167 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Thus, the New York Public Library has CATNYP.There is BEARCAT (Kutztown University) and ALLECAT (Allegheny) andBOBCAT (NYU’s Bobst Library) and CATS (Cambridge). There is VIRGO(the University of Virginia), FRANCIS (Williams College), LUCY(Skidmore), CLIO (Columbia), CHESTER (the University of Rochester),SHERLOCK (Bualo State College), ARLO (the University of Colorado atColorado Springs), FRANKLIN (the University of Pennsylvania), andHarvard’s appropriately Eustace Tilleyish HOLLIS. There is BISON(SUNY Bualo), OASIS (the University of Iowa), ORION (UCLA),SOCRATES (Stanford), ILIAD (Butler), EUCLIDPLUS (Case Western), LUMINA(the University of Minnesota), and THE CONNELLY EXPLORER (La Salle).MELVYL (the University of California system) is named after MelvilDewey; the misspelling was reportedly intentional, meant toemphasize the dierence between Dewey’s cataloging universe andour own.

      List of names for computerized library card catalogs at various libraries.

  2. Feb 2024
    1. Okay folks. I think I better name my antinet before he gets too big and people start getting suspicious. After some thinking and googling words I don't know in order to make an acronym I think I've decided on "J.A.K.O.B". Which stands for "just a knowledgeable omnilegent box". Omnilegent apparently means reading or having read everything. The name is of course inspired by J.A.R.V.I.S (just a very intelligent system) the artificial intelligence created by Tony Stark.

      u/tylermangelson named his zettelkasten J.A.K.O.B.

      https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/1aecx27/naming_my_baby_antinet/

  3. Jan 2024
  4. Aug 2023
    1. Zettelkasten in one or several language(s)? .t3_15wo3f2._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postBodyLink-VisitedLinkColor: #989898; }

      As long as you know and understand what you're writing, use as many languages as you or your zettelkasten wants or needs.

      I'm often working with ideas from other languages and cultures which have no direct translations into English, so I use those native words interspersed with English. Sometimes I don't have words in any language and make up a shorthand phrase in English until I can come up with a better word. Often I'll collect examples of the same "foreign" words in multiple contexts to tease out their contextual meanings as was comprehensively done with large group zettelkasten like the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae and the Wörterbuch der ägyptischen Sprache. I also frequently use mathematical symbols, equations, and other scientific notations, graphs, drawings, color, etc. to make my meanings clear.

      I've also worked with historical figures who have had names in multiple languages over the centuries and cross index them in a variety of different languages based on context. As an example, I've got at least 11 different variations of names for Ramon Llull in almost as many languages and variations of transliterations. I try to keep each one in its original context, but link them in my index.

      There are certainly zettelkasten out there written in four and more languages as suited the needs of their users. S.D. Goitein certainly used Hebrew, English, German, Arabic, Aramaic in his and may have likely had other languages (Yiddish, Coptic, Egyptian?) interspersed to lesser extents. Adolph Erman certainly used Egyptian hieroglyphs along with German in his. It can easily be argued that their zettelkasten and work required multiple languages.

      https://web.archive.org/web/20180627163317im_/https://aaew.bbaw.de/wbhome/Broschuere/abb08.jpg A example zettelkasten slip showing a passage of text from the victory stele of Sesostris III at the Nubian fortress of Semna. The handwriting is that of Adolf Erman, who had "already struggled with the text as a high school student".

      At the end of the day, they're your notes, so write them as you like.

    1. It may seem like Testing is some sort of beta, unstable version but that’s not entirely true. Debian Testing is the next Debian stable version. The actual development branch is the Debian Unstable (also known as Sid). Debian Testing lies somewhere in between the unstable and stable branch where it gets the new features before the stable release.
  5. Jun 2023
  6. May 2023
    1. https://www.reddit.com/r/antinet/comments/13tv9ls/question_how_fast_did_you_name_your_antinet/

      Mine was a bit into the process, but not until I got the filing cabinet where they'll all ultimately live: https://boffosocko.com/2022/08/08/55808119/#Naming

      See examples of people naming them here including: - Cvrie (Fallout 4 reference) - torspedia (after username on MediaWiki installation) - Todd (Bad Words reference to study binder) - Plumeria (after 4 months) - Hamilton after video - Epictetus (meaning "to acquire" from stoicism) - Zeke (short for Ezekiel) - Stewie (personal communication, Scheper's nickname, not mentioned on this page)

    1. But I wouldn't call them a ZK® (stealing Andy's shorthand!) but they were a box of notes (Zettelkasten?).
    2. It is unfortunate that the German word for a box of notes is the same as the methodology surrounding Luhmann.

      reply to dandennison84 at https://forum.zettelkasten.de/discussion/comment/17921/#Comment_17921

      I've written a bit before on The Two Definitions of Zettelkasten, the latter of which has been emerging since roughly 2013 in English language contexts. Some of it is similar to or extends @dandennison84's framing along with some additional history.

      Because of the richness of prior annotation and note taking traditions, for those who might mean what we're jokingly calling ZK®, I typically refer to that practice specifically as a "Luhmann-esque zettelkasten", though it might be far more appropriate to name them a (Melvil) "Dewey Zettelkasten" because the underlying idea which makes Luhmann's specific zettelkasten unique is that he was numbering his ideas and filing them next to similar ideas. Luhmann was treating ideas on cards the way Dewey had treated and classified books about 76 years earlier. Luhmann fortunately didn't need to have a standardized set of numbers the way the Mundaneum had with the Universal Decimal Classification system, because his was personal/private and not shared.

      To be clear, I'm presently unaware that Dewey had or kept any specific sort of note taking system, card-based or otherwise. I would suspect, given his context, that if we were to dig into that history, we would find something closer to a Locke-inspired indexed commonplace book, though he may have switched later in life as his Library Bureau came to greater prominence and dominance.

      Some of the value of the Dewey-Luhmann note taking system stems from the same sorts of serendipity one discovers while flipping through ideas that one finds in searching for books on library shelves. You may find the specific book you were looking for, but you're also liable to find some interesting things to read on the shelves around that book or even on a shelf you pass on the way to find your book.

      Perhaps naming it and referring to it as the Dewey-Luhmann note taking system or the Dewey-Luhmann Zettelkasten may help to better ground and/or demystify the specific practices? Co-crediting them for the root idea and an early actual practice, respectively, provides a better framing and understanding, especially for native English speakers who don't have the linguistic context for understanding Zettelkästen on its own. Such a moniker would help to better delineate the expected practices and shape of a note taking practice which could be differentiated from other very similar ones which provide somewhat different affordances.

      Of course, as the history of naming scientific principles and mathematical theorems after people shows us, as soon as such a surname label might catch on, we'll assuredly discover someone earlier in the timeline who had mastered these principles long before (eg: the "Gessner Zettelkasten" anyone?) Caveat emptor.

    1. MyServiceController

      I'm not sure the Controller suffix makes sense to me here. Just MyService would be best, but we want that name for the exported constant. Maybe MyServiceClass would be tolerable since it isn't exported.

  7. Mar 2023
    1. Finding good names is quite difficult. Single words are also almost always better than combined names, even though one is a bit limited with single words alone. There are exceptions though. For example .each_with_index or .each_index are good names, IMO.
    1. So let’s get right to it, here’s what you need to know. Despise the spaces Avoid the underscores Embrace the dashes

  8. Feb 2023
    1. The ID suffix was added because I use external tools to add notes to my vault so I needed a means to ensure there would never be a collision. For example, Alfred. If I accidentally typed the name of a note that already exists into it I didn’t want it to accidentally overwrite an existing note,

      Example of someone ("davecan") with a specific reason for using unique identifiers in the titles for their digital note taking.

  9. Jan 2023
    1. The Compass of Zettelkasten Thinking.

      Notice the naming/productization of this idea: The Compass of Zettelkasten Thinking which Fei-Ling Tseng labels a "method" in the following line.

      The comments on the piece seem to underline this.

      The general idea is also far from new, so people are obviously ignoring the history of the space as they productize it.

    1. CamelCase is a way to separate the words in a phrase by making the first letter of each word capitalized and not using spaces

      Camel Case is a method to avoid spaces in names. For example UpperCamelCase and lowerCamelCase

      All PascalCase styles are CamelCase but not all CamelCase are PascalCase

  10. Dec 2022
    1. For those who can hear. When you name you divide. There is zero biblical precedent for naming a certain group of believers .... Identify with the body of Christ in your area .... We are exhorted to, "let there be no division among you".The only use of "churches" plural in scripture refers to the church in different locations. There was no such thought of "churches" within one locality. Love you all and pray more will see this so the world may see we are one and know that Jesus was sent by the Father.It's important John 17:20-23
    2. no need any name whatsoever bro It's who we are that's important.
    3. Often it helps to have the location or region in the name, a mountain near you or the name of the valley you are in, or a creek, stream or river. What says 'home' about where you are?
    4. Pleeaasse don't give "it" a name.There is no "it". You believers are part of the church in your location and you meet together.There is zero biblical precedent for a group of believers giving their particular group a name.I understand that nearly all believers do .... That in no way makes it right.Names seperate us from others of the church in our area.
    5. Paul TrosclairHow is it biblical to name a church ?2wBeth BalmesPaul Trosclair geographical. E.g.Church in Corinth. Church in Ephesus.2wJohanna WhittakerBeth Balmes .. Paul's letters were to the CHURCHES (ekklesia) in ...
  11. Nov 2022
    1. The lowest strata represents Generative ambiguity. Here, words are used as symbols for ideas that are very hard to express; an individual gives a name to a nebulous collection of ideas or thoughts. They struggle to make this approach make sense to others.

      Generative ambiguity is the process of giving names, potentially tentative, to a nebulous collection of nascent and unclear ideas in an effort to help make sense of them both to themselves as well as others.

  12. Oct 2022
    1. It acts as a black hole null object, allowing arbitrarily deep method chains.

      If that's what it does, then perhaps the name should reflect that in the name!

    2. For any message that has not explicitly allowed or expected, the double will return itself.

      If that's what it does, then perhaps the name should reflect that in the name!

    3. to make the double "loose"

      If that's what it does, then perhaps the name should reflect that in the name!

  13. Sep 2022
  14. Aug 2022
    1. Title for My Book

      It's tough to do your own marketing and naming is hard. If you have an obscure short title, be sure to have a sharply defined subtitle, both for definition but to hit the keywords you'll want for discovery and search (SEO) purposes. Though be careful with keyword stuffing, if for no other reason than that Luhmann had a particularly sparse index.

      Zettelkasten doesn't have much value for for native search (yet). Who besides a student that doesn't really want to buy it searches for a book on note taking?! Creativity, Productivity, and Writing are probably most of your potential market, so look at books in those areas for words to borrow (aka steal flagrantly). Other less common keywords to consider or throw into your description of the book, though not the title: research, research methods, literature review, thesis writing, Ph.D., etc.

      Perhaps you've limited the question Scott. Instead ask everyone: What title would you want to see on such a book that would make you want to buy and read it? Everyone should brainstorm for 3 minutes and write down a few potential titles.

      I'll start:

      Antinet Method: Thought Development for Creativity and Productive Writing

      Antinet Zettelkasten: A Modern Approach to Thought Development

      Antinet: The Technique of Unreasonably Productive Intellectual Work (and Fun) [h/t F. Kuntze]

      Mix and match away...

  15. Jul 2022
    1. OpenBooks is a hub for Neocities community projects.

      Why the name, though?

    1. Protagonist Does a Thing formula

      https://slate.com/culture/2022/06/book-titles-eleanor-oliphant-women-fiction.html

      This article has a nice number of examples of the naming convention: "Protagonist Does a Thing"


      I am a bit shocked to see Hypothes.is indicates that there are 31 (private) annotations on this particular page. What is going on here?!

  16. Jun 2022
    1. Are there relevant IPs buried in other projects you’ve worked onin the past?

      Sadly, I've already forgotten his self-defined version of IP and I can only think of intellectual property. Is footnote mention linking it to intellectual property certainly didn't help things.

      This is part of why using popular acronyms that aren't descriptive or clever is a bad naming practice.

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  17. May 2022
  18. Mar 2022
  19. Feb 2022
    1. Is the name "delegated type" up for review? I don't see any delegation happening in the code. It looks more like a "subtype", or "secondary type", or something like that.
    1. Unfortunately, I think a lot of the answers here are perpetuating or advancing the idea that there's some complex, meaningful difference. Really - there isn't all that much to it, just different words for the same thing.
    2. 'method' is the object-oriented word for 'function'. That's pretty much all there is to it (ie., no real difference).
  20. Nov 2021
    1. It might be confusing that a union of types appears to have the intersection of those types’ properties.
  21. Oct 2021
    1. serverFetch name is unclear. That the docs need to say in bold that it's external is a bit of a code smell.
    2. Rename to externalFetch. That it runs on the server is already implied by it being located in hooks
  22. Sep 2021
    1. I feel like app/packs (or something like it) is a good name because it communicates to developers that it's not just JavaScript that can be bundled, it's also CSS, images, SVGs — you name it. I realize what can be bundled is wholly dependent on the bundler you use, but even esbuild supports bundling CSS. So couldn't this possibly be confusing?
  23. Aug 2021
    1. arguments = method_proc.parameters.map(&:last)

      Gets names of parameters, like [:arg_a, :b]

      Should be called parameter_names (the key word being names). "arguments" implies that it is the actual values that were passed in — not the name of the variables to which they will be assigned.

  24. Jul 2021
    1. World Health Organization (WHO). (2021, May 31). Today WHO has announced a new naming system for key #COVID19 variants. The labels are based on the Greek alphabet (i.e. Alpha, Beta, Gamma, etc), making them simple, easy to say and remember. 👉 https://t.co/aYCZfspZyb https://t.co/Gxt14fwVqF [Tweet]. @WHO. https://twitter.com/WHO/status/1399432092333883393

  25. Jun 2021
    1. I worked in the word "Mancunian" three times in one short paragraph. It was the second-best demonym r d ever heard, almost match-ing Vallisoletano (a citizen ofVallado-lid).

      For those who'd like to go crazy on demonyms... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demonym

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  26. May 2021
    1. die-hard fans of filter-branch may be interested in filter-lamely (a.k.a. filter-branch-ish), a reimplementation of filter-branch based on filter-repo which is more performant
    1. 1. The main folder names have numbers in front of them, such as 0-base to ensure that the folders stay in that particular order. You can certainly omit this or choose different folder names.
  27. Apr 2021
    1. For those who are wondering about the name, Bear Raid is a real phrase used to describe when a stock price is intentionally lowered through short selling and rumors.
    1. https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/183284/factory-funner/versions

      And now there are two versions with the nickname "Second edition": 2018 https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgameversion/404596/second-edition 2021 https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgameversion/556765/second-edition

      and a 3rd edition published prior to the current/new 2nd edition: 2019 https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgameversion/486693/third-edition

      Confusing all around.

      But I think the bottom line is that the 2021 version is in fact the same game and the newest rules tweaks:

      1. Added a sixth player
      2. Official variant to play without the quick grab element.
    2. Around &Bigger the box is bigger: 75mm high instead of 45mm or so.That was the main reason for the name &Bigger. The first edition does fit in its box but very tight. Because the first factory used bigger cardboard than planned. They told me about this "upgrade" after they produced the game. The thicker tiles (about 2.5mm) did feel good for the game so the &Bigger edition has the same
  28. Mar 2021
    1. antimicro is a graphical program used to map keyboard keys and mouse controls to a gamepad.

      why is it named this?

    1. Ubuntu Multipass name generator

      • One word: names.txt
      • Two words: adjectives.txt - names.txt
      • Three words: adverbs.txt + adjectives.txt + names.txt
    1. The absence of a method name here is per design: this object does only one thing, and hence what it does is reflected in the class name.
  29. Feb 2021
    1. As we know, naming is hard.
    2. Another thing I don’t like is the name of the config file manifest.js. Internally Sprockets has the concept of a manifest already Sprockets::Manifest, but the two aren’t directly coupled. We also already have a “manifest” JSON file that gets generated in public/assets/ and has manifest in the name .Sprockets-manifest-140998229eec5a9a5802b31d0ef6ed25.json. I know one is a JS file and one is a JSON file, but it’s a bit confusing to talk about.

      When I first heard of app/assets/config/manifest.js, I was a bit confused too, and assumed/wondered if it was related to the manifest it generates under public.

    3. The link name is not very helpful, it doesn’t explain what it does very well.
    1. There are two definitions of ‘Enterprise’ 1 - Enterprise as a business. In fact, in French, ‘enterprise’ literally means ‘business’ 2- Enterprise as a large business. This is the most common use of the term in business, differentiating between small, medium, and large businesses. In this context, there is no official rule, however it is generally accepted for enterprise to mean companies with over 1,000 employees and/or $1B in revenue
    1. outcome.valid?

      This would read better if it were aliased as success?:

      if outcome.success?
      
    2. value returned from #execute

      Why not follow Ruby Proc convention of calling it call?

      execute seems like a synonym for call, so given these 2 equivalent options, it seems better to prefer the one more idiomatic in Ruby.

    3. By convention, we call this an outcome
    4. Call .run on your interaction to execute it.

      Why not follow Ruby Proc convention of calling it call?

      run seems like a synonym for call, so given these 2 equivalent options, it seems better to prefer the one more idiomatic in Ruby.

    1. if you name you instance variable form, then you can always just pass in params[:form]
    2. Why process, not save? This is entirely up to you. However, it's good to stay consistent across your team so there's no confusion. I began using save but found there are some cases for forms where you aren't saving anything, such as when you are just triggering a job or push-notification. I found using process fits more cases so that's what I use. This is also typically the only method that is public on my forms.

      process is a good name, but I think this is evidence that this object is not the form object itself, but a form processor (as I like to call it) or a "workflow" object (like https://github.com/gogogarrett/reform_example/blob/master/app/forms/workflows/user_workflow.rb), which wraps a form object.

    1. @conference_form.submit(conference_params)

      Surprised they called it submit, since that could imply that you're triggering an action called submit.

      They use other verbs to describe this:

      • sync
      • populate
      • write

      Analogous to Reform's sync / sync_models method.

      Actually, the name makes a lot of sense when you see it in context:

          @conference_form = ConferenceForm.new(conference)
          @conference_form.submit(conference_params)
      
          if @conference_form.save
      
    1. Unlike naming children, coding involves naming things on a daily basis. When you write code, naming things isn’t just hard, it’s a relentless demand for creativity. Fortunately, programmers are creative people.
    2. If we renamed things more often, then it probably wouldn’t be so hard to name them in the first place.
    3. We also find it hard to agree on what good names and bad names look like, which makes it hard to know when renaming improves a name.
    4. This is funny because it’s unexpected. Cache invalidation sounds like a hard thing, while naming sounds more straightforward. The joke works because it violates our expectation that hard things should be technical. It’s also funny because it’s true.
    5. First of all, we want names to exhibit truth and beauty: to be the right names, and to make our code clean and beautiful. At least, this is what we want to think about our code, but naming’s importance is far more practical.
    6. Naming is communication
    7. Naming matters for both idealogical and practical reasons.
    8. Naming is just one part of the micro-design activity that we call programming. If design weren’t hard, we wouldn’t find good design so satisfying.
    9. Anyone who has ever tried to name a child knows that naming is hard. Naming things in code is harder. It’s bad enough that you have to commit to a name that someone isn’t going to like. You also have to be able to live with it.
    1. There’s only one hard thing in Computer Science: human communication. The most complex part of cache invalidation is figuring out what the heck people mean with the word cache. Once you get that sorted out, the rest is not that complicated; the tools are out there, and they’re pretty good.
    1. When you use this syntax the lines on either end of the areas are actually getting named automatically.
    2. Notice that you’re not naming lines with this syntax, just areas.
  30. Dec 2020
    1. Maybe something more neutral just meaning a virtual element / no-element container would better express the intention? And regarding the syntax, maybe it would also feel less repetitive / boilerplaty than <svelte:slot slot="name" />... Maybe something like <svelte:fragment slot="name"> or <svelte:virtual slot="name">?
    2. Also agree that <svelte:slot> is perhaps a little confusing since it replaces the slot attribute rather than the slot element, so <svelte:fragment> would make more sense
  31. Nov 2020
    1. The Object.getPrototypeOf() method returns the prototype (i.e. the value of the internal [[Prototype]] property) of the specified object.

      internal: [[Prototype]]

      Other times we see something used to indicate it is internal. In fact, this even supersedes proto__. So why did they use a different naming convention? Did they decide [[ ]] is a better naming convention?

    1. Microsoft announced IronRuby, which uses the same name as Wilco Bauwer's IronRuby project with permission.
  32. Oct 2020
    1. In a browser, deep-diff defines a global variable DeepDiff. If there is a conflict in the global namespace you can restore the conflicting definition and assign deep-diff to another variable like this: var deep = DeepDiff.noConflict();.
    1. I vote for calling it let Could be used like this {#let foo = initialValue}. It's closer to javascript
    2. I expressed doubts about the name with because of its existing meaning in javascript, which is a fair point from my past self.
    1. The other module on npm that I found to do this

      Too bad https://www.npmjs.org/package/is-plain-object was taken and this library had to resort to is-pojo yuck acronym. is-plain-object is a much better name.

    1. their name gives no mnemonic boost whatsoever. Whatever faint associations it might once have held fade away, especially when the discover was neither famous nor narrow, and the reader is several generations removed.

      This might be debatable as many of the names in the example are relatively famous names. Any associations they provide might also extend to the dates of the mathematician which also then places the ideas historically as well.

      More often I see the problem with some of the bigger greats like Euler and Cauchy who discovered so many things and everything is named after them.

      The other problem is mis-attribution of the discovery, which happens all-too-frequently, and the thing is named after the wrong person.

    2. The worst answer I can imagine is the one Pope Gregory VII gave for refusing to let the Holy Scripture be translated out of Latin: “... [I]f it were plainly apparent to all men, perchance it would be little esteemed and be subject to disrespect; or it might be falsely understood by those of mediocre learning, and lead to error.”

      I'd push back on this a bit by saying that there are huge swaths of people looking at English translations, of Latin translations, of Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic translations. Not only is there some detail lost in the multiple levels of translation, but many modern Christians are actively mis-applying the stories in the Bible to apply to their modern lives in radically different ways than was intended.

  33. Sep 2020
    1. Why the obfuscation of remaining to r and callbacks to c? This is fine for function-local variables but in this instance makes the code significantly harder to reason about? There is no notion of what c and r mean.
    1. But I just want to say npx is lame. It should have been npm run or npm exec or something.

      They apparently don't appreciate the brevity of npx for something that you probably will run often. Would you also prefer to type out node package-manager instead of npm every time you currently type out npm??

    1. The problem I have with this approach to state and prop variables is that the difference between them is very blurry. In React you can clearly see that a prop is an input to component (because of clear function notation), and that state is something internal. In Svelte they are both just variables, with the exception that props use export keyword.

      This is something I've seen before: people noticing that Svelte is missing some kind of naming convention.

      React has use___ convention, for example. Without that, it makes it hard to see the difference between and know just from the name that a function is an (mentioned in the other article I read) action and not a event handler or even component, for example.

    1. if this does land, my vote is for smoosh
    2. For the actual name of the thing, I like behaviors more than enhancers. That might be too limiting but I can't think of using this for styles or something that I wouldn't call a behavior. traits is also nice. Hey, decorators works too.
    3. While there is some precedence in other frameworks for using as, the word doesn't fit well. Since you are adding functionality to elements I like the word add better (and it only has 1 more character).
    1. I like use. But we would still need a noun to reference them by in the docs or libraries.
    2. What do you think of one of these: "actions", "enhancements", "additions" or "extensions"? My vote goes to "actions". It is short but it has meaning, as do the others.
    3. one problem with 'behavior' is that's the terminology we use to describe all of a component's encapsulated logic — methods, transitions, etc.
    1. To differentiate <style scoped> from the existing top-level <style> elements, I propose that we refer to these as 'local scoped styles'.
    1. The above doesn't work for another unfortunate reason, it's not possible to write export let class = ''; instead CustomComponent because class is a reserved keyword and isn't allowed to be used as a variable name. The workaround would have to be to use some other prop name like maybe cssClass but then there's no "standard" by which all Svelte components can follow and every library will choose a different name which is cumbersome for users, because it creates scenarios like:
    1. It was called a "virtual DOM" library because it didn't start out as isomorphic, but actually tied to the DOM from the start. It was an afterthought to make it isomorphic.
  34. Jun 2020
    1. Is it “syncthing”, “Syncthing” or “SyncThing”?¶ It’s Syncthing, although the command and source repository is spelled syncthing so it may be referred to in that way as well. It’s definitely not SyncThing, even though the abbreviation st is used in some circumstances and file names.
  35. May 2020
    1. To follow conventions of naming across GitLab, and to further move away from the build term and toward job, some CI/CD environment variables were renamed for GitLab 9.0 release.
    1. The folks at Netlify created Netlify CMS to fill a gap in the static site generation pipeline. There were some great proprietary headless CMS options, but no real contenders that were open source and extensible—that could turn into a community-built ecosystem like WordPress or Drupal. For that reason, Netlify CMS is made to be community-driven, and has never been locked to the Netlify platform (despite the name).

      Kind of an unfortunate name...

    1. "linked data" can and should be a very general term referring to any structured data that is interlinked/interconnected.

      It looks like most of this article describes it in that general sense, but sometimes it talks about URIs and such as if they are a necessary attribute of linked data, when that would only apply to Web-connected linked data. What about, for example, linked data that links to each other through some other convention such as just a "type" and "ID"? Maybe that shouldn't be considered linked data if it is too locally scoped? But that topic and distinction should be explored/discussed further...

      I love its application to web technologies, but I wish there were a distinct term for that application ("linked web data"?) so it could be clearer from reading the word whether you meant general case or not. May not be a problem in practice. We shall see.

      Granted/hopefully most use of linked data is in the context of the Web, so that the links are universal / globally scoped, etc.

    1. This change was made because GitLab License Management is now renamed to GitLab License Compliance. After review with users and analysts, we determined that this new name better indicates what the feature is for, aligns with existing market terminology, and reduces confusion with GitLab subscription licensing features.
    1. generic-sounding term may be interpreted as something more specific than intended: I want to be able to use "data interchange" in the most general sense. But if people interpret it to mean this specific standard/protocol/whatever, I may be misunderstood.

      The definition given here

      is the concept of businesses electronically communicating information that was traditionally communicated on paper, such as purchase orders and invoices.

      limits it to things that were previously communicated on paper. But what about things for which paper was never used, like the interchange of consent and consent receipts for GDPR/privacy law compliance, etc.?

      The term should be allowed to be used just as well for newer technologies/processes that had no previous roots in paper technologies.

    1. If the add-on is a fork of another add-on, the name must clearly distinguish it from the original and provide a significant difference in functionality and/or code.
  36. Apr 2020
    1. Some conventions reverse the order of priorities, considering lower values to be higher priority