24 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2021
    1. I really like the ideas in this game: the theme, what it's trying to accomplish (explore the problems with imperialism, if I understood correctly), the game board, the game in general. I want to like it.

      but, I don't think I would like this one enough due to the luck and relying on other players' whims (trading) mechanisms:

      • Dice Rolling
      • Push Your Luck

      You can risk a lot getting an expensive estate, but if you push your luck too much, your risk/gamble won't pay off and you'll permanently lose that [pawn] and those victory points.

    1. John Company offers players a new understanding of British history in the eighteenth and nineteenth century that reflects contemporary scholarship on the subject and extensive research into primary documents. John Company attempts to put the critical events of that time in their proper context and show how the imperial experience transformed the domestic culture of Britain. The East India Company lurked behind every building of a textile mill and every bit of wealth in a Jane Austen novel.  John Company is an uncompromising portrait of the people who made the Company and the British Empire what it was. It is as frank as it is cutting in its satire.  Accordingly, the game wrestles with many of the key themes of imperialism and globalization in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and how those developments were felt domestically. As such, this game might not be suitable for all players. Please make sure everyone in your group consents to this exploration before playing. 
    1. Unfortunately, there is some urgency to this effort. As Shashi Tharoor writes in his book Inglorious Empire (2018), over the past 30 years, there has been a tremendous bout of collective amnesia, espeically in the UK, about the history of empire and its consequences. Into this vacuum, revisionist historians of the worst kind like Niall Ferguson have capitalized on historical blind spots of people living today to make an absurd case for the benefits of empire. This cannot be allowed to happen. Tharoor believes that one of the best bulwarks against this erasure is to do the work of inquiry and to make the history of empire accessible and apparent to the widest audience. It is into this effort that I submit my work. John Company is an unsparing portrait that hopefully will give its players a sense of the nature of empire and the long half-life of its cultural production. It is certainly not the only way to make a game about empire, but I hope that it does its part in adding to our understanding of that subject and its continued legacy.
    1. Around &Bigger the box is bigger: 75mm high instead of 45mm or so.That was the main reason for the name &Bigger. The first edition does fit in its box but very tight. Because the first factory used bigger cardboard than planned. They told me about this "upgrade" after they produced the game. The thicker tiles (about 2.5mm) did feel good for the game so the &Bigger edition has the same
    1. However, it can be extremely frustrating placing the tiles. Very commonly there will be no position to place a tile in and it will be put to one side. Perhaps someone new to tile-laying games wouldn't find this so odd, but to anyone with experience of Carcassonne it will seem very limiting. In Carcassonne you can pretty much always place a tile, with several choices of position available. Every player I've introduced this game to has looked at me as if to say, "We must be doing something wrong." But no, that game is designed that way. Sometimes it feels like the map builds itself - there is often only one viable placement, so it starts to feel like a jigsaw, searching for that available position. Surely placing a single tile shouldn't be this difficult!

      I don't think I'd find it frustrating. I think I would enjoy the puzzle part of it.

      But indirectly I see that difficulty in placing tiles impacting my enjoyment: because it means that there are no/few meaningful decisions to be had in terms of where to place your tile (because there's often only 1 place you can put it, and it may sometimes benefit your opponent more than yourself) or which tile to place (because you don't get any choice -- unless you can't play the first one, and then you can play a previously unplayable one or draw blind).

    1. As the project goes along, I’ll be posting some blogs about my design process and thinking around the game, and if you’re interested in my writing about games, I have written for both Meeple Mountain and Dicebreaker.
    1. Reminds me ofo DVONN, but only with respect to disappearing hexes/spaces. DVONN is a much much better (actually strategic) game.

    1. Academy Games has always prided itself in the quality of its rules. Most of our rules are taught in stages, allowing you to start playing as soon as possible without needing to read everything. We are very careful about the order we teach rules and rely heavily on graphics and pictures to facilitate understanding. We also include a large number of detailed picture examples, often with 3D renders, that help you understand the context of the rules.
    2. We also include a large number of detailed picture examples, often with 3D renders, that help you understand the context of the rules. For these reason, we generally don't start laying out the final rulebook until production art is complete. Writing and laying out a 20 page rule book like this generally takes about 3 months from start to finish, usually requiring a complete rewrite or two, and involves dozens of editors.
    3. We use an online editing program called ProofHQ, where you and our development team will review the rules, discuss ideas, and add comments and suggestions, so that these rules are of the same high quality as our other game rules. We have used this process for years, because integrating outside eyes and ears is an invaluable asset.

      having more eyes is better

  2. Mar 2021
    1. Shogi is a classic game. I know many people who want to play Shogi, but the Kanji on the pieces makes it too hard to master. I have designed this Shogi with icons so anybody can learn it easily.
  3. Feb 2021
  4. Nov 2020
  5. Nov 2019
    1. Since games typically have perfect information, the outcome of the game is completely driven by the actions of the players.
  6. Feb 2017