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  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jul 2021
    1. A stunning little essay on a small section of the massive problems we face in America viewed through the lens of our teeth.

    2. It’s a familiar trick in the privatisation-happy US – like, say, underfunding public education and then criticising the institution for struggling.

      This same thing is being seen in the U.S. Post Office now too. Underfund it into failure rather than provide a public good.

      Capitalism definitely hasn't solved the issue, and certainly without government regulation. See also the last mile problem for internet service, telephone service, and cable service.

      UPS and FedEx apparently rely on the USPS for last mile delivery in remote areas. (Source for this?)

      The poor and the remote are inordinately effected in almost all these cases. What other things do these examples have in common? How can we compare and contrast the public service/government versions with the private capitalistic ones to make the issues more apparent. Which might be the better solution: capitalism with tight government regulation to ensure service at the low end or a government monopoly of the area? or something in between?

    3. the underprivileged are priced out of the dental-treatment system yet perversely held responsible for their dental condition.

      How does this happen?

      Is it the idea of "personal responsibility" and "pull yourself up by the bootstraps" philosophy combined with lack of any actual support and/or education?

      There has to be a better phrase or word to define the perverse sort of philosophy espoused by many in the Republican party about this sort of "personal responsibility".

      It feels somewhat akin to the idea of privatize profits and socialize the losses. The social loss is definitely one that is pushed off onto the individual, but who's profiting? Is it really so expensive to fix this problem? Isn't the loss to society and public health akin to the Million Dollar Murray problem?

      Wouldn't each individual's responsibility be better tied to the collective good as well as their own outcomes? How can the two be bound together to improve outcomes for everyone all around?

    4. It was lack of insurance, lack of knowledge, lack of good nutrition – poverties into which much of the country was born.

      Poverty and thus lack of knowledge, lack of good nutrition, and lack of dental insurance are the cause of bad teeth in America. Apparently it's not drugs or sugar, though they surely don't help.

    1. Nick Holliman. (2021, May 30). @anthonybmasters @d_spiegel A quick visual summary of data on this week’s article by @anthonybmasters & @d_spiegel The outlook is uncertain, although we have survived a variant once already (B.1.1.7). The data on the effect of variants is analysed as fast as it (reliably) arrives. Https://t.co/vOKmCxYMGT https://t.co/3ZeJJTdRs3 [Tweet]. @binocularity. https://twitter.com/binocularity/status/1398957348492918784

  3. Jun 2021
    1. Lewis Spurgin on Twitter: “Perhaps an under appreciated point with the B.1.617.2 variant is that regional PHE teams and local authorities across the country are putting in heroic amounts of effort to break chains of transmission. (1/2)” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved June 27, 2021, from https://twitter.com/LewisSpurgin/status/1395827267297759234

    1. Deepti Gurdasani on Twitter: “I’m still utterly stunned by yesterday’s events—Let me go over this in chronological order & why I’m shocked. - First, in the morning yesterday, we saw a ‘leaked’ report to FT which reported on @PHE_uk data that was not public at the time🧵” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved June 27, 2021, from https://twitter.com/dgurdasani1/status/1396373990986375171

    1. Bolze, A., Cirulli, E. T., Luo, S., White, S., Cassens, T., Jacobs, S., Nguyen, J., Ramirez, J. M., Sandoval, E., Wang, X., Wong, D., Becker, D., Laurent, M., Lu, J. T., Isaksson, M., Washington, N. L., & Lee, W. (2021). Rapid displacement of SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.1.7 by B.1.617.2 and P.1 in the United States [Preprint]. Infectious Diseases (except HIV/AIDS). https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.06.20.21259195

  4. May 2021
    1. Reducing pain at the time of vaccination: WHO Position Paper – September 2015. Weekly epidemiological record. 2015;90(39):505–16 (www.who.int /immunization/policy/position_papers /reducing_pain_vaccination/en/)

    1. Amidst the global pandemic, this might sound not dissimilar to public health. When I decide whether to wear a mask in public, that’s partially about how much the mask will protect me from airborne droplets. But it’s also—perhaps more significantly—about protecting everyone else from me. People who refuse to wear a mask because they’re willing to risk getting Covid are often only thinking about their bodies as a thing to defend, whose sanctity depends on the strength of their individual immune system. They’re not thinking about their bodies as a thing that can also attack, that can be the conduit that kills someone else. People who are careless about their own data because they think they’ve done nothing wrong are only thinking of the harms that they might experience, not the harms that they can cause.

      What lessons might we draw from public health and epidemiology to improve our privacy lives in an online world? How might we wear social media "masks" to protect our friends and loved ones from our own posts?