39 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. INVEST

      According to this checklist, a User Story should be:

      Indepedent (of all others)

      Negociable (not a specific contract for features)

      Valuable (or vertical)

      Estimable (to a good approximation)

      Small (so as to fit within an iteration)

      Testable (in principle, even if there isn't a test for it yet)

      Source(s):

      1. Glossary: INVEST - Agile Alliance
      2. INVEST at XP 1-2-3 by Bill Wake
  2. Jan 2019
    1. "A story should be seen as a battle," and went on abbut strategies, attacks, victory, etc.) Conflict, competition, stress, struggle,

      A story can be used as a rhetorical weapon.

    2. The skillful hunters then would come staggering back with a load of meat, a lot of ivory, and a story.

      This makes me think of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's TED Talk: "The danger of a single story." Rather than solely focusing on the single story aspect, Adichie delves into the topic of storytelling and the subsequent power associated with it. In this sense, the discussion of power alludes to Foucault's extensive work on power.

      https://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story/transcript?language=en

  3. Jul 2018
  4. Nov 2017
    1. „Gość Niedzielny": „Młodzi ludzie nie kryją, że noszenie patriotycznych ciuchów jest z ich strony formą manifestacji poglądów, wręcz swoistym wyznaniem wiary".On Interia: „Rośnie zainteresowanie odzieżą z symboliką patriotyczną. Noszą ją ludzie na ulicach, biegacze w parkach czy celebryci. To już nie jest chwilowa moda".„Polska The Times Plus": „Jedni mówią przy tej okazji o renesansie patriotyzmu, inni o modzie bardzo powierzchownej, bo istotą patriotyzmu jest wnętrze człowieka".

      2017.11 RZ "Red is bed"

  5. Mar 2017
    1. I want to us to have all sorts of biographies, all sorts of photos of unknown urchins with whom we may connect.

      personal research local

      difficulty of frame - of readability - of length

    1. I never regret the eleven months which hardened my resolve, to go beyond 98 'Nos' to get to the precious, unexpected 'Yes's'. I was nobody, I was selling nothing, I could be nobody selling anything.

      Numbers

      Statistics

      Alienation

    2. I realized that what sold was not the script but the connection of excitement, the acceleration of a heart beat, the comic tone, the sudden absurd eruption in the life of another.

      Facts count for nothing.

      Excitement. - Career? Power? Attachment? Identification? Meaning? Numbers?

    3. The people on the other end were targets. They were nothing. They were nobody.

      Alienation.

      Targets.

      Capitalism

    1. With only an hour face-to-face meeting with my friend Claude Tregoat we set up connections for 500 students in a project which would become to be known as CLAVIER.

      Taking the risk to be open.

      Feeling of being uncomfortable when first confronted with explaining a potential project - that reminds me of conversations with Maritta and Leena.

  6. Jan 2017
    1. Many people implicitly or explicitly use this cognitive outsourcing model to think about augmentation. It's commonly used in press accounts, for instance. It is also, I believe, a common way for programmers to think about augmentation. In this essay, we've seen a different way of thinking about augmentation. Rather than just solving problems expressed in terms we already understand, the goal is to change the thoughts we can think:

      Good distinctions here. Cf. also what happens when one begins to master the heptapod language in "Story of Your Life." It's Whorf-Sapir, but a "soft" Whorf-Sapir. So I'd say, anyhow. Relevant too that Engelbart discusses Whorf-Sapir.

  7. Nov 2016
  8. Sep 2016
    1. It's like getting really drunk at a party and spilling your guts in front of everyone and feeling incredibly great and cathartic about it, and then waking up the next morning and realizing what a complete fool you made of yourself."
    1. Are the Killjoys the heroes? If you want to look at it in a nihilistic 15-year-old point of view, watching A Clockwork Orange for the first time, I guess you could see them as the heroes. Are Better Living Industries (BLI) really the bad guys? Who’s the bad guy? I feel like The Girl just wants to hang out with her cat.
    1. The goal of ethnography, as Malinowski put it, is “to grasp the native’s point of view, his relation to life, to realize his vision of his world.”

      Not to just study the culture, to study from within the culture. (English lit, one story) Ethnographers look past culture's "one story" to live in people's individual stories

    1. There will be a · 1 · · · h I ·11 d gtr s1ttmg opposite me w 0 w1 won er why I have not been flirt-ing with her

      This is our first indication throughout the book that David views women differently than the average man. We don't yet know the real reason why, especially since he then refers to "his" Hella. According to Juliet Gardiner, Baldwin's implication here is consistent with the wold wide view of women in the 50's. They were expected to be perfect wives and mothers, and often flirted with and arguably viewed as an object of entertainment.

  9. Aug 2016
    1. I wanted to record civil breakdown by degrees ... it's not all at once, it's not, you flip a switch and suddenly people are dog-eat-dog and regard everything in a Darwinian, animalistic way. I think that it starts subtly ... you walk into a restaurant and the maitre d' does not see you to your table, but just waves at it. Or doormen no longer carry groceries for the elderly. It's that little.
  10. Jul 2016
    1. Fuck You, I'm Stealing Home: A baseball themed band that toured the coast playing primarily basements and selling matchbooks with our name on them. The oddity of the theme alone helped move some serious units.
    2. Aftermath: My first band when I was 12, named after the fourth Rolling Stones' (our biggest and practically only influence) album (Aftermath), and also because we rehearsed after math (well, school).
    3. New York City Rhythm: Just straight up ripped off the title of a Barry Manilow song. At this point I was starting to become proud of the fact that I had no shame in admitting I liked what some might refer to as the more shameful side of AM Gold. 
  11. Jun 2016
    1. “The time we were opened to that world is when we talk to other bands. People who are great people, amazing musicians. Then they release a new song, and I’m like, ‘That’s not them. I’ve been on tour with them for months, that’s something they would not do. That’s where we’ve seen it the most, honestly.” When it is suggested those artists drank the Kool-Aid, Joseph adjusts the metaphor, replacing “drank” with “served.” “They weren’t given a choice. They were painted into a situation where they were going to get shelved or a plug was going to get pulled, by people in control who think they know [what works].”
    1. For the sixteen-track album, the band invented fifteen fictional personas, each with its own sound, aesthetic, and backstory that draw from different decades of club culture. Genres range from Studio 1 reggae to indie rock, under pseudonyms like Burning Phlegm, White Virgins, and Noah's Dark.
    1. But even if being in PUP sounds like a living nightmare for Babcock, it’s all he’s got. Gig or no gig, he’s waking up most mornings on the floor with more apologies than dollars in the bank, coming to the same conclusion over and over again: that voice in my head telling me I’m a loser was right all along.
  12. Feb 2016
    1. I instantly knew it was something I wanted to do

      I love your story and want you to continue to sharpen it. I think it speaks volumes. Explaining what you felt in this moment, what appealed to you, how it shaped your vision might take this story one step closer to really helping your reader get a sense of your motivations from this moment.

    1. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.

      A third grade student should be able to refer to different parts of a text by using specific vocabulary such as "chapter" or "stanza" to identify key details in the text.

      Parts of a Story

      A good example of this would be chapters books for third graders such as books from the Junie B. Jones series. These allow students to recall details from the text by referring to specific chapters of sections of the book.

  13. Nov 2015
    1. In one version of this experiment, if we gave participants synthetic oxytocin (in the nose, that will reach the brain in an hour), they donated to 57 percent more of the featured charities and donated 56 percent more money than participants given a placebo. Those who received oxytocin also reported more emotional transportation into the world depicted in the ad. Most importantly, these people said they were less likely to engage in the dangerous behaviors shown in the ads. So, go see a movie and laugh and cry. It’s good for your brain, and just might motivate you to make positive changes in your life and in others’ lives as well.
    2. Once a story has sustained our attention long enough, we may begin to emotionally resonate with story’s characters. Narratologists call this “transportation,” and you experience this when your palms sweat as James Bond trades blows with a villain on top of a speeding train.
    3. Any Hollywood writer will tell you that attention is a scarce resource. Movies, TV shows, and books always include “hooks” that make you turn the page, stay on the channel through the commercial, or keep you in a theater seat. Scientists liken attention to a spotlight. We are only able to shine it on a narrow area. If that area seems less interesting than some other area, our attention wanders.
    4. This evidence supports the view of some narrative theorists that there is a universal story structure. These scholars claim every engaging story has this structure, called the dramatic arc. It starts with something new and surprising, and increases tension with difficulties that the characters must overcome, often because of some failure or crisis in their past, and then leads to a climax where the characters must look deep inside themselves to overcome the looming crisis, and once this transformation occurs, the story resolves itself. 
  14. Oct 2015
  15. Aug 2015
    1. Seneca Creation Story

      This Seneca story was recorded by Jeremiah Curtin, a white man fluent in the Seneca language. In 1883, 1886, and 1887, Curtin spent many hours talking with Seneca men and women on the Cattaraugus reservation in New York state. The largest of the five tribes of the Iroquois confederacy, the Seneca had inhabited much of central New York in the sixteenth century, but by the mid-seventeenth century they had moved west to Lake Erie and south into Pennsylvania. Curtin recorded this tale in the Seneca language, and it was subsequently translated into English by I. W. B. Hewitt. Source: Jeremiah Curtin and I. W. B. Hewitt, “Seneca Fiction, Legends and Myths, Part 1,” Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology 32 (1910–11 [1918])

      I would like you to read it as an origin story. That is, think about it as it explains the creation of humanity.

      What is the relationship between humanity and nature? What structure do you think society will take based on this origin story? These are questions I want you to think about and seek the answers to while you do this reading

    1. The First Book of Moses, Called Genesis

      This is the first chapter of Genesis from the King James version of the Bible. While I realize that this is clearly a religious text, I would like you to read it as an origin story. That is, think about it as it explains the creation of humanity.

      What is the relationship between humanity and nature? What structure do you think society will take based on this origin story? Who authorizes this text? Why? These are questions I want you to think about and seek the answers to while you do this reading

    1. As soon as computer data entry moved from punch-cards to online files (in the mid/late 1960s) there were "commands" for accomplishing this operation.
  16. Jan 2015
    1. But if you turn data into a money-printing machine for citizens, whereby we all become entrepreneurs, that will extend the financialization of everyday life to the most extreme level, driving people to obsess about monetizing their thoughts, emotions, facts, ideas—because they know that, if these can only be articulated, perhaps they will find a buyer on the open market. This would produce a human landscape worse even than the current neoliberal subjectivity. I think there are only three options. We can keep these things as they are, with Google and Facebook centralizing everything and collecting all the data, on the grounds that they have the best algorithms and generate the best predictions, and so on. We can change the status of data to let citizens own and sell them. Or citizens can own their own data but not sell them, to enable a more communal planning of their lives. That’s the option I prefer.

      Very well thought out. Obviously must know about read write web, TSL certificate issues etc. But what does neoliberal subjectivity mean? An interesting phrase.

    1. Teachers can save digital content to the built-in storage and up to 50 students at a time can connect to the Access Point to download or access documents, videos, or other files on their own devices even if there’s no internet signal.

      CouchDB replication anyone?