our power and authority to those who claim to have greater access to capital, because we underestimate and undervalue our own social influence, economic capacity, and political agency. The entreprecariat is designed for learned helplessness (social: individualism), trained incapacities (economic: specialization), and bureaucratic intransigence (political: authoritarianism). https://hypothes.is/a/667dOC0bEeyV6Itx3ySxmw

      Indigenous cultures in Canada were disempowered by outlawing the cultural practice of generosity (potlatch) and replacing the practice with centralized power over the medium of exchange: money. Money is a mechanism of disempowerment.

      Money is a shared story we tell ourselves about what has value. https://www.npr.org/transcripts/795246685

      We translated “ekklesia” as church. It is the deliberative body of the experiment in democracy in Athens, Greece. The people who are figuring out how to live together in the commons. The work of the people. The Liturgists.


      The Story of Money

      In this hour, On the Media looks at the story of money, from its uncertain origins to its digital reinvention in the form of cryptocurrency.

      On the Media: Full Faith & Credit


      Squid Game

      People were also discussing Squid Game.

      Squid Game was on my mind today before the call. “The reality of the history of Canada’s mining industry makes #SquidGame look like child’s play.” https://twitter.com/bauhouse/status/1449726452098682881?s=20

      The truth is that all of the gold that was mined out of the Klondike was under Indigenous land. There was no treaty with any of Indigenous peoples in the Yukon.

      Commons: Mining

  3. imaginaxiom.com imaginaxiom.com
    1. However, we know that money is a fiction, a story that we tell ourselves. Money is a story about what and who has value. This scale of human value that we call money is fake. But if enough people believe it, that idea of money becomes our reality.

      On the Media

      The Story of Money

      Full Faith & Credit

      In this hour, On the Media looks at the story of money, from its uncertain origins to its digital reinvention in the form of cryptocurrency.

    1. In this hour, On the Media looks at the story of money, from its uncertain origins to its digital reinvention in the form of cryptocurrency.

      The Story of Money

      Ten autumns ago came two watershed moments in the history of money. In September 2008, the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers triggered a financial meltdown from which the world has yet to fully recover. The following month, someone using the name Satoshi Nakamoto introduced BitCoin, the first cryptocurrency. Before our eyes, the very architecture of money was evolving — potentially changing the world in the process. In this hour, On the Media looks at the story of money, from its uncertain origins to its digital reinvention in the form of cryptocurrency.

    1. So the story that emerges about the origins of money is very different than the way we usually think about it. In this model embraced by Bill and other anthropologists, money is partly a mechanism of social obligation and partly a mechanism to keep track of who owes what to whom. It's also a mechanism that cements the relationship between ordinary people and authorities who maintain records. In other words, it's a story about power.
    1. The Natural Navigator (Tristan Gooley) is worth a look as it is how these people would have seen the world. We live in a world of clock and compass while they lived by a circle, wind and light. I also wonder what other surviving memory methods there are out there like maybe the Story Knife from Alaska?

      These may be worth looking into.

  4. Sep 2021
  5. Aug 2021
    1. I joined Caldera in November of 1995, and we certainly used "open source" broadly at that time. We were building software. I can't imagine a world where we did not use the specific phrase "open source software". And we were not alone. The term "Open Source" was used broadly by Linus Torvalds (who at the time was a student...I had dinner with Linus and his then-girlfriend Ute in Germany while he was still a student)

      From Linus Torvalds Remembers the Days Before ‘Open Source’:

      Torvalds counters that “I wouldn’t trust Lyle Ball’s recollection 100% about me… since my girlfriend-at-the-time (now wife) name was Tove, not Ute.”

  6. Jul 2021
    1. The deity commanded that the Moonstone should be watched, from that time forth, by three priests in turn, night and day, to the end of the generations of men. And the Brahmins heard, and bowed before his will. The deity predicted certain disaster to the presumptuous mortal who laid hands on the sacred gem, and to all of his house and name who received it after him.

      Through this paragraph, the author talks about the uniqueness of the moonstone as the only one escaped from the rapacity, and shows the spiritual myth behind the Moonstone. I feel it makes the moonstone more mysterious. The deity's prediction that disasters will happen to the ones who laid hands on the sacred gem lays a foundation for the rest of the story related to stealing the Moonstone. It also stimulates curiosity for the readers to test whether this sacred dream will be validated by the story or not.

  7. May 2021
    1. Erich Segal

      Reasonably certain that this is the same Erich Segal who wrote the screenplays for Love Story and The Yellow Submarine.

      Also interesting that the movie The Paper Chase is advertised on the same page as this story.

  8. Apr 2021
    1. Unfortunately, there is some urgency to this effort. As Shashi Tharoor writes in his book Inglorious Empire (2018), over the past 30 years, there has been a tremendous bout of collective amnesia, espeically in the UK, about the history of empire and its consequences. Into this vacuum, revisionist historians of the worst kind like Niall Ferguson have capitalized on historical blind spots of people living today to make an absurd case for the benefits of empire. This cannot be allowed to happen. Tharoor believes that one of the best bulwarks against this erasure is to do the work of inquiry and to make the history of empire accessible and apparent to the widest audience. It is into this effort that I submit my work. John Company is an unsparing portrait that hopefully will give its players a sense of the nature of empire and the long half-life of its cultural production. It is certainly not the only way to make a game about empire, but I hope that it does its part in adding to our understanding of that subject and its continued legacy.
    1. As a result of all this in a couple of weeks I had a working version of empty (http://www.sourceforge.net/projects/empty) which allows to start interactive programs and communicate with them using FIFO-files
    1. Around &Bigger the box is bigger: 75mm high instead of 45mm or so.That was the main reason for the name &Bigger. The first edition does fit in its box but very tight. Because the first factory used bigger cardboard than planned. They told me about this "upgrade" after they produced the game. The thicker tiles (about 2.5mm) did feel good for the game so the &Bigger edition has the same
    1. What's the point of playing a game featuring fjords without also including vikings to pillage the other player's lands...I've actually developed two additional tiles for Fjords: The Dragon and The Marauding Hoard. Both do exactly that.(I've play tested them with a friend well over 40 times and we both agree that with an expanded set of Fjords tiles, these two greatly improve the game for us. I'll write the tiles up and post them to BGG... eventually)
    1. Enter 2020: Matt and Jordan managed to scrape together some illustrations for playtesting, but they weren’t up to the bar of a production game. Fortunately, we connected through friends with Jaehee, and she cautiously listened to the pitch for the game. Once she decided to join the team, the artwork and designs quality improved by orders of magnitude, to the point where we had an experience we felt was worthwhile sharing publicly.
  9. Mar 2021
    1. If you want to know more about the story behind this best-selling game, check out the New Yorker Article.
    2. A Dark Room makes use of the ProMotion and BubbleWrap gems. During its development Amir used all the refactoring techniques of the Ruby language and also ran the built-in spec framework in the background
    3. Not enjoying Xcode, Amir used RubyMotion instead. Amir had real-world experience with Xcode and Objective-C, but didn't like it at all. Amir also has a Ruby background and went with RubyMotion to build A Dark Room. The command-line interface, the testing framework, the gems libraries and the CocoaPods integration and the freedom to use any text editor contributed to his decision.
    1. Originally he had used the terms usage scenarios and usage case – the latter a direct translation of his Swedish term användningsfall – but found that neither of these terms sounded natural in English, and eventually he settled on use case.
    1. TRAILBLAZER-STORY will follow as it turned out to be inevitable for setting up application state for tests. Instead of fumbling around with factories and traits in your tests, you “tell a story” about what to create in which order, easily customizable, and all written using activities.
    1. One day last August 2018, I stumbled upon an online petition that sparked my curiosity - We Want Serverless Ruby. At that time, none of the major cloud providers had first-class support for Ruby in their serverless products. There were ~1400 devs signing that petition, and I wondered if there was something about Ruby that made it unsuitable for FaaS. I decided to roll the sleeves and start building what would be the first PoC of faastRuby.
  10. Feb 2021
    1. Good intentions, but I doubt there's any relation of the origin of the terms blacklist/whitelist to race. There are many idioms and phrases in the English language that make use of colours without any racial backstories. I haven't met any black person (myself included) who was ever offended by the use of "blacklist".
    1. Are designers also wasting the time of the critics?

      Wow what a way to end the chapter. Are instcutional Designers wasting their time decorating their instruction or filling them with jargon that they miss the point of educating the learners.

      This is a wonderful story about something that anyone could be familiar with and understand how instrucitonal design can go at times. Lending to the attractiveness and lacking on the informing side.

  11. Dec 2020
    1. Regardless of measurable impact, Svelte resonates with our emotions and it makes for a good story.
    1. For safety reasons, certain pumps and sprayers cannot be returned to the store if opened.

      More likely: they don't want to deal with these returns because of risk to store and because they want to keep the money they made from the sale.

  12. Nov 2020
  13. Oct 2020
    1. The dormancy of 2013-2017 might just be because people got bored of the genre.

      Just like Hallmark movies, romcoms are known for having similar story lines

  14. Sep 2020
  15. Jul 2020
  16. May 2020
  17. Mar 2020
    1. I came upon a great idea that would put an end to these ceaseless interrogations by my comrade. 'We are five or six friends', I told him some time later, 'who are in charge of the same mathematics curriculum at various universities. Let us all come together and regulate these matters once and for all, and after this, I shall be delivered of these questions.' I was unaware of the fact that Bourbaki was born at that instant.
  18. Jan 2020
  19. Dec 2019
    1. Leigh Hunt’s “Rimini.”

      The Story of Rimini was composed by Leigh Hunt and published in 1816. The poem is based on Hunt's reading of Paolo and Francesca in hell, famously told in Dante's Inferno (Circle 2, Canto 5). Hunt's version is sympathetic to how the two lovers came together after Francesca was married to Paolo's brother. The lovers were later punished for the fraternal transgression. The poem advocates for compassion for all of humanity.

  20. Nov 2019
    1. It also means recognizing that our civic infrastructure was built for the normative perpetuation of a status quo that is morally wrong and fundamentally unsustainable. As a society, we don’t need to agree on policy choice, problem framing, or ideology. But can we agree to build the infrastructure needed to have those conversations? Can we move toward centering different stories?
    2. Make no mistake: this isn’t a technology issue, but a civil rights issue. Unfortunately, there’s a lot of jargon (technical terminology, marketing hype, legalese), keeping communities from engaging in the wave of data collection and technology procurement that will shape how social services like education, welfare, and child protection are delivered for decades to come. There’s little space for the meaningful and collaborative radical reimagining of alternative futures when the public is repeatedly told that the revolution is already here and they just don’t understand it.
  21. Oct 2019
    1. Walmart is a place of opportunity. Here, you can go as far as your hard work and talent will take you.Our associates are building better lives for their families, and we’re proud to be a part of their success stories. We’re investing in our associates by offering competitive pay, advanced training through Walmart Academies, career development through our Pathways training program and, most of all, a chance to move up. No matter what goals our associates set for themselves, we want to help them grow professionally and personally. To that end, we offer a variety of education benefits.Training and Opportunity Walmart Academies is an immersive training program that is tied to a working supercenter, allowing associates to receive both classroom and sales floor training in advanced retail skills and soft skills like leadership, communications and change management. In 2018 alone, we trained 450,000 associates including frontline supervisors, department managers and assistant managers in our Academies.A new video game called Spark City lets anyone “play” as a department manager. Through the game, associates enrolled in Walmart Academies learn the same techniques and processes that they will use on the sales floor in real life. The game is free to the public on the Apple app store and the Google Play store.In Walmart’s fiscal year 2019 we promoted more than 215,000 people to higher-paying jobs with increased responsibility.More than 75% of our salaried store management teams started as hourly associates.Store managers, on average, earn $175,000 annually and manage and help mentor 300 associates.Full- and part-time associates are eligible for quarterly bonuses based on store performance. In Walmart’s fiscal year 2019, hourly associates earned nearly $800 million in bonuses.We’ve converted nearly 175,000 associates from part-time to full-time in fiscal year 2019.
  22. Sep 2019
    1. A narrative weaves together otherwise isolated bits of information into a meaningful whole, linking them in important ways but also chunking the information so that it takes up less space in working memory and connects to existing threads in long-term memory
  23. May 2019
    1. Known as the "grandfather of micro-brewing in Canada," John Mitchell helped design Howe Sound Brewery in 1996, working with founders Stephen Shard, Dave Fenn and Colleen Fenn.
    2. Proudly brewing award-winning ales in Squamish for over 20 years, we owe much of our early success to John Mitchell. He co-pioneered North America's first modern craft brewery at Horseshoe Bay on BC's spectacular Howe Sound back in 1982, with the assistance of Frank Appleton. The pair began what has become known as the "craft brewing renaissance."
    1. Why Siding 14?  It's  a nod to our rich Alberta and western Canadian railway heritage.  Before the town of Ponoka was named, it was Siding 14 of the Calgary-Edmonton Railway Company.  The siding was a supply point  for steam locomotives making the run between the two major cities.  The railway  not only provided transportation between small towns and major centers, it was  historically the heart of communication and social interaction in communities across the province.
    1. Maybe we should just start a brewery that makes what we like to drink?
    2. The Ross brothers decided to start their own brewery while attending Maryland Deathfest.
    1. Field Engineer Story

      First field engineer in the field of telecommunications and networks:

      Telecommunication engineering has seen immense advances in the recent years and thus, the role of a field engineer has also evolved. Telecommunication engineering is among the most evolving industries in the world. It is a branch of electrical engineering and it dates back to the 18th century when there were beacons and telegraphs used for communication.

      The first field engineer in the field of telecommunications and networks was Claude Chappe, who was a French engineer. Then we have a long list of field engineers such as Thomas Edison, Carlos Slim, and many more. After the advent of computer networks and the internet in the 20th century, the role of a field engineer completely changed.

      Who created the first telecom company that offers a link between consumer and employees?

      The telecom industry is expected to expand even more in the coming years, but to date, the world's top telecommunication companies have reached a market value of over $50 billion. China Mobile Ltd., Verizon Communications Inc., and AT&T Inc. are the leaders in the world of telecommunication service providers. These companies serve as a link between the consumer and the employees, allowing them to communicate whether they're using traditional wired telephones or mobile phones.

      We created the FE On Demand Freelance Marketplace Platform to streamline engagement between field engineers and businesses looking for them.

  24. Feb 2019
    1. INVEST

      According to this checklist, a User Story should be:

      Indepedent (of all others)

      Negociable (not a specific contract for features)

      Valuable (or vertical)

      Estimable (to a good approximation)

      Small (so as to fit within an iteration)

      Testable (in principle, even if there isn't a test for it yet)

      Source(s):

      1. Glossary: INVEST - Agile Alliance
      2. INVEST at XP 1-2-3 by Bill Wake
  25. Jan 2019
    1. "A story should be seen as a battle," and went on abbut strategies, attacks, victory, etc.) Conflict, competition, stress, struggle,

      A story can be used as a rhetorical weapon.

    2. The skillful hunters then would come staggering back with a load of meat, a lot of ivory, and a story.

      This makes me think of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's TED Talk: "The danger of a single story." Rather than solely focusing on the single story aspect, Adichie delves into the topic of storytelling and the subsequent power associated with it. In this sense, the discussion of power alludes to Foucault's extensive work on power.

      https://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story/transcript?language=en

  26. Jul 2018
  27. Nov 2017
    1. „Gość Niedzielny": „Młodzi ludzie nie kryją, że noszenie patriotycznych ciuchów jest z ich strony formą manifestacji poglądów, wręcz swoistym wyznaniem wiary".On Interia: „Rośnie zainteresowanie odzieżą z symboliką patriotyczną. Noszą ją ludzie na ulicach, biegacze w parkach czy celebryci. To już nie jest chwilowa moda".„Polska The Times Plus": „Jedni mówią przy tej okazji o renesansie patriotyzmu, inni o modzie bardzo powierzchownej, bo istotą patriotyzmu jest wnętrze człowieka".

      2017.11 RZ "Red is bed"

  28. Mar 2017
    1. I want to us to have all sorts of biographies, all sorts of photos of unknown urchins with whom we may connect.

      personal research local

      difficulty of frame - of readability - of length

    1. I never regret the eleven months which hardened my resolve, to go beyond 98 'Nos' to get to the precious, unexpected 'Yes's'. I was nobody, I was selling nothing, I could be nobody selling anything.

      Numbers

      Statistics

      Alienation

    2. I realized that what sold was not the script but the connection of excitement, the acceleration of a heart beat, the comic tone, the sudden absurd eruption in the life of another.

      Facts count for nothing.

      Excitement. - Career? Power? Attachment? Identification? Meaning? Numbers?

    3. The people on the other end were targets. They were nothing. They were nobody.

      Alienation.

      Targets.

      Capitalism

    1. With only an hour face-to-face meeting with my friend Claude Tregoat we set up connections for 500 students in a project which would become to be known as CLAVIER.

      Taking the risk to be open.

      Feeling of being uncomfortable when first confronted with explaining a potential project - that reminds me of conversations with Maritta and Leena.

  29. Jan 2017
    1. Many people implicitly or explicitly use this cognitive outsourcing model to think about augmentation. It's commonly used in press accounts, for instance. It is also, I believe, a common way for programmers to think about augmentation. In this essay, we've seen a different way of thinking about augmentation. Rather than just solving problems expressed in terms we already understand, the goal is to change the thoughts we can think:

      Good distinctions here. Cf. also what happens when one begins to master the heptapod language in "Story of Your Life." It's Whorf-Sapir, but a "soft" Whorf-Sapir. So I'd say, anyhow. Relevant too that Engelbart discusses Whorf-Sapir.

  30. Nov 2016
  31. Sep 2016
    1. It's like getting really drunk at a party and spilling your guts in front of everyone and feeling incredibly great and cathartic about it, and then waking up the next morning and realizing what a complete fool you made of yourself."
    1. Are the Killjoys the heroes? If you want to look at it in a nihilistic 15-year-old point of view, watching A Clockwork Orange for the first time, I guess you could see them as the heroes. Are Better Living Industries (BLI) really the bad guys? Who’s the bad guy? I feel like The Girl just wants to hang out with her cat.
    1. The goal of ethnography, as Malinowski put it, is “to grasp the native’s point of view, his relation to life, to realize his vision of his world.”

      Not to just study the culture, to study from within the culture. (English lit, one story) Ethnographers look past culture's "one story" to live in people's individual stories

    1. There will be a · 1 · · · h I ·11 d gtr s1ttmg opposite me w 0 w1 won er why I have not been flirt-ing with her

      This is our first indication throughout the book that David views women differently than the average man. We don't yet know the real reason why, especially since he then refers to "his" Hella. According to Juliet Gardiner, Baldwin's implication here is consistent with the wold wide view of women in the 50's. They were expected to be perfect wives and mothers, and often flirted with and arguably viewed as an object of entertainment.

  32. Aug 2016
    1. I wanted to record civil breakdown by degrees ... it's not all at once, it's not, you flip a switch and suddenly people are dog-eat-dog and regard everything in a Darwinian, animalistic way. I think that it starts subtly ... you walk into a restaurant and the maitre d' does not see you to your table, but just waves at it. Or doormen no longer carry groceries for the elderly. It's that little.
  33. Jul 2016
    1. Fuck You, I'm Stealing Home: A baseball themed band that toured the coast playing primarily basements and selling matchbooks with our name on them. The oddity of the theme alone helped move some serious units.
    2. Aftermath: My first band when I was 12, named after the fourth Rolling Stones' (our biggest and practically only influence) album (Aftermath), and also because we rehearsed after math (well, school).
    3. New York City Rhythm: Just straight up ripped off the title of a Barry Manilow song. At this point I was starting to become proud of the fact that I had no shame in admitting I liked what some might refer to as the more shameful side of AM Gold. 
  34. Jun 2016
    1. “The time we were opened to that world is when we talk to other bands. People who are great people, amazing musicians. Then they release a new song, and I’m like, ‘That’s not them. I’ve been on tour with them for months, that’s something they would not do. That’s where we’ve seen it the most, honestly.” When it is suggested those artists drank the Kool-Aid, Joseph adjusts the metaphor, replacing “drank” with “served.” “They weren’t given a choice. They were painted into a situation where they were going to get shelved or a plug was going to get pulled, by people in control who think they know [what works].”
    1. For the sixteen-track album, the band invented fifteen fictional personas, each with its own sound, aesthetic, and backstory that draw from different decades of club culture. Genres range from Studio 1 reggae to indie rock, under pseudonyms like Burning Phlegm, White Virgins, and Noah's Dark.
    1. But even if being in PUP sounds like a living nightmare for Babcock, it’s all he’s got. Gig or no gig, he’s waking up most mornings on the floor with more apologies than dollars in the bank, coming to the same conclusion over and over again: that voice in my head telling me I’m a loser was right all along.
  35. Feb 2016
    1. I instantly knew it was something I wanted to do

      I love your story and want you to continue to sharpen it. I think it speaks volumes. Explaining what you felt in this moment, what appealed to you, how it shaped your vision might take this story one step closer to really helping your reader get a sense of your motivations from this moment.

    1. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.

      A third grade student should be able to refer to different parts of a text by using specific vocabulary such as "chapter" or "stanza" to identify key details in the text.

      Parts of a Story

      A good example of this would be chapters books for third graders such as books from the Junie B. Jones series. These allow students to recall details from the text by referring to specific chapters of sections of the book.

  36. Nov 2015
    1. In one version of this experiment, if we gave participants synthetic oxytocin (in the nose, that will reach the brain in an hour), they donated to 57 percent more of the featured charities and donated 56 percent more money than participants given a placebo. Those who received oxytocin also reported more emotional transportation into the world depicted in the ad. Most importantly, these people said they were less likely to engage in the dangerous behaviors shown in the ads. So, go see a movie and laugh and cry. It’s good for your brain, and just might motivate you to make positive changes in your life and in others’ lives as well.
    2. Once a story has sustained our attention long enough, we may begin to emotionally resonate with story’s characters. Narratologists call this “transportation,” and you experience this when your palms sweat as James Bond trades blows with a villain on top of a speeding train.
    3. Any Hollywood writer will tell you that attention is a scarce resource. Movies, TV shows, and books always include “hooks” that make you turn the page, stay on the channel through the commercial, or keep you in a theater seat. Scientists liken attention to a spotlight. We are only able to shine it on a narrow area. If that area seems less interesting than some other area, our attention wanders.
    4. This evidence supports the view of some narrative theorists that there is a universal story structure. These scholars claim every engaging story has this structure, called the dramatic arc. It starts with something new and surprising, and increases tension with difficulties that the characters must overcome, often because of some failure or crisis in their past, and then leads to a climax where the characters must look deep inside themselves to overcome the looming crisis, and once this transformation occurs, the story resolves itself. 
  37. Oct 2015
  38. Aug 2015
    1. Seneca Creation Story

      This Seneca story was recorded by Jeremiah Curtin, a white man fluent in the Seneca language. In 1883, 1886, and 1887, Curtin spent many hours talking with Seneca men and women on the Cattaraugus reservation in New York state. The largest of the five tribes of the Iroquois confederacy, the Seneca had inhabited much of central New York in the sixteenth century, but by the mid-seventeenth century they had moved west to Lake Erie and south into Pennsylvania. Curtin recorded this tale in the Seneca language, and it was subsequently translated into English by I. W. B. Hewitt. Source: Jeremiah Curtin and I. W. B. Hewitt, “Seneca Fiction, Legends and Myths, Part 1,” Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology 32 (1910–11 [1918])

      I would like you to read it as an origin story. That is, think about it as it explains the creation of humanity.

      What is the relationship between humanity and nature? What structure do you think society will take based on this origin story? These are questions I want you to think about and seek the answers to while you do this reading

    1. The First Book of Moses, Called Genesis

      This is the first chapter of Genesis from the King James version of the Bible. While I realize that this is clearly a religious text, I would like you to read it as an origin story. That is, think about it as it explains the creation of humanity.

      What is the relationship between humanity and nature? What structure do you think society will take based on this origin story? Who authorizes this text? Why? These are questions I want you to think about and seek the answers to while you do this reading

    1. As soon as computer data entry moved from punch-cards to online files (in the mid/late 1960s) there were "commands" for accomplishing this operation.
  39. Jan 2015
    1. But if you turn data into a money-printing machine for citizens, whereby we all become entrepreneurs, that will extend the financialization of everyday life to the most extreme level, driving people to obsess about monetizing their thoughts, emotions, facts, ideas—because they know that, if these can only be articulated, perhaps they will find a buyer on the open market. This would produce a human landscape worse even than the current neoliberal subjectivity. I think there are only three options. We can keep these things as they are, with Google and Facebook centralizing everything and collecting all the data, on the grounds that they have the best algorithms and generate the best predictions, and so on. We can change the status of data to let citizens own and sell them. Or citizens can own their own data but not sell them, to enable a more communal planning of their lives. That’s the option I prefer.

      Very well thought out. Obviously must know about read write web, TSL certificate issues etc. But what does neoliberal subjectivity mean? An interesting phrase.

    1. Teachers can save digital content to the built-in storage and up to 50 students at a time can connect to the Access Point to download or access documents, videos, or other files on their own devices even if there’s no internet signal.

      CouchDB replication anyone?