4 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. let:hovering={active}

      It seems like it should be the other way around:

      let:active={hovering}
      

      to make it look like a regular let assignment.

      It's only when you consider what/how let:hovering on its own means/works that it makes a bit more sense that it is the way it is. When it's on its own, it's a little clearer that it's saying to "make use of" an available slot prop having the given name. (Very much like bind, where the LHS is also the name of the prop we're getting the data from.) Obviously we have to identify which prop we're wanting to use/pull data from, so that seems like the most essential/main/only thing the name could be referring to. (Of course, as a shortcut (in this shorthand version), and for consistency, it also names the local variable with the same name, but it wouldn't have to.)

      Another even simpler way to remember / look at it:

      1. Everything on the left hand of an prop/attribute [arg] corresponds to something in the component/element that you're passing the [arg] to. Usually it's a prop that you're passing in, but in this case (and in the case of bind:) it's more like a prop that you're pulling out of that component, and attaching to. Either way, the name on the LHS always corresponds to an export let inside that named component.
      2. Everything on the right side corresponds to a name/variable in the local scope. Usually it passes the value of that variable, but in the case of a let: or bind: it actually "passes the variable by reference" (not the value) and associates that local variable with the LHS (the "remote" side).

      Another example is bind: You're actually binding the RHS to the value of the exported prop named on the LHS, but when you read it (until you get used to it?) it can look like it's saying bind a variable named LHS to the prop on the RHS.

  2. Jul 2020
    1. The meta charset information must also be the first child of the <head> tag. The reason this tag must be first is to avoid re-interpreting content that was added before the meta charset tag.

      But what if another tag also specified that it had to be the first child "because ..."? Maybe that hasn't happened yet, but it could and then you'd have to decide which one truly was more important to put first? (Hopefully/probably it wouldn't even matter that much.)

  3. May 2020