18 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. for then he cannot fail of having his meaning understood, wherein consists the right use and perfection of language.

      I like Locke's notion that "the right use and perfection of language" is to have "meaning understood" (817). This still seems to be a notion we hold onto (CLARITY -- it's certainly one I strive for anyway), though we'd probably differ on his assertion that our words are just transcriptive/descriptive tools. See Barad's critique of representationalism.

  2. Dec 2018
    1. that experience,

      Which experience? I feel like the previous two paragraphs introduced enough different concepts that the antecedents here is unclear.

    2. The specter of upcoming departure influenced behavior in a way that removed one from reality — academics in Lyon mattered less at home, new friends would return to their countries of origin and communication would lapse, and why invest for comfort when somewhere so briefly?

      This sentence is 44 words!!!

    3. Not in Austin, but near, and often visiting. Twenty miles North. Sometimes, further

      Living twenty miles north of Austin or visiting twenty miles north? This is a confusing set of sentences. Unnecessarily truncated.

  3. Mar 2018
    1. Here in your Lordships’ House we are very fortunate to have a considerable number of noble and learned Lords who give us the benefit of their expertise. I have noticed that they often disagree, and very strongly. Therefore, surely keeping these issues in the Bill would save an awful lot of legal time and legal argument and would be better for the Government. I say that in a spirit of total helpfulness and support.
  4. Aug 2017
    1. There is this idea of women being able

      Some argue that women are able

    2. it makes it hard for someone who doesn’t fit into these molds of heteronormativity to find an authentic operatic voice when portraying a role, reenacting a scene, or just trying to relate to the lyrics in a particular song.

      These norms mean that when I perform a role, reenacting a scene, or trying to relate to the lyrics of a particular song, I am also performing gender, sexuality, and race, all in ways that make it a challenge to find an authentic operatic voice.

  5. Nov 2015
    1. It should be clear to you by now that any attempt to manipulate arises out of the limited three-dimensional frame of reference. Therefore, do not contemplate or express this desire when you know you are not in that Place. It will be a total waste of time and energy. You certainly should be aware that the need arises out of your Being, because the fulfillment of that desire is at hand to be consciously perceived and lived, rather than unconsciously lived as separate and apart from the totality of your Being. You are getting the picture, I see. Be alert to the fact, Paul, that sloppy questions beget sloppy answers. Learn to be more precise in your requests and your desires. An ambiguous question begets an ambiguous answer. If you want to know something, be sure to ask a question that begets a specific answer. As you are aware, James said, “Ye ask and receive not because ye ask amiss.“1 If you are not getting an answer to the need, it is because the question does not address itself to that specific answer. You will find that when you have the right question, you will spontaneously and effortlessly know the answer. You can depend upon it.

      Be very clear with your questions when asking for guidance and only ask from that place of connection to Being.

  6. May 2014
  7. Oct 2013
    1. clearness of speech

      concision and clarity the most important. He could learn from his own advice

    1. People do not feel towards strangers as they do towards their own countrymen, and the same thing is true of their feeling for language. It is therefore well to give to everyday speech an unfamiliar air: people like what strikes them, and are struck by what is out of the way.

      Style. Use language people recognize and understand.

    1. Obscurity is also caused if, when you intend to insert a number of details, you do not first make your meaning clear; for instance, if you say, "I meant, after telling him this, that and the other thing, to set out," rather than something of this kind "I meant to set out after telling him; then this, that, and the other thing occurred."

      This is so different from prose writing that I'm used to. I tend to embed clauses and who knows what it labyrinths of punctuation, but it makes sense that speeches need to be more straightforward. I was listening to a book that was completely confusing me, I could not follow it. I soon realized that this book could probably be easily read, but not easy to follow when listened to because we listen differently than we read.

    2. The foundation of good style is correctness of language, which falls under five heads. (1) First, the proper use of connecting words, and the arrangement of them in the natural sequence which some of them require. For instance, the connective "men" (e.g. ego men) requires the correlative "de" (e.g. o de). The answering word must be brought in before the first has been forgotten, and not be widely separated from it; nor, except in the few cases where this is appropriate, is another connective to be introduced before the one required. Consider the sentence, "But as soon as he told me (for Cleon had come begging and praying), took them along and set out." In this sentence many connecting words are inserted in front of the one required to complete the sense; and if there is a long interval before "set out," the result is obscurity. One merit, then, of good style lies in the right use of connecting words. (2) The second lies in calling things by their own special names and not by vague general ones. (3) The third is to avoid ambiguities; unless, indeed, you definitely desire to be ambiguous, as those do who have nothing to say but are pretending to mean something. Such people are apt to put that sort of thing into verse.

      What is really important is clarity.

    1. Chapter 5 (1407b) The foundation of good style is correctness of language, which is discussed under five heads: (1) right use of connecting words; (2) use of special, and not vague general, terms; (3) avoidance of ambiguity; (4) observance of gender; (5) correct indication of grammatical number. A composition should be easy to read and therefore easy to deliver; it should avoid (1) uncertainties as to puntuation, (2) zeugma, (3) parenthesis.
  8. Sep 2013
    1. Style to be good must be clear, as is proved by the fact that speech which fails to convey a plain meaning will fail to do just what speech has to do. It must also be appropriate, avoiding both meanness and undue elevation; poetical language is certainly free from meanness, but it is not appropriate to prose.

      Is this his definition?

    1. Style, to be good, must be clear; it must also be appropriate, avoiding both meanness and excess of dignity

      Balanced. It must understand its purpose and fulfill it tastefully

    1. I am one of those who are very willing to be refuted if I say anything which is not true, and very willing to refute any one else who says what is not true, and quite as ready to be refuted as to refute; for I hold that this is the greater gain of the two, just as the gain is greater of being cured of a very great evil than of curing another. For I imagine that there is no evil which a man can endure so great as an erroneous opinion about the matters of which we are speaking; and if you claim to be one of my sort, let us have the discussion out, but if you would rather have done, no matter;—let us make an end of it.

      Socrates is willing to accept when he is wrong, he just wants to understand what Gorgias is saying. He thinks Gorgias is inconsistent and wants clarity.